Different Solutions Guzman & Gomez Project OzIA Presentation

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  • Guzman e Gomez was opened in Newtown in late 2006. The owner is from New York and he had two very good Mexican friends, their fathers’ names were Guzman and Gomez, that how he came up with the name. The concept of the restaurant is modern interpretation of Taqueria, which is a street side Mexican eatery. Guzman Y Gomez introduced this new food concept into the Australian market – being aware that Australians were not so familiar with Mexican food. Their challenge was that the menu confused their customers which led to extremely long order times This reduced the amount of customers they could serve in peak periods and meant the stores were not fulfilling their potential in terms of revenue After trying to fix the problem themselves several times GYG came to Different
  • Guzman e Gomez was opened in Newtown in late 2006. The owner is from New York and he had two very good Mexican friends, their fathers’ names were Guzman and Gomez, that how he came up with the name. The concept of the restaurant is modern interpretation of Taqueria, which is a street side Mexican eatery. Guzman Y Gomez introduced this new food concept into the Australian market – being aware that Australians were not so familiar with Mexican food. Their challenge was that the menu confused their customers which led to extremely long order times This reduced the amount of customers they could serve in peak periods and meant the stores were not fulfilling their potential in terms of revenue After trying to fix the problem themselves several times GYG came to Different
  • Reviewed competitors in Australia Square Worked with GYG to define personas and how they interact with the brand Conducted in-store contextual inquiries to understand the current customer experience Conducted attitudinal research with customers before & after their ordering experience
  • Halved ordering time Significantly increased average takings during peak periods
  • Model – is a tool to think with – representation of complex relationships that provide a-ha insights Experience modeling is about breaking down an experience (often visually) and communicating its key elements
  • Compositional: How do elements of an experience fit together to form a coherent whole? Sensual: What does the design and overall atmosphere make us feel? Emotional: What emotions color the experience for us? Spatio – temporal: What effects do place and time have on our experience?
  • 1. Observe behavior and understand cultural context (context analysis) 2. Find patterns in observational and qualitative data and generalize them (Distill the data) 3. Share the sketches of your ideas/ views, visually or verbally communicate concepts, put them into design Final model: Meaningful representation of behaviors/ attitudes applicable to larger contexts 4. Test your concepts
  • Objective: is to understand how similar businesses operate and which task models they own. Comp analysis was done in Australia square in lunch times over two days. Observations and time tracking. Outcome: we identified task models and what to measure. Order at once is the model where you look at the menu or a deal and order it at the counter and then wait for your food to take away Order sequentially model is where you go to the sandwich bar, choose the bread, choose the filling, choose the sauce and watch your sandwich being made in front of your eyes.
  • Objective: is to set the research/ benchmark criteria for the whole project and compare between competitors measurements and task models and to the business Outcome: Identified the best service time, quickest ordering time and the best task model that suits GYG
  • The time tracking process was an important part of the research, I did this activity both with competitors and in- store. That s me behind the counter with a stop watch recording how long it takes for customers to look at the menu, to wait in the queue, to order and how long it takes to deliver food.
  • Objective: to define the initial state of the business. This table shows the measurements in the three different stores in Sydney in peak hours The average ordering time is 1 min 20 seconds and food delivery time is 3 minutes on average. Compared to other businesses in Aust square the food prep time was ok but the ordering time was quite long. Customer flow per 5 minutes was quite low compared to Aust square and obviously they ve never worked at that capacity.
  • Objective: was to define customer attitudes, and problems from customers’ perspective and to understand social interactions. Findings: Choice is good, but who reads the whole menu? Mostly no understanding of choices Little understanding of what the base ingredients of each type of food is. Lack of visual communication (pictures) Menu did not really provide leadership customers are looking for Staff helps customers: Vanessa noticed two customers were confused, she explained what is in a burrito, and taco etc. and helped them to order by giving a suggestion. Staff makes the ordering more personal, by helping them out and by being friendly and talking to them. Too many decision points 3 basic questions versus 200 choices on the menu Not leveraging staff expertise into the menu GYG knows Mexican food, customers don’t, so guide customers into it – staff already doing it..
  • We identified two types of customers at the end of contextual inquiries: Newbies and Regulars. Regulars knew about the food and knew what to order. They could order as short as 30 seconds, however for newbies it was taking a lot more time 2 and a half to 5 minutes. The reason was that staff explaining the food and how to order from the menu etc. In both cases staff was asking too many questions (which salsa? Extra guac on the side) and then asking their name typing it into the order. Staff was calling out customer names to deliver the food – because GYG thought it was more friendly and personal to know customer names.
  • Some of the newbies came in with a friend who is a regular and ordered what the regular friend recommended Most newbies made their food decisions based on what they saw (pictures) and what the staff recommended. Newtown : Customers are keen to talk to the staff and watch how they work behind the counter, they enjoy the music and the food. They are not in a hurry. They know a lot about the food. Kings X: Customers (%70 local) are open to recommendations and they like their interaction/conversation with the staff, and it is friendly and very relaxed. Bondi Junction : Local customers are more individualistic, their interactions are based on ordering, not so personal as in the other shops. Most customers scan the menu for a while and stay away, rather than asking for advice/ help. International young/beach customers are more relaxed and open to conversation, they are quick decision makers.
  • Objective: define current customer flow in the space and other perceptual factors that affect food ordering.
  • We tracked how customers move in the store beginning from entry to the restaurant to collecting their food
  • Too many decision points. Too many choice. Not leveraging staff expertise into the menu Lack of understanding of the food Physical environment affects ability to make quick decisions Too many decision points 3 basic questions versus 200 choices on the menu Aspects of implementation of brand interfering with ordering Taking and calling out names Bringing the food to the customer Not leveraging staff expertise into the menu GYG knows Mexican food, customers don’t, so guide customers into it – staff already doing it.. Customers rely on staff to get answers Clarify size of the food (Large or snack), Meat choice, Spice levels, size of extras, Clarity about flavors, what extras look like Physical environment affects ability to make quick decisions Menu board layout, how customer moves in the store and what s/he sees first affects their decisions A shop in Australia Square needs a different concept: it would be all about increasing the capacity but minimizing the personality .
  • Too many decision points. Too many choice. Not leveraging staff expertise into the menu Lack of understanding of the food Physical environment affects ability to make quick decisions
  • Introduce trusted advisor as dominant part of the menu (as opposed to current DIY). Pick a salsa as default, change if needed. Is lack of choice an issue? Use pictures to communicate what the food is like and to have direct orders. Use modules for different needs: trusted advisor, pictures, democrat, fitness facts Apply the perceptual areas Perceptual areas applied Labeling issues: Reduce the number of fillings offered based on sales data Indicate SPICY/ MILD clearly Indicate MEAT type clearly Refine and identify what is “extra/ side” what is an “entree”.
  • Use numbers for ordering/delivery instead of names Change the layout of one shop to direct people into queuing and then to the left – designated waiting area. Optional Promote entrees during waiting period in the waiting area No questions for take away or have here, make the packaging standard and let the customer choose to stay or go when they receive their food.
  • Objectives: are (1) to test customer acceptance of the new concept (2) to track customers’ spatial and temporal behavior in modified spatial layout and test previous findings Feedback on menu redesign Clearer, easy to understand Good layout / structure Everyone liked having pictures on the menu New customers commented that the menu is very descriptive – they did not complain about “lack of choice” Regulars noticed and liked the deals Some regulars thought it looked a bit like McDonalds now/ more fast food type menu
  • Creating a cyclic flow takes the load off from queuing spots Single delivery point is an important spot that regulates customer flow Allow space for queuing and waiting spots Educate customers while they wait (with engaging material)
  • The shelf display engages people and helps organise the flow
  • The shelf display engages people and helps organise the flow
  • Communicate size of the meals efficiently
  • Objectives: are (1) to test customer acceptance of the new product/ concept and obtain feedback about the visual design (2) to track customers’ spatial and temporal behavior in modified spatial layout and test previous findings Obtain feedback about the visual design Share results with stakeholders and discuss further revisions Discuss implementation of the design and agree on strategies
  • Online methods are applicable to offline env. Success Offline methods (such as field studies ethnography ) are applicable to the online env. UCD methods Competitors review and best of breed Information architecture of the menu including labeling issues Contextual inquiries Task analysis and personas Collaborative design Methods from ethnography and field studies Observations in the field Video monitoring and analysis
  • Do not overlook the physical environment people are situated in. We looked at the experience from end to end- entry to collecting food – although they came us to design the menu board. Business identified the ordering problems as possible “language barrier”, many questions staff has to ask to customers and lack of familiarity with Mexican food. However we explored different aspects of the customer experience and how each element made an impact on each other. If we focused in on the menu board only we would miss out the perceptual factors, physical limitations, spatial flow in the store etc. How they got there is as important as ordering. That gave us more insights for redesign They are not looking just on the screen, it s not the time spent looking at the screen either
  • What is the user’s goal in this moment? In on moment a user’s goal can be to figure out the name and purpose of the site after landing there from a Google search result. The goal of the next moment can be to figure out the controls for a for a video player to watch the latest news. The next moment can be to figure out how to contact the company. The task person is attempting to complete at any given moment is the most important task to that person at that moment. It s our job to make sure nothing goes wrong and that moment is enjoyable and productive and helps our user feel smart. Our job is to solve for all these moments
  • Different Solutions Guzman & Gomez Project OzIA Presentation

    1. 1. Better thinking. Better experiences. Better results. TM
    2. 2. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Project background
    3. 3. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Project background
    4. 4. <ul><li>Competitors review </li></ul><ul><li>Personas and Tasks </li></ul><ul><li>In-store contextual inquiries </li></ul><ul><li>Attitudinal research </li></ul><ul><li>Spatial flow analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Prototyped new concepts </li></ul><ul><li>Tested the new concepts </li></ul><ul><li>Refined the new experience </li></ul>How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Project Background What we did? September 08
    5. 5. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Results
    6. 6. Experience Modelling
    7. 7. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito What is it? Experience modeling
    8. 8. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito The four threads of experience Experience modeling
    9. 9. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito How we model experience and test it Experience modeling
    10. 10. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Competitors review Context Analysis Order at once v2 Order sequentially v2 Order sequentially v3
    11. 11. We measured customer flow rates between two different ordering models September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Benchmarking Context Analysis
    12. 12. We measured durations of ordering, waiting in the queue, and food preparation time September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Benchmarking Context Analysis
    13. 13. Order and service times September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito In-store observations Context Analysis Number of Observations Store Location Order time Food service time Customer flow (per 5 mins) 31 Bondi Junction 1:05 ~ 3:00 3 - 4 28 Kings Cross 1:38 Less than 2:00 1 - 2 32 Newtown 1:17 ~ 4:30 4 - 6 91 total 1:20 average ~3:00 average
    14. 14. Physical limitations and perception of the menu boards September 08 Dark points In-store observations Context Analysis Dark points How many seconds does it take to order a burrito 1 . Choose Burrito, 2 or 3 Tacos, Quesadillasor Burrito Bowl 2 . Choose filling: chicken, beef, fish, mushrooms, peppers …more than 10 options 3 . Choose salsa: 3 options Sides chips and guacamole etc.
    15. 15. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Contextual inquiries Behavioral Analysis
    16. 16. August 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Customer – staff interactions Behavioral Analysis September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito
    17. 17. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Social interactions & attitudes Behavioral Analysis
    18. 18. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Video monitoring and analysis Behavioral Analysis
    19. 19. Customer flow in Bondi Junction store September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Spatio – temporal analysis Behavioral Analysis
    20. 20. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Experience model Concept Prototyping
    21. 21. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Visualize solutions and share Concept Prototyping
    22. 22. August 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Visualize solutions and share Concept Prototyping September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito
    23. 23. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Menu re-design Concept Prototyping
    24. 24. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Spatio – temporal design Concept Prototyping Bondi Junction Kings Cross
    25. 25. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Concept testing 1 st round + revisions Prototype Testing and Refining
    26. 26. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Ordering and queuing time reduced by 50% Results: testing 1 st round Prototype Testing and Refining
    27. 27. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito BEFORE AFTER Results: testing 1 st round Prototype Testing and Refining
    28. 28. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Results: temporal assessment Prototype Testing and Refining Spatial flow after ordering
    29. 29. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Results: temporal assessment Prototype Testing and Refining Spatial flow after collecting food
    30. 30. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Visual design Prototype Testing and Refining New food shots Handover to visual designer
    31. 31. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito BEFORE AFTER Concept testing 2 nd round Prototype Testing and Refining
    32. 32. <ul><ul><li>GYG is now earning 6 times more from sales in overall store locations </li></ul></ul>September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Current State
    33. 33. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Overall Learning UCD works in offline & online environments
    34. 34. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Significance of time and place Explore the impact of spatial and temporal threads Overall Learning
    35. 35. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Focus on composition and context A good user experience is all about good moments (Designing the Moments -Robert Hoekman, jr. ) Overall Learning
    36. 36. September 08 How many seconds does it take to order a burrito Questions?

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