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    Zhang d lis 560 assignment 2 Zhang d lis 560 assignment 2 Document Transcript

    • LOCATION TECHNOLOGY WORKSHOP FOR PARENTS OF TEENS 1Location Technology Information Workshop for Parents of Teens Training Module Part 2: Lesson Plan Di Zhang LIS 560 A
    • LOCATION TECHNOLOGY WORKSHOP FOR PARENTS OF TEENS 2 Table of Contents1.0 Introduction……………………………………………………………………………………………32.0 Lesson Plan: Locating Technology Information Workshop…………………...........................3 2.1 Objective/Outcome .………….…………………………………………………………………3 2.2 Skill……………..…………………………………………………………………......................3 2.3 Target Audience…………………………………………………………………………………3 2.4 Materials Needed………………………………………………………………………………..4 2.5 Program…………………………………………………………………………………………..53.0 Evaluation/Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………….84.0 Further Training………………………………………………………………………………………85.0 Bibliography…………………………………………………………………………………………..96.0 Appendices………………………………………………………………………………………….11
    • LOCATION TECHNOLOGY WORKSHOP FOR PARENTS OF TEENS 31.0 Introduction Teens overwhelmingly embrace technology. According to a recent PEW study, 89% ofonline teens say the internet and other technology such as iPods, cell phones, and digitalcameras make their lives easier. Parents need to embrace this, and use technology to helpthem parent. Parents of teenagers are a unique group of information users in that they mustkeep up with the rapid growth and information consumption of their children. This not onlyincludes staying up-to-date on the use of technology and information of teens, but also beingable to use that same technology and information to perform their parental responsibilities. Thistraining module is designed to address one particular information need of parents of teens thatwas elucidated in part 1: the ability to track the whereabouts of teens and to increasesupervision. In order to address this need, it may be helpful for parents to be aware of thecurrent and emerging technologies that will help them to retrieve and store information. This willbe the focus of this workshop.2.0 Lesson Plan: Location Technology Information Workshop2.1 Objective/ Outcome Increase awareness of technologies to monitor teen activities and whereabouts Increase skills of finding suitable devices, programs, and technologies2.2 Skill Ability to locate information about devices, programs, and technologies (smart phone apps, software, and GPS devices) to monitor and locate individuals Ability to utilize information to address personal preferences and needs2.3 Target Audience The target audience is parents of teens from age 13-19. According to the CDC, themean age of mothers having their first baby has hovered around 25 over the past 3 decades.Parents of teens who are their first child may typically be between their mid-thirties and mid-forties. However, this does not take into account parents who have teenagers who may be theirsecond, third, fourth child or beyond, which is a more unpredictable range. Moreover, womenhave been more babies at every age. The audience for the workshop may be diverse in age,gender, race, and socioeconomic status. According to the US Census Bureau, there are about30 million teens in the United States. With only a third of households having a nuclear family, itis difficult to figure out exactly how many people would qualify as parents of teenagers, but it is
    • LOCATION TECHNOLOGY WORKSHOP FOR PARENTS OF TEENS 4certainly a sizeable portion of the population that well exceeds 30 million (1/10th of thepopulation). As mentioned in part 1, research into the information needs and behavior of parents hasbeen lacking. What is known is that parents of teens have a variety of information needs thatinvolvesupporting children emotionally, monitoring and verifying information, acting onpersonal ideals of parenting, setting expectations, boundaries, and consequences forteens’ behavior, implementing positive reinforcement in interactions with teens, andmaking sure that children are supervised and knowing their whereabouts. The last needis the subject of this workshop. According to the APA, lack of supervision of youth is among the greatest riskfactors for drug abuse, among other risks. Therefore, parents need to monitor thewhereabouts of their teenage children to make sure that they are in safe environmentsand within reach of a trusted adult who can help them. In this workshop, I will beteaching skills for finding information about technologies that can retrieve and storeinformation on the whereabouts of teens.2.4 Materials needed  GPS band that can be worn on the wrist  Handout on internet resources and strategies for information searching  A computer lab with a projector and screen, and computers that allow Internet access. Students will be enrolled on a first come first serve basis due limits on the number of computers available.  Evaluation forms.2.5. Program2.5.1 Introduction“Hello, and welcome to our workshop on using technology to ensure teens are better supervisedand reachable. As parents, I’m sure you’re aware that teens are being supervised less oftenthan previous generations. These days, teens have more places to go and more things to dothan ever before. At the same time, parents are often busier than ever with work and otherresponsibilities. As a result, making sure our teens are in a safe place is a more challengingthan it used to be.“As parents, you know that the teen years are when guidance is most necessary because of risksituations and behaviors that teens tend to get themselves into.“How many folks here have teens in Middle School? This is an age where it is still critical forthem to be supervised. Can you give me an example of a young teen that may have gotten intotrouble that may not have happened with appropriate supervision?” *Allow time for discussion and examples to be raised.
    • LOCATION TECHNOLOGY WORKSHOP FOR PARENTS OF TEENS 5“How many folks here have teens in High School? This is the age when teens start driving, andoften when kids start drinking as well. This can be a bad combination. Peer groups are highlyinfluential, and teens at this age experience many academic as well as social demands. Canyou think of any other challenges high school teens face that may call for increased supervision?Can you give me an example of a teen in high school that may have gotten in trouble becausethey could not be found or contacted by a trusted adult?” *Allow time for discussion and examples to be raised.“How many folks here have teens out of high school? What risk factors might be affecting thisgroup? *Allow time for discussion and examples to be raised.“I know that you probably already know the benefits of having the contact information for yourteen’s friends and their families, as well as any organizations or locations that your teenfrequently visits. Inthis workshop, we will go over some further ways to help ensure your teen issafe and reachable by learning more about technology. This will include learning skills to searchfor information on smart phone apps, software, and GPS devices that can help keep track ofteens. Also, you will learn how to select the technologies that fit your preferences, needs, andbudget.”Attention Activity:Perception: “You might think that I’m wearing a fashionable (or not so fashionable) bracelet. Butwhat I’m really wearing is a GPS tracking device intended to be used by parents to track minors.”I raise up my arm to reveal the shiny device.Inquiry: “I’d like you to imagine that your son or daughter has gone to a friend’s house to spendthe night. It is 11pm and they have not checked in with you, even though they were asked to doso once they reached the house. You call their cellphone but get no response. You have thehouse number of the friend whose house they are staying over at. You call the house number acouple of times, but there is no response. You stay up until 2am and there still is no response.This has happened before, so you decide to wait until morning. You call them again the nextmorning and there still is no response. You drive over to your son or daughter’s friend’s houseat 10am in the morning and they are indeed in the house. Fortunately, it turns out that the teenswere at home all night, but never bothered to check their phones.“Here is a question I would like you to consider: Would you ever consider monitoring your son ordaughter withthis GPS tracking bracelets?”Variability: “I’d like you to get into groups of four and to discuss what you would do in thescenario I just described and what your answer would be to the question I just asked. Pleaseremember to be respectful of each other’s opinions.”Hopefully, the participants reach theconclusion that it should be a family decision to use thesetechnologies, and that the teen ought to beshould in the decision making process. If necessary,I will explain why location technologies are not likely to work without the teen’s cooperation.2.5.2 Body of the Lesson
    • LOCATION TECHNOLOGY WORKSHOP FOR PARENTS OF TEENS 6Skill 1: Ability to locate information about devices, apps, and technologies (smart phone apps,software, and GPS devices) that can help monitor individualsSteps 1. Short lecture with handout (Appendix A) and PowerPoint slides 2. Online demonstration, while students follow along 3. Activity: students individually search for information on a device, program, or technologies that they are interestedMethod The steps just specified address different learning styles addressed by McCarthy. Iappeal to the analytical learner by addressing the question of “what.” The lecture will appeal totheir verbal abilities, and the PowerPoint presentation and the handout will appeal to their abilityto process and reflect on information. I appeal to the common sense learner by addressing thequestion of “how.” Allowing the students to follow along on their own computers allows them tolearn by thinking and doing. I appeal to the dynamic learning by asking the question of “what if.”The thirdstep allows dynamic learners the opportunity to pursue their own interests, to becreative, and to wonder what is possible with the technology. Lastly, I appeal to the imaginativestudent by addressing “why” questions that ask about their feelings. Furthermore, I encourageclass discussion, including asking and answering questions, and the sharing of experiences.The lecture and online demonstration embody more of a directed instruction approach tolearning, since they involve the communication of direct information and drilling/practice,respectively. Step three, the activity, embodies more of a constructivist approach to learningbecause it allows the student to learn through exploration and is likely led by considerations ofrelevance. According to Robyler, both directed instruction and constructivist approaches mustbe considered when it comes to classroom instruction.Tasks 1. Lecture with handout and PowerPoint Presentation I will introduce ways to search for information about devices, programs, and apps to locate individuals - Searching the Web through Google - Technology websites - How to learn about apps and tracking abilities through the websites of mobile phone providers 2. Demonstration I demonstrate how to use the Web to search for needed information - Searching for technology information and news through Google - Visiting helpful technology websites - A run-throughof the websites of popular mobile phone providers and what options for offered for locating/tracking individuals (parents will likely find that their own mobile phone provider offers such features)
    • LOCATION TECHNOLOGY WORKSHOP FOR PARENTS OF TEENS 7 - An overview of apps such as Google Latitude, and Facebook Check-in, as well as GPS devices. 3. Individual Activity Students learn more about a device, program, or app that interests them - Students may begin by searching on Google, browsing a tech website, or looking at company website. - Students will be asked to fill out a sheet about the features of the technology, its cost, how it can be used, and how they could feel about using it (Appendix C).Skill 2: Ability to utilize information to address personal preferences and needsSteps 1. Students share information 2. Class discussionMethod This part of the class is aimed at addressing the Confidence and Relevance componentsof learning according to Keller’s ARCS model. In order to build confidence, students must betold what is expected of them, they must have challenging and meaningful opportunities to learnand to fulfill those expectations, and they must get encouragement and acknowledgement whenthey meet those expectations. In this exercise, the instructor sets clear expectations as to whatkind of information students will look for. Furthermore, the exercise will be relevant to eachstudent, because they have the freedom to choose which piece of technology they would like tolearn more about. This helps to make the exercise both challenging and meaningful. Finally, thestudent builds confidence by meeting expectations as well as receiving acknowledgment of theirlearning as they share their findings with the class.Task 1. Students share information Each student shares what they learned about a device, program, or app that they researched - Students form groups of four with people near them - Students use their sheet as a guide for talking about the technology 2. Class discussion The class weighs the pros and cons of the various technologies - What information needs the technologies might fulfill - How they might reduce the teen risks
    • LOCATION TECHNOLOGY WORKSHOP FOR PARENTS OF TEENS 8 - Who might benefit from them3.0 Evaluation/Conclusion“Let’s go over what we did in our workshop today. First, I explained how to use the internet tosearch for information about location and tracking technologies. We then went online andpracticed searching Google, company websites, and tech websites. Third, you challengedourselves by putting your searching skills to the test; you had an individual activity in which eachof your sought more information about a piece of technology that interests you. Lastly, weshared information about these technologies, weighed their pros and cons, whom they mightbenefit, and how they would be beneficial.”“There are a few concepts that I want to run through once again. Can we reiterate some of therisks that teens of various ages face without proper supervision and accountability for theirwhereabouts? How can some of the technologies that we covered today reduce these risks? Ialso want to leave you with a few questions to ponder: As technologies rapidly develop andimprove, it is becoming easier to monitor and track anything, including people. Is there a pointthat parents should not cross in monitoring their children? For example, under whatcircumstances, and for what reasons, might a GPS device be appropriate to install in a car?Would it ever be appropriate to install a GPS band on a teen, as I demonstrated at thebeginning of this class?“I will leave you to ponder these personal questions by yourself. I hope that you now havegreater skills to stay up-to-date on technologies that can help you monitor and supervise yourteens in whatever way is most appropriate to your family. The library sincerely thanks you forcoming to the workshop. We hope that this has been an informative and satisfying experience.Before you leave, I ask that you take a minute to fill out a questionnaire to help us improve ourworkshops.”Satisfaction Throughout the workshop, I will seek ways to optimize the Satisfaction in the students’experience. I offer extrinsic rewards by making sure that each student has the attention thatthey need. I also provide positive reinforcement and feedback when they have shown aptitudein the skills covered. I treat each student equally in terms of the standards that I set and offeringhelp that is appropriate to each student’s ability. Intrinsic reinforcement is addressed by makingsure that all students’ questions are answered, and all their needs are met. Because theyvoluntarily come to the workshop, it is assumed that they are genuinely interested in learningthe skills covered. Therefore, they will get the intrinsic reinforcement they seek so long as theirinformation needs are met and they are shown respect, competence, and equality.4.0 Further Training Parents have a variety of information needs that depend largely on the multitude ofneeds their children have. One area that I am interested in addressing in a future workshop isthe monitoring of the information consumption of teens (media, social networks, internet, etc.). Ibelieve such a workshop would be helpful for parents who have to keep track of and evaluate
    • LOCATION TECHNOLOGY WORKSHOP FOR PARENTS OF TEENS 9the myriad of media outlets, websites, and other formal and informal resources that teensaccess on a daily basis.5.0 Bibliography22 Surprising facts about birth in the United States. (2009, August). Baby Center. Retrieved February 24,2011, from http://www.babycenter.com/0_22-surprising-facts-about-birth-in- the-united-states_1372273.bc?showAll=trueAmerican Women Are Waiting to Begin Families. (2002, December 11). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved February 24, 2011, from http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/02news/ameriwomen.htmCase, D.O. (2008). Looking for Information: A Survey of Research on Information Seeking, Needs, and Behavior (2nd ed.). UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.Developing Adolescents: A Reference for Professionals. American Psychological Association. (2008). Retrieved from APA Web site: http://apa.org/pi/families/resources/develop.pdfFatt, James Poon Teng. (1993). Learning Styles in Training: Teaching Learners the Way to Learn. Industrial and Commercial Training, 25(9), 17-23.Macgill, A. (2007). Parents, Teens and Technology. PEW Research Center Publications. Retrieved on February 25, 2011 from: http://pewresearch.org/pubs/621/McCarthy, Bernice. (1997). A tale of four learners: 4MAT’s learning styles. Educational Leadership, 54(6), 46-52.McDonough, H. (2007). “Dragging a Three-Year-Old to a Library”: The Information
    • LOCATION TECHNOLOGY WORKSHOP FOR PARENTS OF TEENS 10 Behavior of Parents of Young Chidren. Southern Connecticut State University. Retrieved on January 24, 2011, from: http://myriadeyes.com/MLSCapstonePortfolio/CoursesTaken/McDonough_ILS53 7_Group_Information_Behavior.htmPattee, A. (2006). The secret source: Sexually explicit young adult literature as an information source. Young Adult Library Services, 4, 30-38.Robyler, M.D. & J Edwards. (2000). “Learning Theories and Integration Models.” In Integration Educational Technology into Teaching. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall.A. Shanton and P. Dixon. Just what do they want? What do they need? A study of the information needs of children, Children and Libraries 1 (2003), pp. 36-42.Spinks, S. (2002). Frontline: Inside the Teenage Brain. Retrieved on January 24, 2011, from PBS Web site: http://pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/teenbrain/etc/script.htmlUS Census Bureau. (2009). Retrieved on February 24, 2011, from http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/STTable?_bm=y&-geo_id=01000US& qr_name=ACS_2009_5YR_G00_S0901&-ds_name=ACS_2009_5YR_G00_&- redoLog=false
    • LOCATION TECHNOLOGY WORKSHOP FOR PARENTS OF TEENS 11 Appendix A: Workshop Handout Helpful Websiteshttp://cnet.com/ - Reliable and fresh news on gadgetry and technology. Trustworthy reviews.http://geek.com/- Up and running since 1996. Exactly what the name suggests. News, reviews, andbuying guides.http://pcworld.com/- The online version of the magazine. As trustworthy and professional as they get.http://ilounge.com/- A great resource for anything Apple related. Technology Discussed Apps: Google Latitude http://www.google.com/mobile/latitude/ AT&T FamilyMap http://familymap.wireless.att.com/finder-att-family/howWorks.htm Facebook Check-In http://www.facebook.com/blog.php?post=418175202130 GPS *Personal bracelet *Vehicle Severity scaleReal Time with history tracking Passive Tracking Car Chip
    • LOCATION TECHNOLOGY WORKSHOP FOR PARENTS OF TEENS 12 Appendix B Workshop EvaluationWhat aspects of today’s workshop were MOST informative, helpful, or satisfying? Please explain briefly.What aspects of today’s workshop were LEAST informative, helpful, or satisfying? Please explain briefly.Do you feel that you gained any meaningful skills in this workshop? Please explain briefly.How could this workshop be improved next time? Please be as specific as you can.Are there topics that were left out that you would have liked to learn or discuss?Are there any technologies that you think should have been addressed, but were not?
    • LOCATION TECHNOLOGY WORKSHOP FOR PARENTS OF TEENS 13 Appendix C Activity Sheet- Researching a TechnologyInstructions: Research a piece of location technology using the Internet search strategies andresources that you learned in part 1. You may either delve deeper into a technology or productthat was mentioned in the lecture or you may begin a new search altogether. Feel free todiscuss your search process with those around you or ask one of the library staff if youapproach a barrier.Answer the following questions during the beginning of your search: 1. What search strategy or strategies are you using? What resources are you using? 2. Are you having any trouble finding relevant information? Are you having any trouble narrowing down your search?Once you have decided on subject, answer the following questions: 3. What company makes it? Does this company offer different versions? 4. What is the cost? 5. Make a list of its main features. Why would these features be appealing? 6. What is its purpose? Under what circumstances would is it useful? 7. Who is it designed for? Who might find it most useful? 8. Can you think of any uses for it other than its advertised uses? 9. How would you feel about using this product or technology? Explain your reasoning. 10. Try an alternate strategy or resource and see if you can find the same information about this product or technology. Which route worked better? Why?