Iep report

322 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
322
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Iep report

  1. 1. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 1 of 69 INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN September 2004 SECOND DRAFT
  2. 2. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 2 of 69 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................5 2. INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT .....................................................................5 2.1. History of IEM ....................................................................................................................6 2.2. Introduction to IEM .............................................................................................................6 2.3. The basic principles of IEM .................................................................................................6 2.4. Legislation applicable to IEM ...............................................................................................8 2.5. Local Authorities and the Environmental/ Sustainability Interface ...........................................9 2.5.1 The governance function............................................................................................... 10 2.5.2 Controller or influences of activities, products, services and facilities................................ 11 2.5.3 The local authority as a governed institution ................................................................... 11 2.5.4 Conservation................................................................................................................ 11 3. INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL PLAN................................................................................... 12 3.1. The IDP and the Integrated Environmental Plan ................................................................. 12 3.1.1 Analysis Phase............................................................................................................. 13 3.1.2 Strategies .................................................................................................................... 13 3.1.3 Integration Phase......................................................................................................... 14 3.1.4 DEAT Requirements for the evaluation of IDPs .............................................................. 14 3.1.5 Proposed IEP Methodology ........................................................................................... 15 4. LOCAL ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ISSUES ................................................................. 16 4.1.1 Priority Issues within the IDP ......................................................................................... 16 4.1.2 Environmental Issues identified within the SOER............................................................ 17 4.1.3 Environmental Issues identified during the Environmental Legal Audit.............................. 18 5. ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGIES............................................................................................. 23 5.1. LEGISLATION (Regulated) ............................................................................................... 26 5.1.1 NON-COMPLIANCE TO ENVIRONMENTAL PROCEDURES ......................................... 26 5.2. LEGISLATION (REGULATOR).......................................................................................... 27 5.2.1 OUT DATED BY LAWS ................................................................................................ 27 5.3. OWN ACTIVITIES / INFRASTRUCTURE ........................................................................... 29 5.3.1 ENERGY EFFICIENCY OF MUNICIPAL FACILITIES ..................................................... 29 5.3.2 POLLUTION LEVELS AT MUNICIPAL FACILITIES ........................................................ 30 5.3.3 AUTHORIZATIONS AT OWN FACILTIES ...................................................................... 30 5.4. SUPPORT SERVICES ..................................................................................................... 32
  3. 3. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 3 of 69 5.4.1 INSUFFICIENT ENVIRONMENTA L MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES IN SERVICE DELIVERY PROCESSES ......................................................................................................... 32 5.4.2 UNDEFINED ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITIES OF EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS ..... 33 5.4.3 MONITORING OF WATER CONSUMPTION ................................................................. 33 5.4.4 UNREGULATED AND IRRESPONSIBLE LAND USES................................................... 34 5.5. CONSERVATION............................................................................................................. 35 5.5.1 WASTE REDUCTION AND MANAGEMENT.................................................................. 35 5.5.2 WATER POLLUTION.................................................................................................... 36 5.5.3 AIR POLLUTION.......................................................................................................... 37 5.5.4 LOSS OF BIODIVERSITY ............................................................................................. 38 5.5.5 ECONOMIC USE OF BIODIVERSITY ........................................................................... 39 5.5.6 INSUFFICIENT CONTROL OF INVADER PLANT SPECIES ........................................... 40 5.5.7 DAMAGE AND LOSS OF SOIL RESOURCES ............................................................... 40 5.5.8 DAMAGE AND LOSS OF CULTURAL HERITAGE RESOURCES ................................... 41 5.6. PUBLIC PARTICIPATION ................................................................................................. 42 5.6.1 PUBLIC PARTICIPATION IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING ............................ 42 5.6.2 PUBLIC OWNERSHIP OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES......................................... 43 5.7. EDUCATION AND TRAINING........................................................................................... 43 5.7.1 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH RIGHTS OF MUNICIPAL PERSONNEL............................. 43 5.7.2 ENVIRONMENTAL SKILLS DEVELOPMENT OF MUNICIPAL PERSONNEL .................. 44 5.7.3 PUBLIC ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION ..................................................................... 44 6. IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMMES ........................................................................................ 46 6.1. Research and Registration Programme (REGP)................................................................. 48 6.1.1 PURPOSE ................................................................................................................... 48 6.1.2 ROLEPLAYERS ........................................................................................................... 48 6.1.3 ACTIVITIES AND PROJECTS ....................................................................................... 48 6.2. Community Based Planning & Management Programme (CBPP) ........................................ 51 6.2.1 PURPOSE ................................................................................................................... 51 6.2.2 ROLEPLAYERS ........................................................................................................... 51 6.2.3 ACTIVITIES AND PROJECTS ....................................................................................... 51 6.3. Management Programme (MANP)..................................................................................... 53 6.3.1 PURPOSE ................................................................................................................... 53 6.3.2 ROLEPLAYERS ........................................................................................................... 53 6.3.3 ACTIVITIES AND PROJECTS ....................................................................................... 53 6.4. Public Awareness and Training Programme (PATP)........................................................... 55 6.4.1 PURPOSE ................................................................................................................... 55 6.4.2 ROLEPLAYERS ........................................................................................................... 55 6.4.3 ACTIVITIES AND PROJECTS ....................................................................................... 55 6.5. Standards and Guidelines Programme (STGP) .................................................................. 57 6.5.1 PURPOSE ................................................................................................................... 57 6.5.2 ROLEPLAYERS ........................................................................................................... 57
  4. 4. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 4 of 69 6.5.3 ACTIVITIES AND PROJECTS ....................................................................................... 57 6.6. Organisational structuring Programme (ORGP) .................................................................. 59 6.6.1 PURPOSE ................................................................................................................... 59 6.6.2 ROLEPLAYERS ........................................................................................................... 59 6.6.3 ACTIVITIES AND PROJECTS ....................................................................................... 59 6.7. Law enforcement Programme (LAWP)............................................................................... 61 6.7.1 PURPOSE ................................................................................................................... 61 6.7.2 ROLEPLAYERS ........................................................................................................... 61 6.7.3 ACTIVITIES AND PROJECTS ....................................................................................... 61 6.8. Equipment and technology programme (EQPP) ................................................................. 63 6.8.1 PURPOSE ................................................................................................................... 63 6.8.2 ROLEPLAYERS ........................................................................................................... 63 6.8.3 ACTIVITIES AND PROJECTS ....................................................................................... 63 6.9. Conservation Programme (CONP)..................................................................................... 65 6.9.1 PURPOSE ................................................................................................................... 65 6.9.2 ROLEPLAYERS ........................................................................................................... 65 6.9.3 ACTIVITIES AND PROJECTS ....................................................................................... 65 6.10. Rehabilitation Programme (RHBP) .................................................................................... 67 6.10.1 PURPOSE ............................................................................................................... 67 6.10.2 ROLEPLAYERS ....................................................................................................... 67 6.10.3 ACTIVITIES AND PROJECTS ................................................................................... 67
  5. 5. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 5 of 69 1. INTRODUCTION Environmental considerations have become an integral part of developmental thinking and decision making in South Africa. It is imperative that local municipalities have access to efficient environmental information to allow for strategic and project level developmental planning. In view of the latter the IDP Process proposes the formulation of an Integrated Environmental Programme (IEP) as a sector plan requirement in terms of the IDP Process Guidepacks. Each local council is thus required to formulate an IEP and thus ensure that environmental considerations are truly integrated with the outcomes of the IDP process. 2. INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Environmental Management is a field that is rapidly growing in importance as a discipline of its own. It is “the process of administering, supervising or handling the environment in order to achieve a desired outcome” (Fuggle and Rabie 1999). As the natural services provided to humans by the environment, such as clean water, clean air, sustainable energy and waste purification are increasingly threatened, and as humanity edges ever closer to the ultimate carrying capacity of the earth, so environmental management will become increasingly necessary. Two important concepts of corporate responsibility for the environment are being applied with growing frequency in Europe. The first is a simple but powerful term: “duty of care” It implies that individuals, corporations and institutions have a duty to protect the environment, whether the law requires it or not (Raven et al. 1995). The second concept is known as the “precautionary principle”. It is written into international laws regarding the dumping of toxic waste at sea, it infers that a lack of scientific evidence is no excuse to avoid protecting the environment if meaningful evidence of damage exists (Raven et al. 1995). According to Miller (2002) it is vital to develop more environmentally sustainable societies by shifting our efforts from: • Pollution cleanup to pollution prevention • Waste disposal to waste prevention and reduction • Protecting the species to protecting the habitat where they live • Environmental degradation to environmental restoration • Increased resource use to more efficient resource use • Population growth to population stabilization
  6. 6. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 6 of 69 2.1. History of IEM The Council for the Environment proposed the concept of Integrated Environmental Management (IEM) to the Minister of Environmental Affairs during 1989 in the form of a document called Integrated Environmental Management in South Africa. The Department of Environmental Affairs formalized the procedure in such a way that it was accepted as policy by government. A series of guideline documents formed the first part of the formalisation process. Further steps included policy statement in terms of section 2 of the Environment Conservation Act, 1989 (Act 73 of 1989) and the enactment of the provisions under sections 21, 22, 23 and 26 of the same Act. The IEM procedure should be implemented in such a way that it complements – rather than duplicates – existing planning and other procedures. Where appropriate, the IEM procedure should be used to supplement existing requirements, rather than replace them. (Department of Environmental Affairs, 1992. The Integrated Environmental Management procedure). 2.2. Introduction to IEM Integrated Environmental Management (IEM) is designed to ensure that the environmental consequences of development proposals are understood and adequately considered in the planning process. The term environmental is used in its broad sense, encompassing biophysical and socio-economic components. The purpose of the IEM is to resolve or mitigate any negative impacts and to enhance positive aspects of development proposals. (Department of Environmental Affairs, 1992). The definition of IEM according to the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism, (1998) is: A philosophy which prescribes a code of practice for ensuring that environmental considerations are fully integrated into all stages of the development process in order to achieve a desirable balance between conservation and development. The vision for IEM, according to the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism, (1998), is to lay the foundation for environmentally sustainable development based on integrated and holistic environmental management practices and processes. 2.3. The basic principles of IEM The basic principles underpinning IEM are that there be: i) informed decision-making; ii) accountability for information on which decisions are taken; iii) accountability for decisions taken; iv) a broad meaning given to the term environment (i.e. one that includes physical, biological, social, economic, cultural, historical and political components);
  7. 7. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 7 of 69 v) an open, participatory approach in the planning of proposals; vi) consultation with interested and affected parties; vii) due consideration of alternative options; viii) an attempt to mitigate negative impacts and enhance positive aspects of proposals; ix) an attempt to ensure that the ‘social costs’ of development proposals (those borne by society, rather than the developers) be outweighed by the ‘social benefits’ (benefits to society as a result of the actions of the developers); x) democratic regard for individual rights and obligations; xi) compliance with these principles during all stages of the planning, implementation and decommissioning of proposals (i.e. from “cradle to grave”), and xii) the opportunity for public and specialist input in the decision-making process. (Department of Environmental Affairs, 1992).
  8. 8. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 8 of 69 2.4. Legislation applicable to IEM In South Africa the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa ensures that the environment of South Africa is protected, ultimately for the benefit of the people of South Africa. Chapter 2, section 24 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa (RSA, 1996) states that: Chapter 2, section 24: Everyone has the right – a) to an environment that is not harmful to their health or well-being; and b) to have the environment protected, for the benefit of present and future generations, through reasonable legislative and other measures that – i) prevent pollution and ecological degradation; ii) promote conservation; and iii) secure ecologically sustainable development and use of natural resources while promoting justifiable economic and social development. The National Environmental Management Act (Act 107 of 1998) also addresses Integrated Environmental Management in Chapter 5 of the said act. In addition Section 21, 22, 23 and 26 of the Environment Conservation Act, 1989 (Act 73 of 1989) are also applicable to Integrated Environmental Management. Figure 1 illustrates the over arching function of Integrated Environmental Management (IEM). As is clearly visible from the table, IEM acts as the collective term for different environmental management tools. All the environmental management instruments under the banner of IEM are indicated in their respective category below. The Mangaung Local Municipality has already utilized some of the instruments.
  9. 9. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 9 of 69 2.5. Local Authorities and the Environmental/ Sustainability Interface A range of environmental competencies and responsibilities delegated to South African local authorities that may be controlled or influenced by appointed officials, elected politicians and civil society are classified into four categories (See Figure 2). They include the municipality as a governing organ of state, as a governed entity, as an operator with activities, products, services and facilities that may impact on the environment as well as a conservation function. The elements include: • The political reality of local level governance, the reality of political agendas, the need for political support, and buyin are key factors to consider. It may also be a good idea not to commence with implementation of an EMS at the end of election cycles, as continuity may be jeopardised; • The broader community constituency is also important as community input and support for the process is also important. Implementation of an EMS at the local level should, therefore, be needs based as well ; • Local spheres of government function within the ambit of national and provincial policies, functions and legislation. They are, therefore, governed by other spheres of governance and conformity to national and DECISION-MAKING INSTRUMENTS • Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) • Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) • Environmental Optimisation Assessment (EOA) • Cost-benefit Analysis (CBA) INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (IEM) MANAGING INSTRUMENTS • Environmental Management Programme (EMP) • Environmental Management System (EMS) • Life-cycle analysis CRISES RESPONSE MONITORING INSTRUMENTS • Auditing • Compliance Management COMMUNICA TION AND INFORMATION TOOLS
  10. 10. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 10 of 69 regional policies and strategies are key issues. In South Africa, linking an EMS with the IDP -process is importantl; • Often appointed officials need to be trained in greener governance issues, strategies and tools and the concept may be new to most of them • Local authorities are also organisations that control and influence activities, products, services and facilities that may have significant impacts in the environment; • Local authorities also have important nature and heritage resource conservation functions; • Public and Private-Partnerships may be a useful strategy to establish environmental management and sustainability management relationships with the private sector. Figure 2: Framework for Environmental Management at the local level 2.5.1 The governance function The governance function involves four aspects: • development of environmentally related legislation at the local level • executive mandate to implement legislative arrangements • a law enforcement function • the good governance duty in line with the Batho Pele principles. The Local Municipality is responsible for the development of relevant local by-laws to ensure that all the relevant environmental aspects are governed within a legislative framework that is in line with national and provincial principles.
  11. 11. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 11 of 69 The Local Municipality also has an executive function (including co-governance arrangements) that is linked with law enforcement functions. This refers specifically to environmental aspects such as air pollution, land use management, waste management, etc. In terms of co-operative governance, the local authority has both competence and commenting functions. Protecting the global common goods is also an important element of this function. 2.5.2 Controller or influences of activities, products, services and facilities The Local Municipality is involved in a whole range of activities, handling of products and rendering of services. It is also either the owner or user of facilities that have or may have significant impact on the environment. These activities and council assets also require envi ronmental management and compliance. Improved eco-efficiency, linked with socio-economic development, poverty reduction and legal compliance are the key issues at stake. 2.5.3 The local authority as a governed institution The Local Municipality provides a range of infrastructure services and, in recent years, is also required to facilitate economic development and other “soft” functions. The services invariably demand effective environmental management practice to mitigate and control the potential impacts associated therewith. Many of these services are governed by the national and provincial spheres of governance and hence require legal compliance from local authorities. Another issue is efficient, regular and cost effective rendering of these services in order ensure viable and healthy communities. 2.5.4 Conservation Conservation is an important function in terms of environmental and heritage resource management responsibilities since Local Municipalities own or influence large tracts of land with high conservation value as well as important heritage resources. The general conservation function also entails provision of a general healthy environment that is conducive to a dignified quality of live with access to recreational facilities, clean air and water as well as ample functional open space. Biodiversity management is an important function as well.
  12. 12. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 12 of 69 3. INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL PLAN 3.1. The IDP and the Integrated Environmental Plan According to the Municipal Systems Act, (32 of 2000) every new council that comes into office based on the outcome of local government elections has to prepare its own IDP, which will guide it for a five year term of office. The IDP, therefore, is linked to the term of office of councillors. A new local council has the option to either adopt the IDP of its predecessor should it be acceptable to do so, or develop a new IDP, taking into consideration existing planning documents. The IDP is a strategic planning instrument which guides and informs all planning, budgeting, management and decision-making in a municipality. According to the Municipal Systems Act, (32 of 2000), all municipalities (i.e Metros, District Municipalities and Local Municipalities) have to undertake an integrated development planning process to produce integrated development plans (IDPs). As the IDP is a legislative requirement, it has a legal status and it supersedes all other plans that guide development at local government level. Legislation requires that integrated development planning should be an interactive and participatory process that requires involvement of a number of stakeholders. The timing of the process is closely related to the municipal budgeting cycle. The IDP is reviewed annually which results in the amendments to the plan should it be necessary. As part of the IDP, various sector plans need to be generated such as for water, housing, transport, environment, disaster management, waste management, AIDS, etc. During the IDP process the relevant issues per sector are identified and then translated into sector plans during the Integration Phase of the IDP. Although the environment is a specific sector plan requirement, it is evident that environmental issues are cross cutting through all other sector plans. As a sector plan the IDP Process requires each local municipality to formulate an IEP. Table 2 provides a summary of the environmental requirements as stated in the IDP Guide Packs.
  13. 13. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 13 of 69 * Phase 3 of the IDP Process does not indicate any specific environmental requirements an thus is not listed 3.1.1 Analysis Phase The analysis phase deals with the existing situation. It is the focused analysis of the type of problems faced by the people in the municipal area and includes the following: • Listing of all developmental issues • Prioritisation of the issues • Stakeholder and community participation. The extent and depth of the analysis phase are determined by the availability of data and access the local municipality has to specialist capacity. 3.1.2 Strategies Once the municipality understands the challenges affecting the people of the area and their causes, it should formulate solutions to address the issues. This phase includes the formulation of: • The vision – the vision is a statement indicating the ideal situation the municipality would like to achieve in the long term. This is the situation the municipality would find itself in once it has addressed the problems identified in Phase 1 • The development objectives – once the priority issues are identified in Phase 1, they need to be translated into objectives. Development objectives are statements of what the municipality would like to achieve in the medium term in order to address the issues (problems) and also contribute to the realization of the vision. In other words the objectives should bridge the gap between the current reality and the vision • The development strategies – once the municipality knows where it wants to go (vision) and what it needs to achieve to realize the vision (objectives), it must then develop strategies. Development strategies provide answers to the questions of how the municipality will reach its objectives. They are strategic decisions about the most appropriate ways and means to achieve the objectives • Project identification - Once strategies are formulated, they result in the identification of projects. Public participation should take place in Phase 2 in the form of a public debate on the appropriate ways and means of solving problems.
  14. 14. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 14 of 69 3.1.3 Integration Phase Once the projects are identified, the municipality must make sure that they are in line with the municipality’s objectives and strategies, its’ resource framework, and comply with all legal requirements. Furthermore, this phase is an opportunity for the municipality to harmonise the projects in terms of contents, location and timing in order to arrive at a consolidated and an integrated approach such as proposed by the IEP. 3.1.4 DEAT Requirements for the evaluation of IDPs Many problems have arisen in the past with the evaluation of local government IDPs / LDOs by the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEAT). These problems motivated the Department to compile a guideline document 2001/2002 for the sole purpose of evaluating IDPs and overcoming these problems. The objective of the guideline document is to evaluate compliance of the IDP in terms of environmental legislation and to identify possible gaps that may exist. Furthermore, it should serve as a measure for provincial administrations to evaluate to what extent environmental management is considered in an IDP. These requirements serve two purposes. Firstly it enables a province to assess whether an IDP accurately meets environmental provisions, and secondly to identify which municipalities require assistance in this regard. The evaluation is in the form of a checklist and questionnaire, which must be completed by a municipality and attached to the IDP. A copy of both documents should then be sent to the relevant environmental authority. The guideline document consists of a checklist that describes the minimum documents and substantive requirements for environmental issues, and a questionnaire. The checklist is divided into six environmental theme categories: • Waste management • Air quality • Water resource management • Biodiversity and sensitive areas • Energy resources and energy use and • Land use management and control. Each environmental theme is sub-categorized into different environmental issues. The main purpose of the checklist is to determine which section of the IDP addresses the designated environmental issue. The questionnaire is divided into five environmental theme categories and each category has designated questions which address environmental issues. These themes are: • Waste and pollution management • Air quality
  15. 15. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 15 of 69 • Water management • Biodiversity management • Land use planning. 3.1.5 Proposed IEP Methodology The IEP Process runs parallel to the IDP Process and should ultimately culminate with Phase 4 when the various Sector Plans and Programmes are integrated. The IDP Guide Packs do not recommend detailed processes and guidance on how an IEP should be generated. The general intent is that the IEP should guide strategic and project level developmental and planning decision making. The Centre for Environmental Management proposes the process and evaluation criteria as presented in Figure 7. The first step entails the evaluation of environmental issues identified during Phase 1 of the IDP Process in terms of specialist review and input, procedural fit as well as legal conformance. • The second step would be to evaluate proposed IDP strategies in terms of their conformance to identified issues (Step1), conformance to overarching policy as well as legal and other strategic environmental guidelines such as: o Agenda 21 o NEMA Chapter 1 Principles o Provincial EMP and EIP o and others • Step three involves the evaluation of identified projects for conformance todefined and proposed IDP strategies, their relevance and completeness aswell as compliance to legal requirements. • Step four involves the generation of an IEP status report that defines conformance and improvement opportunities for the Mangaung IDP Process and documents that will enable politicians and officials to generate a dedicated IEP that meets the Local Municipality’s political, administrative, financial as well as sustainability obligations • Step five culminates with the generation of an environmental performance assessment roadmap that will ensure that all the subsequent reviews of the IDP and IEP are in conformance to environmental parameters.
  16. 16. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 16 of 69 4. LOCAL ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ISSUES Apart from the potential environmental issues extracted from the Mangaung IDP, the municipality recently completed its first State of the Environment Report as well as a Environmental Legal Compliance Audit of its functions and facilities. Th e key priority areas and identified issues within these documents were summarised and grouped according to the framework for Environmental Management at Local Authority level during a workshop held on 1 April 2004 with senior management of MLM. 4.1.1 Priority Issues within the IDP Priority Issues within the IDP and its potential impact on the key areas identified within the framework for Environmental Management at Local Authority level: FRAMEWORKRef ISSUES WHICH CAN HAVE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS DURING THE INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN (IDP) Legislation Own Activities/ Infrastructure Support Services Conservation IDP Common approach and programme • IDP Decision making • IDP Public participation • • Ws1 Worker’s right to refuse work in an unhealthy and unsafe environment • • IDP Service Satisfaction • • • IDP Basic services available • • IDP Economic (Municipal) Services • IDP Skills of Workforce • • IDP Information Technology • IDP Poverty Reduction • • IDP Economic Growth • IDP Community Resilience & Self Reliance • • IDP Community based service delivery • • IDP Financial Management (General administrative management) • IDP Civic leadership • • IDP Financed Leveraged • IDP Employment Equity • = primary relation, • = secondary relation
  17. 17. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 17 of 69 4.1.2 Environmental Issues identified within the SOER The table below provides a brief summary of the priority areas within the MLM SOER: FRAMEWORKRef ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES CONFIRMED DURING THE STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT (SOER) Legislation Own Activities/ infrastructure Support Services Conservation SOER Air pollution • • • SOER Vehicle emissions • • • SOER Domestic coal use (fossil fuel use) • • SOER Greenhouse gases • • • SOER Ambient particulate concentrations • • SOER Pesticides and herbicides • • • SOER Agricultural pollution • • SOER Heavy metals • • • SOER Sulphates • • • SOER Illegal dumping • • SOER Hazardous waste • • • SOER Housing • • • SOER Control of illegal activities • • • SOER Governance of policies, plans and programs • • • SOER Cultural heritage • • SOER Capacity of landfills • • • • SOER Suitability of landfills • • • SOER Waste minimization and recycling • • • • SOER Adequate waste collection services • • • SOER Fulfillment of legal duties • • • SOER Environmental awareness and education • • • Ws1 Control of legal activities • • • SOER Voluntary environmental auditing • • • SOER Waste generation • • • • SOER Coal fired power station • • • • Ws1 Water consumption (internal) • SOER Access to water • • • Ws1 Storm water management • • SOER Access to services and infrastructure • • • SOER Extent of conservation areas • • • • SOER Water consumption (domestic) • • • SOER Economic use of biodiversity • • SOER Resources value of conservation areas • • SOER Economic growth • •
  18. 18. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 18 of 69 FRAMEWORKRef ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES CONFIRMED DURING THE STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT (SOER) Legislation Own Activities/ infrastructure Support Services Conservation SOER Unemployment • • SOER Education and literacy • • SOER HIV/Aids • • SOER Riparian vegetation • • • • SOER Alien plant species • • • SOER Conflicting land uses • • • SOER Shortage of residential land • • • SOER Degradation of soil resources • • • SOER Soil erosion • • • • SOER Overgrazing • • • SOER Overuse of agrochemicals • SOER Loss of biodiversity • • • SOER Threatened species • • • SOER Spread of alien species • • SOER Habitat fragmentation • • • SOER Odours • • • • SOER Respiratory health problems SOER Population development • • • = primary relation, • = secondary relation 4.1.3 Environmental Issues identified during the Environmental Legal Audit The table below provides a brief summary of the priority areas within the MLM Audit: FRAMEWORKRef ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IDENTIFIED DURING THE LEGAL COMPLIANCE AUDIT (LCA) Legislation Own Activities/ Infrastructure Support Services Conservation LCA Out dated by-laws • • LCA Register of all environmental legislation (regulator and regulated) • • LCA Functions and responsibilities of Executive Directors to environmental legislation • • LCA Integrated Waste Management Planning in terms of the IDP • LCA Procedures that require approval under environmental legislation • • • LCA Bloem Water nominated by MLM as water • •
  19. 19. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 19 of 69 FRAMEWORKRef ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IDENTIFIED DURING THE LEGAL COMPLIANCE AUDIT (LCA) Legislation Own Activities/ Infrastructure Support Services Conservation service provider in Thaba Nchu LCA Execution of the requirements of the smoke control regulations • LCA Prevent and monitor ground water pollution by underground fuel storage tanks • LCA Rehabilitation of the quarry in Botchabelo (disused and no rehab. planned / permit) • LCA Reporting of emergency incidents to all required organizations • LCA Fire protection plans • LCA Building plan for alterations must be submitted to Emergency Services • LCA Member of Fire Protection Associations • LCA Uncontrolled grazing by livestock • • • LCA Knowledge of National Heritage Resources • • LCA Awareness of employees of criminal and civil liabilities with regard to environmental pollution • LCA No EIA for Heidedal depot • • LCA EIA must be considered during Rezoning applications • • LCA Validity of the EMP for Petra quarry • • • LCA Water taken from Masselspoort, Rustfontein, Welbedacht and Knelpoort dams as well as boreholes at Loch Logan (permits for extraction) • • LCA Storage of water at Maselspoort, Mockes dam, Loch Logan, Blue and Red dam (permits) • • LCA Water uses at the Thaba Nchu and Welvaart sewage treatment works • • LCA Transportation of bulk fuel to mechanical workshop • • LCA Registration of the sewage purification works at Thaba Nchu • • LCA Qualifications of staff at the sewage purification works at Thaba Nchu • • LCA Closure permit for the disused waste disposal site at Thaba Nchu • • LCA Communal septic tanks (permit) • • LCA Compliance of the mechanical Workshop with bulk storage of fuel legislation • LCA Handling and storage of Hazardous Chemical • •
  20. 20. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 20 of 69 FRAMEWORKRef ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IDENTIFIED DURING THE LEGAL COMPLIANCE AUDIT (LCA) Legislation Own Activities/ Infrastructure Support Services Conservation Substances LCA Cleaning of vehicles containing Hazardous Chemical Substances • • • LCA Inventory of location of asbestos for all premises • LCA Handling of pesticides by registered person • • LCA Certificates for scheduled processes at power station and crematorium • LCA Burning of tyres at Suidstort • LCA Burning of vegetative waste by Parks and Cemeteries • LCA Disposal of asbestos and pesticides • LCA Control at Suidstort • LCA Surface water at fresh produce market • LCA Separation between fresh and dirty water systems at Suidstort and the fresh produce market • LCA Surface and ground water pollution: underground fuel storage tanks, cemeteries, sewage purification works • LCA Pollution at Thaba Nchu cemetery • LCA Firebrakes • • LCA Control of Parks, POS and Public Amenities • • LCA Registered as water users: Bore holes and storage at Loch Logan, Thaba Nchu and Botshabelo sewage treatment works, irrigation of waste water at the Botshabelo sewage treatment works • • LCA Environmental issues to be taken into consideration in the Economic Development Strategy • • LCA Recreational use of Loch Logan • • LCA Domestic waste water in area of more than 5000 house holds make use of on-site disposal facilities (permits) • • LCA On-site disposal facilities exceeds 10 per ha (permit) • • LCA Eradication category 1, 2 and 3 plants • • • = primary relation, • = secondary relation
  21. 21. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 21 of 69 During the said workshop, a brief discussion of the above issues indicated the following underlying and potential environmental issues to be considered: Issue No Ref. Issue Description E1 IDP, LCA Adherence to procedures that require approval under environmental legislation Compliance with environmental legislation, regulations and procedures that require environmental authorisation during all service delivery actions and activities.. E2 LCA Out dated by-laws By-laws must be kept updated and relevant E3 LCA Registering of all applicable environmental legislation (regulator and regulated) A register of all environmental legislation by means which the MLM is being regulated must be kept, the register must also contain all authorizations that have been issued to the MLM. E4 LCA Monitoring Environmental Authorisations Registering and monitoring of of all activities (public and private) which require(d) environmental authorisations. E5 LCA Legal handling of Hazardous Chemical Substances Compliance with legislation in regards to the storage, handling, transporting and disposal of Hazardous Chemical Substances E6 LCA Legislation on Asbestos in buildings Compliance with legislation in regards to the storage, handling, transporting and disposal of asbestos. E7 LCA Legislation on us e of Pesticides Compliance with legislation in regards to the storage, handling, transporting and disposal of pesticides E8 LCA Smoke control regulations The requirements of the smoke control regulations must be executed and adhered to, to prevent illegal emissions. E9 IDP Energy efficiency at all facilities Energy efficiency of current facilities and equipment used. E10 IDP Minimizing pollution generated at all facilities Minimizing the pollution impacts at all facilities E11 LCA Validity of the EMP’s for quarries The validity of EMP’s for quarries is subject to conditions and timeframes. E12 LCA Permits for water use Permits for water use (e.g. recreational), storage (e.g. dams, reservoirs), extraction (e.g. bore holes) must be obtained from the relevant authorities. Water service providers must be registered. E13 LCA On-site disposal facilities Permits for the concentration of on-site disposal facilities and communal septic tanks must be obtained E14 LCA Registration of Sewage purification works Registration of the sewage purification works and qualifications of staff working at the sewage purification works must comply with standards E15 LCA Scheduled burning processes at power station & crematorium Scheduled processes at the power station and crematorium must comply with standards and be certified. E16 IDP, LCA Environmental checklists for all service activities Incorporation of environmental management procedures and regulation within the implementation of all services delivery aspects eg. Economic Development Strategy.
  22. 22. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 22 of 69 Issue No Ref. Issue Description E17 LCA Environmental Functions and responsibilities of Executive Directors Delegations issued to Executive Directors must reflect environmental legislation in their functions and responsibilities. E18 SOER Monitoring of water consumption Domestic and internal water use must be monitored and the access to water must be in line with the service provision requirements. E19 SOER Responsible land uses Land uses must be complimentary and environmentally sensitive planning must provide coefficient residential land E20 LCA, SOER Integrated Waste Management Planning The integrated management of waste is of utmost importance. Waste generation must be limited, legal dumping sites must be managed and illegal dumping must be prevented. The IDP specifically set key performance indicators for Integrated Waste Management Planning. E21 SOER Water pollution Water pollution due to pesticides, herbicides, agricultural activities, heavy metals and sulphates E22 SOER Air pollution Air pollution due to vehicle emissions, domestic coal use (fossil fuel use) contribute to odors, Green House gases, respiratory health problems and high ambient particulate concentrations E23 SOER Loss of biodiversity The loss of biodiversity is visible in the number of threatened species located in the MLM area, the spreading of alien and invader species, and habitat fragmentation due to a lack of functional open space systems. E24 SOER Economic use of biodiversity The number and size of conservation areas must reiterate the economic value of biodiversity. E25 SOER Control of invader species Vegetation, including riparian vegetation, is in danger of alien and invader species as well as over grazing and erosion. Alien species in general must be eradicated. E26 SOER Conservation of soil resources Degradation of soil resources takes place be means of poor storm water management, erosion, pollution, Overuse of agrochemicals and salinity. E27 SOER Conservation of cultural heritage resources A lack of knowledge concerning cultural heritage is endangering the protection of the cultural heritage resources. E28 IDP Public participation in all environmental decision making processes Public participation during decision making processes required by environmental legislation. E29 IDP, SOER Public ownership of environmental resources The best way of protecting the environment is through partnership with organised and civil society. E30 IDP Environmental health rights of all personnel Knowledge of municipal personnel regarding their environmental rights. E31 IDP Environmental education and skills development personnel Skills of municipal personnel to execute their tasks in an environmentally sustainable manner.
  23. 23. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 23 of 69 Issue No Ref. Issue Description E32 IDP, SOER Public Environmental Education Every citizen should be empowered to contribute to environmental conservation within their environment. 5. ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGIES Within the Managung IDP various programmes were identified to dirve the execution of the key priorities within the IDP. One such programme was identified as the “Clean Environment” programme. Under this programme the main environmental issues and strategies are to be addressed. The Clean Environment Programme has the following development objective: By 2006 we will have an attractive environment in Mangaung with clean, well-kept natural open spaces, parks and a well maintained built environment. In pursuit of the above objective, the following strategies where formulated within the IDP: No IDP Code Strategy S1 Env 1 Development of an Integrated Environmental Management Plan (IEMP). S2 Env 2 To increase the volume of waste collected to weekly collections with 10% recycled by 2006. S3 Env 3 To establish an environmental education system which will also address personal and community involvement to ensure a clean environment. S4 Env 4 To reduce air pollution from coal fires and dust particularly during winter months. S5 Env 5 To promote clean energy sources S6 Env 6 To reduce pollution from industrial and hazardous waste on land and in streams to below safe levels. S7 Env 7 To provide adequate public sanitation facilities where people congregate. S8 Env 8 To reduce levels of water pollution through sewage contamination. S9 Env 9 To reduce levels of animal waste in suburbs, particularly pigs and dogs. S10 Env 10 To revise standards and methods of park classification and ensure maintenance of parks to this standard. S11 Env 11 To develop 5 parks in Thaba Nchu, Botshabelo and Mangaung townships. S12 Env 12 To ensure that basic supporting infrastructure (roads) are well maintained. S13 Env 13 To develop an efficient and safe public transport system. S14 Env 14 Enforcement of by-laws to ensure clean environment.
  24. 24. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 24 of 69 In view of the extensive list of environmental issues listed from the IDP, the State of the Environment Report as well as the Legal Compliance Audit, it is important to consider whether these strategies would address all the environmental issues.
  25. 25. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 25 of 69 The table below provides a brief summary of the level to which existing strategies would address the identified environmental issues. ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGIES (Refer to section ___ for more detailed description) Ref S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S10 S11 S12 S13 S14 E1 E2 E3 E4 E5 E6 E7 E8 E9 E10 E11 E12 E13 E14 E15 E16 E17 E18 E19 E20 E21 E22 E23 E24 E25 E26 E27 E28 E29 E30 E31 E32 ENVIRONMNETALISSUES (Refertosection____fordetaileddescription) Direct Linkages Indirect Linkages No linkage The additional strategies and associated projects area indicated below:
  26. 26. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 26 of 69 5.1. LEGISLATION (Regulated) 5.1.1 NON-COMPLIANCE TO ENVIRONMENTAL PROCEDURES MLM does not comply with all environmental legislation, regulations and procedures that require environmental authorisation during all service delivery actions and activities. This no-compliance places the municipality and the environment at risk. • Lack of information • Lack of management control • Absence of structure • Lack of access to the law • Lack of knowledge of requirements. • Lack of skills to adhere to all regulations. • Set in old ways and procedures. • No monitoring of municipal requirements. • Lack of exposure to environmental forums. • Absence of central co-ordinating agent (Champion) • Lack of Resources. • Lack of knowledge regarding correct procedures. • Lack of knowledge regarding correct procedures. • Pesticides handled by unqualified persons. • Lack of control measures and procedures for pesticides. Objective 1: To ensure legal compliance by all (council, employees, contractors) for all its activities, products and services. The key strategies are: Ÿ By frequently monitoring the legal compliance of the municipality to external legislation and regulations [EMU 1.1.8.]. Ÿ By centrally monitoring the municipal compliance to EIA Regulations. Ÿ By enforcement of standards and by-laws to ensure clean environment [IDP S14]. Ÿ By lobbying for devolution to municipality of provincial powers as well as relevant funding in terms of identified listed activities [EMU 1.1.3]. Ÿ By constantly monitoring and collecting new environmental policies, regulations and legislation. Ÿ By ensuring that all employees have access to environmental information, policies, by-laws and regulations. Ÿ By identifying and monitoring all areas where Hazardous Chemical Substances are stored, handled, transported and disposed of.
  27. 27. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 27 of 69 Ÿ By monitoring permits for storage, handling, transporting and disposal of Hazardous Chemical Substances. Ÿ By ensuring sufficient regional Hazmat response measures. Ÿ By ensuring that personnel and the general public understands the dangers associated with Hazardous Chemical Substances Ÿ By identifying and monitoring all areas where asbestos are stored, handled, transported and disposed of. Ÿ By systematically eradicating asbestos from municipal facilities and buildings. Ÿ By ensuring that personnel and the general public understands the dangers associated with the long-term exposure to asbestos. Ÿ By identifying and monitoring all areas where pesticides are stored, handled, transported and disposed of. Ÿ By training key personnel in proper use of pesticides. Project No. Programme Project 1.1. ORGP Multi-stakeholder forum to deliver on the actions references on the focus areas 1.2. REGP Frequent Environmental Legal Compliance Audits [EMU 1.1.8]. 1.3. REGP Monitoring programme of required EIA procedures [EMU 1.1.2]. 1.4. STGP Development of EIA process guidelines and departmental manuals [EMU 1.1.4]. 1.5. REGP EMU to develop EIA reports on behalf of MLM [EMU 1.1.11]. 1.6. REGP Central register and library of environmental legislation. 1.7. LAWP Interpretation and dissemination of all environmental policies and bylaws to various service units [EMU 2.1.2]. 1.8. REGP Identify all potential risk areas. 1.9. REGP Central register of all past and current permits for hazardous materials (both internally and externally). 1.10. STGP Hazmat response plan. 1.11. REGP Identify all potential risk areas. 1.12. RHBP Schedule for the eradication of asbestos from municipal facilities. 1.13. PATP Public awareness campaign on dangers of asbestos. 1.14. REGP Identify all potential risk areas. 1.15. STGP Municipal protocols for handling of pesticides. 1.16. PATP Training programme for key personnel. 5.2. LEGISLATION (REGULATOR) 5.2.1 OUT DATED BY LAWS Current by-laws are either out dated or does not address the issues. This results in a lack of proper localised regulations and non-enforcement.
  28. 28. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 28 of 69 • Lack of knowledge of proper and comprehensive environmental management requirements. • Lack of policy basis for extensive by-laws. • Ad-hoc updating of by-laws. • Absence of central co-ordinating agent. • Importance of authorisations are not realised by roleplayers. • Municipality is often by-passed ito. authorisations. • Provincial authorities lack resources to effectively monitor authorisation. • Lack of knowledge regarding alternative energies. • Poverty leaving very little alternatives. • Lack of resources for enforcement. • Inadequate policy • Translate policy to effective bylaws • Inadequate structure and capacity to implement bylaws • No structure and capacity to reinforce bylaws • Lack of communication of bylaws • Unfunded mandates • Timeous review and upgrade of existing policies and bylaws • Policies and laws are not updated according to developments in legislation • Poor enforcement of policies that are in line with new developments in MLM / broader legal framework Objective 2: To ensure sufficient suite of local environmental bylaws and effective enforcement thereof. The key strategies are: • By development of relevant policies towards e.g. Authorisations, Inspections, Wetlands, etc. [EMU 2.1.5]. • By enforcement of by-laws to ensure clean environment [IDP S14]. • By incorporating an update cycle for bylaws into IDP and IEP review process. • By lobbying for devolution to municipality of provincial powers as well as relevant funding in terms of identified listed activities [EMU 1.1.3]. • By ensuring that all procedureswithin the MLM that approve activities include environmental authorisation process. • By ensuring that all activities of the MLM listed in terms of the Regulations of the Environmental Conservation’s Act must be accompanied by EIA’s. • By reducing air pollution from coal fires and dust particularly during winter months [IDP Env4]. • By researching alternative energy solutions for households. • By ensuring that municipal facilities and equipment adhere to Smoke Control Regulations.
  29. 29. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 29 of 69 Project No. Project Programme 2.1. Formulation and dissemination of environmental policies [EMU 2.1.2,5&6]. LAWP 2.2. Environmental law enforcement programme. LAWP 2.3. Guidelines for cyclic updating of environmental by-laws. STGP 2.4. Development of EIA process guidelines and departmental manuals [EMU 1.1.4]. STGP 2.5. Frequent Environmental Legal Compliance Audits [EMU 1.1.8]. REGP 2.6. Central register of all past and current authorisations (both internally and externally). REGP 2.7. Alternative energies programme. STRP 2.8. Public awareness campaign on alternative energies and dust reduction. PATP 2.9. Investigate and monitor smoke control at municipal facilities. REGP 5.3. OWN ACTIVITIES / INFRASTRUCTURE 5.3.1 ENERGY EFFICIENCY OF MUNICIPAL FACILITIES Current facilities are not always energy efficient and old technologies are used. This causes high running costs and leads to energy wastage and air pollution. • Old and familiar technologies in place. • Lack of resources for implementation. • Limited renewable energy sources in area. • Infrastructure is not always energy efficient Objective 3: To improve energy efficiency of existing facilities where possible, but continually ensure that new facilities are energy efficient. The key strategies are: • By promoting clean energy sourcesacross the municipality [IDP Env5]. • By encouraging the use of energy saving devises in existing, new and upgraded developments [EMU 2.2.7] • By promoting energy efficient architecture and design for upgrading existing facilities and development of new facilities. Project No. Project Programme 3.1. Alternative energies programme. STGP 3.2. Training of personnel on energy saving devises. PATP
  30. 30. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 30 of 69 3.3. Energy saving devises as standard practice e.g. energy efficient street lamps. EQPP 3.4. Develop standards on energy efficiency and link them to approval of building plans for extensions and new developments. STGP 5.3.2 POLLUTION LEVELS AT MUNICIPAL FACILITIES Certain municipal facilities contribute significantly towards surrounding water, ground and surface water and air pollution. • Shortage of space or alternatives for disposal of waste. • Lack of house-keeping • Spillages of chemical substances (especially servicing of vehicles in uncontrolled workshops) • Lack of control on dust contamination and storm water run-off Objective 4: To have municipal buildings that area clean and not contributing to the pollution of surrounding areas. The key strategies are: • By formulating and implementing measures for the minimization of waste at municipal facilities. • By creating special waste collection and schedules for waste generated at own facilities • By establishing or sourcing facilities for disposal of hazardous waste generated at own facilities Project No. Project Programme 4.1. Identifyall potential risk areas REGP 4.2. Sufficient waste collection schedule. STGP 4.3. Municipal waste reduction strategy and implementation plan at each facility. STGP 4.4. Capabilities and facilities to deal with hazardous waste PATP / EQPP 4.5. Infrastructure upgrade at high risk facilities both for waste collection areas and dust and storm water problem EQPP 5.3.3 AUTHORIZATIONS AT OWN FACILTIES Insufficient compliance and knowledge of authorization at own facilities which could lead to pollution and legal liabilities. • Lack of knowledge of legal requirements of activities. • Lack of knowledge of regulations.
  31. 31. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 31 of 69 • Rapid urbanisation and densification. • Lenient development standards. • Inherited infrastructure during amalgamation. • Internal audit process does not yet address legal compliance of municipal activities • Lack of knowledge of standards. • Lack of resources to implement standards. Objective 5: To have all own facilities authorised in terms of legislation and to ensure compliance to the conditions of the authorisations. The key strategies are: • By determining where Environmental Management Plans are required and have been developed and implemented. • By constantly evaluating compliance with Environmental Management Plans in terms of environmental standards and regulations [ EMU 1.1.5]. • By obtaining the necessary water use authorization for all municipal water uses from the relevant authorities. • By ensuring that all water service providers are registered with the municipality. • By ensuring that areas where on-site disposal facilities and communal septic tanks are located are identified and authorizations obtained for these areas. By creating development standardsto prevent the concentration of on-site disposal. facilities • By upgrading sewage purification works where required to comply with legislation. • By registering all sewage purification works according to regulations. • By ensuring that all staff working at all municipal facilities are properly trained and in possession of the necessary certificates. • By upgrading power plant facilities where required to adhere to standards. • By identifying and certifying all scheduled processes at the power station and crematorium to comply with standards. • By ensuring that the internal audit process addresses the legal compliance of all municipal activities Project No. Project Programme 5.1. EMP Monitoring programme [EMU 1.1.6]. REGP 5.2. Check all municipal quarry EMPs for validity. REGP 5.3. Audit compliance with authorization of all municipal facilities (quarries, disposal sites and sewage works ) LAWP 5.4. Valid municipal permits for water uses obtained from authorities. LAWP 5.5. Registering of all water service providers. REGP
  32. 32. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 32 of 69 5.6. Upgrade all municipal facilities, which are not in compliance with authorization conditions. EQPP 5.7. Identify areas of on-site disposal concentration. REGP 5.8. Monitor compliance with authorizations for on-site disposal and septic tanks. REGP 5.9. Develop technical standards to avoid concentration of on-site disposal. STGP 5.10. Registration of all sewage purification works not registered. REGP 5.11. Training of staff to required standards. PATP 5.12. Identify all scheduled processes REGP 5.13. Schedule for potential upgrading of facilities. EQPP 5.14. Certification of scheduled processes. LAWP 5.15. Monitoring of scheduled processes. REGP 5.4. SUPPORT SERVICES 5.4.1 INSUFFICIENT ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES IN SERVICE DELIVERY PROCESSES Service delivery and development processes does not always incorporate environmental management procedure as part of the execution. This could cause development to be unsustainable and counter develop as much as develop. • Poverty places priority on development before environmental management. • Economic activities are often seen as opposing environmental management. Objective 6: To ensure that all the roleplayers (e.g. workers and developers) are aware of the environmental issues by 2005. The key strategies are: • By frequently reporting on the sustainability of development and services within MLM [EMU 2.2.3]. • By Incorporating environmental issues, procedures and regulation in all service and land planning procedures[EMU 2.2.5]. • By incorporating environmental objectives into all IDP Sector plans [EMU 2.1.17]. • By developing minimum environmental standards for the Mangaung Local Municipality [EMU 2.1.7]. • By developing, promoting & adopting an Environmental Management System (EMS) such as ISO14001 within MLM [EMU 2.1.11]. Project No. Project Programme 6.1. Integrated Environmental Policy for MLM [EMU 2.1.3]. LAWP 6.2. Minimum Environmental Standards for MLM [EMU 2.1.7]. STGP 6.3. Environmental Management System [EMU 2.1.11]. STGP 6.4. Strategic Environmental Management Plan (SEMP) [EMU 2.1.16]. STGP
  33. 33. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 33 of 69 6.5. Strategic Environmental Assessments (SEA) [EMU 2.1.19 STGP 6.6. Evaluate all sector plans (LED Programme) for Environmental issues [EMU 1.1.7]. STGP 5.4.2 UNDEFINED ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITIES OF EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS Delegations issued to Executive Directors does not reflect environmental legislation in their functions and responsibilities. Non-inclusion of environmental legal obligations in delegation of powers to management. • Unco-ordinated focus of environmental efforts before Environmental Management Unit. • Lack of knowledge of the existing environmental legislation Objective 7: Establish a dedicated environmental unit with knowledgeable personnel with appropriate delegated powers by end of 2004. The key strategies are: • By incorporating environmental responsibilities ito. Legislation and functions into post descriptions and evaluation criteria of senior management. Project No. Project Programme 7.1. Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP) for MLM [EMU 2.1.4]. STGP 7.2. Environmental inputs into post descriptions. ORGP 5.4.3 MONITORING OF WATER CONSUMPTION The ability to provide water to the required standard levels is affected by the level of water consumption (or water wastage) and should therefore by monitored to be managed effectively. • Domestic and industrial water wastage. • Lack of resources to monitor entire network. • Water leakages. Objective 8: To have a sensitized community in terms of water usage. The key strategies are: • By reducing levels of water pollution through sewage contamination [IDP Env8].
  34. 34. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 34 of 69 • By encouraging the use of water saving devisesin existing, new and upgraded developments [EMU 2.2.9]. • By monitoring domestic and municipal water use in order to optimize water availability. • By ensuring that the access to water is in line with the service provision requirements of the Government Project No. Project Progarmme 8.1. Water saving campaign including education and water saving devices. PATP 8.2. Water consumption monitoring through metering and permit for extraction REGP 5.4.4 UNREGULATED AND IRRESPONSIBLE LAND USES Non-environmentally sensitive planning of neighbourhoods and the constant pressure of development in lower use and sensitive areas leads to the pollution and loss of land resources. • Profit driven development. • Addressing poverty. • Change of market areas and districts. • Political opportunism • Criminality (save havens – illegally cut plots for people to shield them) Objective 9: Regulation of land use and enforcement of usage of land in terms of scheme regulations. The key strategies are: • By ensuring that strong environmental standards are incorporated within planning and development standards. • By providing a clear strategic development framework for municipal open spaces. • By providing guidelines and standards for sustainable development practices. • By enforcing EIA regulations during all development procedures. Project No. Project Programme 9.1. Environmental standards incorporated within development standards. STGP 9.2. Urban Open Space Framework STGP 9.3. Enforcing EIA regulations during developments. LAWP
  35. 35. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 35 of 69 5.5. CONSERVATION 5.5.1 WASTE REDUCTION AND MANAGE MENT Increased waste volumes and the controlled and uncontrolled disposal thereof places tremendous pressure on all environmental resources. Effective management of these environmental resources will require waste reduction and waste management. Integrated waste management (cradle to grave concept). • Illegal dumping of waste. • Lack of motivation by residents to reduce waste. • Limited resources • Poor compaction and covering with soil leads to wind distribution and pollution of environment. • No access control at waste sites • Poor access to waste/dumping sites. • Lack of waste management strategy / IWMP • Lack of knowledge. Objective 10: To implement the National Waste Management System (NWMS) at a local level. The key strategies are: • By increasing the volume of waste collected to weekly collections with 10% recycled by 2006 [IDP Env2]. • By enforcing local compliance with all applicable legislation [EMU 1.2.7]. • By educating and training the community around the issue of waste disposal and the effects it can have on the environment and health conditions. • By ensuring that any person dealing with waste at least meet the minimum requirements and standards as set by DWAF; • By formulating and implementing waste related by -laws; • By promoting recycling amongst all citizens. • By ensuring that waste is disposed of at a properly designed and operated landfill areas which are permitted by DWAF; • By ensuring constant maintenance of waste removal and compaction equipment. • By providing more refuse bins or skips. • By implementing community based and driven clean-up projects. • By implement the polluter pays principle.
  36. 36. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 36 of 69 5.5.2 WATER POLLUTION Water pollution due to pesticides, herbicides, agricultural activities, heavy metals and sulphates. • Illegal dumping of waste into rivers, stormwater gutters etc; • Dirty washing water, which is thrown away in the river or street and is then washed into nearby streams when it rains. • Industrial and municipal sewerage water gets directly dumped into rivers. • Limited waste removal service exist in some areas. • People living on the river banks as well as removal of vegetation along rivers. • Effluents from sewerage treatment works and industries might reach water resources. • Irresponsible use of fertilizers and pesticides. • Underground water pollution from waste disposal sites • Dumping of raw sewage at waste disposal sites • Potential for groundwater pollution in low density areas e.g. small holdings if density is increased Objective 11: To reduce the overall water pollution in all areas to the municipality. The key strategies are: • By reducing levels of water pollution through sewage contamination [IDP Env8]. • By enforcing local compliance with all applicable legislation [EMU 1.2.7]. • By ensuring that the national information system and protocols are adhered to and reported accordingly to provincial government [EMU 1.2.9]. • By training and educating the community on water conservation. • By protecting river edge vegetation in order to protect the river system against pollution and to assist in flood prevention. • By actively promoting the prevention of overgrazing. • By establishing an open space system that incorporates watercourses etc. • Managing waste responsibly. Project No. Project Programme 11.1. Frequent State of the Environment Reports [EMU 2.1.18]. REGP 11.2. Legislative enforcement programme [EMU 1.2.7]. LAWP 11.3. Public awareness campaign on water conservation. PATP 11.4. Awareness raising i.t.o waste management PATP 11.5. Education on handling and disposal of pesticides and herbicides PATP
  37. 37. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 37 of 69 5.5.3 AIR POLLUTION Air pollution is increasing in certain zones and contributes to odours, Green House gases, high ambient particulate concentrations and respiratory health problems. • Lack of electricity leading to burning of coal and fuel wood. • Smog from burning of tyres and domestic waste. • Dust from agricultural lands and gravel roads. • Veld fires. • Odours from abattoirs and other industries. • Stock kraals situated within residential areas. • Emissions from industrial processes. • Incineration of medical waste e.g. at Universitas Hospital. • Lack of safe, affordable and reliable public transport leading to higher levels of vehicle emissions. • People not educated or motivated towards reducing air pollution. • Improve public transport systems Objective 12: To minimize air pollution (prevent and reduce) in MLM through control of acts causing air pollution. The key strategies are: • To have & ensure compliance with appropriate bylaws on air pollution • By ensuring that the national information system and protocols are adhered to and reported accordingly to provincial govern • ment [EMU 1.2.9]. • By promoting local research and development programmes in line with the national air quality framework [EMU 1.2.10]. • By evaluating environmental impact assessments and implementing management plans where required. • By monitoring air pollution constantly. • By training and education residents on air pollution sources and reduction. • By electrifying and providing affordable electricity to areas that are still without electricity. • By promoting the use of smokeless stoves. • By preventing veld fires through fire associations and breaker areas. • By enforcing applicable legislation and formulating appropriate local by laws. Prohibit domestic waste burning • By encouraging the use of energy saving devisesin existing, new and upgraded developments [EMU 2.2.7].
  38. 38. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 38 of 69 • Upgrade gravel roads in dense areas • Project No. Project Programme 12.1. Specific policies, bylaws and guidelines on Air Quality Control [EMU 1.2.8]. STGP / LAWP 12.2. Ambient Air Quality and noise nuisances Research and Monitoring Programme [EMU 1.2.4,5,10,11&13]. REGP 12.3. Emission licensing for Controlled Processes [EMU 1.2.6]. LAWP 12.4. Environmental education and public awareness programme on air quality management and energy conservation [EMU 1.2.3 & 2.2.8]. PATP 12.5. Promotion of energy efficient heating and lighting. (also E09) EQPP 12.6. Implement & monitor of veld fires management plan Enforcement of Environmental Legislation and local bylaws [EMU 1.2.15] STGP / REGP 12.7. Formulation of Local By Laws. LAWP 12.8. Specific policies, standards, and guidelines on Air Quality and noise nuisance Management and Control [EMU 1.2.8, 11 & 2.1.9]. STGP / LAWP 12.9. Air quality management in State of the Environment Reports [EMU 1.2.2. & 2.1.18]. REGP 5.5.4 LOSS OF BIODIVERSITY The loss of biodiversity is visible in the number of threatened species located in the MLM area, the spreading of alien and invader species, and habitat fragmentation due to a lack of functional open space systems. • Unsustainable agricultural practices. • High frequency of veld fires. • Introduction of alien species and natural alien invation. • Lack of legislation enforcement. • Unsustainable use of natural resources. • Overexploitation of plants with medicinal value. • Lack of knowledge regarding the environment. • Lack of functional open space systems. • Uncontrolled green field development • Increase in pollution • Encroaching of urban areas. • Resources not employed to protect biodiversity Objective 13: To ensure the protection of habitats that would facilitate improved bio-diversity.
  39. 39. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 39 of 69 The key strategies are: • By revising standards and methods of park classification. • Ensure maintenance of parks to this standard [IDP Env10]. • By facilitating the rehabilitation of environmentally disturbed areas in the Mangaung Loc al Municipality through the implementation of relevant legislation and co-operation with other relevant role players [EMU 1.1.10]. • By defining and declaring sensitive and specially demarcated areas for control and conservation [2.1.15]. • By conducting environmental impact assessment and formulating management plans where required. • By removing alien species. • By preventing veld fires especially the high frequency at which they sometimes occur. • By implementing a functional open space system. • Project No. Project Programme 13.1. State of the Environment Reports [EMU 2.1.18]. to address specie diversity in municipality. REGP 13.2. Rehabilitation and conservation programme [EMU 1.1.10]. RHBP 13.3. Urban Open Space System. develop STRP 13.4. Public conservancies encouraged. CONP 13.5. Programme for the removal of alien species. CONP 5.5.5 ECONOMIC USE OF BIODIVERSITY Natural habitats and general biodiversity are used for economic activities which increases their usefulness and value, but care need to be taken not to overuse or misuse these areas. • Poverty leads to the over utilisation of biodiversity. • Rigid protection leads to the non-utilisation of biodiverstiy and thus the non-function thereof. • The drive for profit • Lack of awareness Objective 14: To ensure that by 2007 environmental / natural resources are not over utilised for economic purposes. The key strategies are: Ÿ By co-ordinating the development of environmental economic instruments for the Mangaung Local Municipality [EMU 2.1.8].
  40. 40. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 40 of 69 Ÿ By formulating standards and methods of open space classification and ensure management and maintenance of open spaces to acceptable standards. Ÿ By identifying and involving all stakeholders in the process of policy formulation. Project No. Project Programme 14.1. Frequent State of the Environment Reports [EMU 2.1.18]. REGP 14.2. Incorporate use of bio-diversity resources into LED Programme STGP 14.3. Effective Management of open spaces used for social and economic purposes. MANP 5.5.6 INSUFFICIENT CONTROL OF INVADER PLANT SPECIES Vegetation, including riparian vegetation, is in danger of alien and invader species. • Lack of knowledge of species. • Lack of resources to eradicate alien species. • Large corps of alien species on private land. Objective 15: To ensure that by 2007 sufficient control measures are in place for the eradication of invader plant species. The key strategies are: • By identifying and protecting sensitive areas at risk of alien invasion. • By promoting the increase of indigenous species amongst all citizens. Project No. Project Programme 15.1. Frequent State of the Environment Reports [EMU 2.1.18]. REGP 15.2. Alien species eradication programme. CONP 15.3. Promotion of indigenous plants. CONP 5.5.7 DAMAGE AND LOSS OF SOIL RESOURCES Damage and loss of soil resources takes place by means of poor storm water management, erosion, pollution. • Overgrazing. • Areas of high population density. • Poor land management practices. • Vegetation removal on erven as well as removal of vegetation from riverbanks and steep slopes.
  41. 41. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 41 of 69 • Unsustainable utilization of vegetation as a fuel source. • Lack of legislation enforcement. • Poor or lack of effective stormwater management • Drought. Objective 16: To ensure that by 2007 sufficient control measures are in place to prevent damage and loss of soil resources. The key strategies are: Ÿ By ensuring the all procedures within the MLM that approve actions must include environmental authorization process. Ÿ By identifying areas with soil erosion, soil pollution and poor storm water management addressing specific causes. Ÿ By promoting areas with a high possibility for erosion to implement measures like contour farming, buffer strips of natural vegetation etc. to reduce the effect of erosion. Project No. Project Programme 16.1. Frequent State of the Environment Reports [EMU 2.1.18]. REGP 16.2. Soil conservation programme CONP 16.3. Education of all stakeholders PATP 16.4. Emergency measures for times of drought RHBP 5.5.8 DAMAGE AND LOSS OF CULTURAL HERITAGE RESOURCES Cultural heritage resources are constantly under pressure and threat of being lost which affects the social environment. • Lack of respect for culturalresources. • Lack of financial and human resources. • Pressure of developments on areas of cultural and historical significance. • Lack of knowledgeof existence of cultural heritage resources • Not adhering to our legislation responsibilities • Lack of community ownership of cultural heritage resources Objective 17: To ensure that by 2006 sufficient management plans are in place to prevent damage and loss of all cultural heritage resources. The key strategies are:
  42. 42. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 42 of 69 Ÿ By identifying and registering all cultural heritage resources within the municipality. Ÿ By incorporating the management of these resources as part of municipal responsibilities with dedicated service units Ÿ By promoting community ownership through partnerships Project No. Project Programme 17.1. Frequent State of the Environment Reports [EMU 2.1.18]. REGP 17.2. Register of heritage sites. REGP 17.3. Management plans for heritage sites. MANP 17.4. Consideration of heritage sites during development evaluations MANP 17.5. Public participation CBPP 5.6. PUBLIC PARTICIPATION 5.6.1 PUBLIC PARTICIPATION IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING Public participation during environmental decision making processes is not as structured as required by legislation. • Lack of Co-operative governance. • Lack of compliance to legislation. Objective 18: To ensure that by 2006 public participation during environmental decision making processes is structured as required by legisl ation. The key strategies are: Ÿ By subscribing to the principles of co-operative governance. Ÿ By investigating complaints received at the Mangaung Local Municipality, evaluating the relevant activities and to make recommendations on the correct course of action to be taken [EMU 1.1.9]. Ÿ By supporting environmental interest groups and clubs [EMU 2.2.10]. Ÿ By co-ordinating the promotion & adoption of local agenda 21 in the Mangaung Local Municipality [EMU 2.2.2]. Ÿ By co-ordinating & facilitating Access to Environmental Information [EMU 2.2.6]. Project No. Project Programme 18.1. Develop co-operative agreements between organs of state (MOUs) [EMU 2.1.12]. ORGP 18.2. Environmental committee for MLM [EMU 2.2.4]. ORGP
  43. 43. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 43 of 69 18.3. Environmental Management Co-operative Agreements with Industry [EMU 2.1.13]. ORGP 18.4. Local Agenda 21 for MLM [EMU 2.2.2]. CBPP 18.5. Development of and dissemination of Environmental Information Manual [EMU 2.2.6]. STGP 18.6. Celebrate environmental commemorative days [EMU 2.1.13]. PATP 5.6.2 PUBLIC OWNERSHIP OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES Past environmental conservation initiatives proved that success is dependent on public ownership of their environmental resources. • Lack of community involvement in conservation matters • Lack of municipal resources • By supporting environmental interest groups Objective 19: To ensure that by 2006 the community takes ownership of environmental resources. The key strategies are: Ÿ By co-ordinating the promotion & adoption of local agenda 21 in the Mangaung Local Municipality [EMU 2.2.2]. Ÿ By facilitating Environmental Conciliation [EMU 2.1.14]. Ÿ By developing and implementing community environmental policies (SCEP) [EMU 2.2.14] at educational facilities. Project No. Project Programme 19.1. Local Agenda 21 for MLM [EMU 2.2.2]. CBPP 19.2. Education facilities and community environmental policies (SCEP) [EMU 2.2.14]. PATP 19.3. Guidelines, procedures and funding of community based initiatives. STGP 5.7. EDUCATION AND TRAINING 5.7.1 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH RIGHTS OF MUNICIPAL PE RSONNEL Municipal personnel are not always aware of their environmental and occupational health rights which put them at risk. • Lack of knowledge.
  44. 44. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 44 of 69 Objective 20: To ensure that by 2005 all municipal personnel are aware of their environmental and occupational health rights. The key strategies are: Ÿ By establishing an environmental education system. Ÿ By formulating occupation health standards in line with national legislation. Ÿ By creating measures for the control of occupational health standards. Project No. Project Programme 20.1. Occupational health and environmental charter with implementation measures. STGP 5.7.2 ENVIRONMENTAL SKILLS DEVELOPMENT OF MUNICIPAL PERSONNEL Although the municipality is committed to sustainable provision of services, personnel need to be trained in environmental skills for effective implementation. • Lack of environmental skills by personnel Objective 21: To ensure that by 2006 all municipal personnel are sufficiently trained in environmental skills to ensure sustainable service provision. The key strategies are: Ÿ By establishing an environmental skills education system. Ÿ By ensuring training & capacity building of officials in the Mangaung Local Municipality [EMU 2.2.12]. Project No. Project Programme 21.1. Training of Staff [EMU 1.1.1,1.2.1,2.1.1,2.2.1] PATP 21.2. Evaluation of staff in terms of environmental functions ORGP 5.7.3 PUBLIC ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION As the general public and every household is both the largest contributor to environmental degradation and conservation alike, an increase level of awareness and knowledge of the general public towards environmental conservation is essential. • Lack of awareness and knowledge
  45. 45. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 45 of 69 Objective 22: To ensure that by 2007 the general public and every household are made aware of and have knowledge of environmental conservation. The key strategies are: Ÿ By establishing an environmental education system. Ÿ By co-ordinating & facilitating Access to Environmental Information [EMU 2.2.6]. Ÿ By developing environmental education resource material [EMU 2.2.11]. Project No. Project Programme 22.1. Environmental education and public awareness programme. PATP 22.2. Development and dissemination of Environmental Information Manual [EMU 2.2.6]. STGP 22.3. Celebrate environmental commemorative days [EMU 2.1.13]. PATP 22.4. Development and dissemination of Environmental education resource material [EMU 2.2.11]. STGP
  46. 46. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 46 of 69 6. IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMMES To ensure that the formulated strategies and projects are implemented within the available resources and functions of the municipality, it was grouped within ten action or implementation programmes. These programmes will ensure the co-ordination and sharing of resources throughout the Mangaung Municipality toward the co-ordination and sharing of responsibilities and resources during the implementation of the Mangaung Integrated Environmental Plan. The implementation programmes include the following: 1. Research and Registration Programme (REGP) This programme will aim to collect and disseminate quality information on environmental issues through research, listing, registering and mapping such information from a central point. This will also include the monitoring of information on the status of the various issues and activities. 2. Community Based Planning & Management Programme (CBPP) This programme will aim to promote and co-ordinate structured community ownership of their environmental resources. 3. Management Programme (MANP) This programme will aim to constantly manage and control environmental impacts through strategic studies and action frameworks as well as procedural development. 4. Public Awareness and Training Programme (PATP) This programme will aim to create awareness amongst the general public regarding various environmental issues as well as ensure training for both the community as well as specialised training for internal personnel. 5. Standards and Guidelines Programme (STGP) This programme will aim to provide standards, guidelines and /or manuals for any procedural activities to address the environmental issues. 6. Organisational structuring Programme (ORGP) This programme will aim to create effective co-ordinating structures to address the various environmental issues. This will include the formulation, allocation and monitoring of internal responsibilities. 7. Law enforcement Programme (LAWP) This programme will aim to formulate and enforce such policy positions, by laws and law enforcement procedures as is required to address the identified environmental issues.
  47. 47. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 47 of 69 8. Equipment and technology programme (EQPP) This programme will aim to upgrade and replace municipal equipment and technology which are not resource efficient or which might have negative impacts on the environment. 9. Conservation Programme (CONP) This programme will aim to promote, co-ordinate and manage the conservation of resources within the municipal area. 10. Rehabilitation Programme (RHBP) This programme will aim to promote, co-ordinate and manage the rehabilitation of areas which have been degraded within the municipal area.
  48. 48. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 48 of 69 6.1. Research and Registration Programme (REGP) 6.1.1 PURPOSE This programme will aim to collect and disseminate quality information on environmental issues through research, listing, registering and mapping such information from a central point. This will also include the monitoring of information on the status of the various issues and activities 6.1.2 ROLEPLAYERS It is envisaged that a cluster of units and external roleplayers will be key to the implementation of this programme. Specific internal and external roleplayers are listed below: Key MLM Units External Roleplayers Environmental Management Waste Management Water and Sanitation Planning Natural Resource Management GIS Unit Legal Services Department of Tourism, Environmental and Economic Affairs 6.1.3 ACTIVITIES AND PROJECTS This programme will focus on the following main activities: • Central co-ordination legislative information and authorisations; • Environmental Quality Monitoring; • Legal Compliance Auditing, and • State of the Environment Reporting. The relationship between these activities and formulated projects are indicated overleaf. The key responsible MLM unit as well as the priority of the individual projects are also indicated.
  49. 49. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 49 of 69 Research and Registration Programme (REGP) summary of activities: Activities Project No. Project Key MLM Unit Priority 1.9. Central register of all past and current permits for hazardous materials (both internally and externally). Environmental Management A 2.6. Central register of all past and current authorisations (both internally and externally). Environmental Management A 5.10. Registration of all sewage purification works not registered. Water and Sanitation A 5.2. Check all municipal quarry EMPs for validity. Environmental Management A 5.5. Registering of all water service providers. Water and Sanitation B 17.2. Register of heritage sites. Planning B Central co-ordination legislative information and authorisations 1.6. Central register and library of environmental legislation. Environmental Management C 1.3. Monitoring programme of required EIA procedures [EMU 1.1.2]. Environmental Management A 5.1. EMP Monitoring programme [EMU 1.1.6]. Environmental Management A 5.15. Monitoring of scheduled processes. Environmental Management / Waste Management / Water and Sanitation A 5.8. Monitor compliance with authorizations for on-site disposal and septic tanks. Water and Sanitation B 8.2. Water consumption monitoring through metering and permit for extraction Water and Sanitation B 12.2. Ambient Air Quality and noise nuisances Research and Monitoring Programme [EMU 1.2.4,5,10,11&13]. Environmental Management B 12.6. Implement & monitor of veld fires management plan Enforcement of Environmental Legislation and local bylaws [EMU 1.2.15] Natural Resource Management B 2.9. Investigate and monitor smoke control at municipal facilities. Environmental Management B Environmental Quality Monitoring 1.5. EMU to develop EIA reports on behalf of MLM [EMU 1.1.11]. Environmental Management C Legal Compliance Auditing 1.2. & 2.5. Frequent Environmental Legal Compliance Audits [EMU 1.1.8]. Environmental Management A
  50. 50. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 50 of 69 Activities Project No. Project Key MLM Unit Priority 12.9. Air quality management in State of the Environment Reports [EMU 1.2.2. & 2.1.18]. Environmental Management A 11.1. & 13.1. & 14.1, 15.1, 16.1, 17.1 Frequent State of the Environment Reports [EMU 2.1.18]. Environmental Management A 1.8. & 1.11. & 1.14 Identify all potential non-compliance risk areas within municipal facilities. Environmental Management / Waste Management / Water and Sanitation B 4.1. Identify all potential pollution risk areas within municipal facilities. Waste Management B 5.12. Identify all scheduled processes Environmental Management B State of the Environment Reporting 5.7. Identify areas of on-site disposal concentration. Waste Management B
  51. 51. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 51 of 69 6.2. Community Based Planning & Management Programme (CBPP) 6.2.1 PURPOSE This programme will aim to promote and co-ordinate structured community ownership of their environmental resources. 6.2.2 ROLEPLAYERS It is envisaged that a cluster of units and external roleplayers will be key to the implementation of this programme. Specific internal and external roleplayers are listed below: Key MLM Units External Roleplayers Environmental Management Corporate Services Speaker’s Office National Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism 6.2.3 ACTIVITIES AND PROJECTS This programme will focus on the following main activities: • Public Participation in environmental decision making The relationship between these activities and formulated projects are indicated overleaf. The key responsible MLM unit as well as the priority of the individual projects are also indicated.
  52. 52. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 52 of 69 Community Based Planning & Management Programme (CBPP) summary of activities: Activities Project No. Project Key MLM Unit Priority 17.5. Public participation Corporate Services / Environmental Management APublic Participation in environmental decision making 18.4., 19.1 Local Agenda 21 for MLM [EMU 2.2.2]. Environmental Management B
  53. 53. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 53 of 69 6.3. Management Programme (MANP) 6.3.1 PURPOSE This programme will aim to constantly manage and control environmental impacts through strategic studies and action frameworks as well as procedural development. 6.3.2 ROLEPLAYERS It is envisaged that a cluster of units and external roleplayers will be key to the implementation of this programme. Specific internal and external roleplayers are listed below: Key MLM Units External Roleplayers 6.3.3 ACTIVITIES AND PROJECTS This programme will focus on the following main activities: • Co-ordinated Management of natural resources, and • Enforcement of environmental management during development processes. The relationship between these activities and formulated projects are indicated overleaf. The key responsible MLM unit as well as the priority of the individual projects are also indicated.
  54. 54. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 54 of 69 Management Programme (MANP) summary of activities: Activities Project No. Project Key MLM Unit Priority 14.3. Effective Management of open spaces used for social and economic purposes. ACo-ordinated Management of natural resources 17.3. Management plans for heritage sites. A Enforcement of environmental management during development processes 17.4. Consideration of heritage sites during development evaluations A
  55. 55. MLM Integrated Environmental Plan – Draft Report August 2004 © Copyright Reserved Page 55 of 69 6.4. Public Awareness and Training Programme (PATP) 6.4.1 PURPOSE This programme will aim to create awareness amongst the general public regarding various environmental issues as well as ensure training for both the community as well as specialised training for internal personnel. 6.4.2 ROLEPLAYERS It is envisaged that a cluster of units and external roleplayers will be key to the implementation of this programme. Specific internal and external roleplayers are listed below: Key MLM Units External Roleplayers 6.4.3 ACTIVITIES AND PROJECTS This programme will focus on the following main activities: • Internal environmental management training; • Public training and education in critical environmental practices, and • Raising public awareness of environmental management. The relationship between these activities and formulated projects are indicated overleaf. The key responsible MLM unit as well as the priority of the individual projects are also indicated.

×