NMP 641
Bay Path College
Capital Campaign and Major Gifts Fundraising for
Nonprofit Organizations
Dianna M. Parks
November...
What is a campaign?
“Campaigns usually grow from some pressing need
that is limiting the organization’s growth.”
(Kihlsted...
Mental preparation
•

“The key to a powerful case for support is to write it not from the
perspective of what your organiz...
Readiness assessment
Essential Elements of Campaign Readiness
• involved governing board
• mission, vision, and values
• o...
Before the campaign - prospecting
The Prospect Pipeline

Discover

Qualify

Initial
Research

Nurture

Track

Ask

Steward...
Campaign Preparation
• Set a campaign goal – 10X annual fund, 2 prospects per
top 10 gifts, one donor to give 15% of goal,...
Campaign Leadership
Selecting a campaign chair is an important
decision. This person needs to give an
early and impactful ...
Campaign Consultants
A consultant will…
• be a good teacher
• offer firm advice based
on experience
• keep board focused

...
Campaign Plan
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Campaign objectives
Campaign goals
Case for support
Gift range chart
Donor r...
Pro$pect$
Rank prospects and apply effort
to those with most potential

Can
give

Prospects

Can be
met

Can be
interested...
Cycle of Understanding
1. Awareness: potential donors must
know of and understand the cause
and the desired outcome.
2. Un...
Asking
Education + Involvement + Cultivation +
Inclination + Assets
= THE RIGHT TIME TO ASK
(Fredricks, 2010, p. 70)

“The...
Can You Hear Me Now?
Quiet Phase

Public Phase

• Solicit lead gifts
• Solicit board members
• Solicitations are in-person...
Stewardship
•

Every donor should be acknowledged at least three times.
(Kihlstedt, 2010, p. 349)

•

The effectiveness of...
Celebrate!
“In a world in which many people measure success by money, people
will see your organization in a new light onc...
References
References
Fredricks, L. (2010). The Ask. San Franciso, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Hart, T, Greenfield, J.M, Gignac, P.M....
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Nmp 650 e portfolio 2 assignment - Parks

  1. 1. NMP 641 Bay Path College Capital Campaign and Major Gifts Fundraising for Nonprofit Organizations Dianna M. Parks November 2013
  2. 2. What is a campaign? “Campaigns usually grow from some pressing need that is limiting the organization’s growth.” (Kihlstedt, 2010, p. 12) Campaign types • • • • • Brick-and-mortar – usually straightforward to fund capital improvements Special project campaigns – less intensive than a larger campaign Endowment campaigns – best for a well-established organization to build a lasting fund; good for deferred gifts Combined campaign – a combination of brick-and-mortar & endowment; often will provide for an endowment to maintain the capital project Comprehensive campaign – usually a five to ten year duration for all funding needs of the organization, with a large goal Source: Kihlstedt, 2010, pp. 4-5
  3. 3. Mental preparation • “The key to a powerful case for support is to write it not from the perspective of what your organization needs, but to push beyond that and articulate what difference an investment will make in the world. (Kihlstedt, 2010, p. 13) • “Essential to the ask is knowing as much as you can about the person before making the Ask.” (Fredricks, 2010, p. 9) • “When you are asking for money, you are not asking someone to give something up, you are giving them the opportunity to invest in your organization and to feel good.” (Fredricks, 2010, p. 17) • A prospect is “someone you think might support your work. Not just because they might have money but because their interests match those of your organization.” (Hart, Greenfield, Gignac & Carnie, 2006, p. 10)
  4. 4. Readiness assessment Essential Elements of Campaign Readiness • involved governing board • mission, vision, and values • organizational planning • an agreed upon statement of campaign objectives • constituency • history of giving • prospect development plan • information system/database • communications • executive team • potential lead-gift and major-gift prospects • fundraising leadership • niche awareness Source: Kihlstedt, 2010, pp. 24-28 If the organization is shaky in more than one key area, not only will the ride get hair-raising at times, but you’ll need to temper your goals to fit your growing pains. (Kihlstedt, 2010, p. 23)
  5. 5. Before the campaign - prospecting The Prospect Pipeline Discover Qualify Initial Research Nurture Track Ask Steward Data mining: discovering records that show particular patterns within a database Prospect screening: comparing data from database to other data Prospect review: reviewing lists of prospects with colleagues and volunteers Source: Hart et al., 2006, pp. 24-29
  6. 6. Campaign Preparation • Set a campaign goal – 10X annual fund, 2 prospects per top 10 gifts, one donor to give 15% of goal, consistent with peers? • Create a case statement – why is the project needed, why now, how will the project work, and what will it cost? Must be brief and easily recalled. • Develop a gift range chart – campaign will depend on top 10 donors; three prospects per gift (on average) • Conduct a feasibility study – uncover bad impressions in community (if any), test case with loyal supporters, use outside fundraising consultant for in-person interviews Source: Kihlstedt, 2010, Chapter 3
  7. 7. Campaign Leadership Selecting a campaign chair is an important decision. This person needs to give an early and impactful campaign gift, and be willing to have his or her commitment be public in order to inspire and attract other donors. Finally, this person will need to devote time to help solicit other gifts and volunteers. Source: Kihlstedt, 2010, Chapter 4
  8. 8. Campaign Consultants A consultant will… • be a good teacher • offer firm advice based on experience • keep board focused A consultant will not… • serve as campaign manager • raise the money • convert all board members into fundraisers Source: Kihlstedt, 2010, Chapter 4
  9. 9. Campaign Plan 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Campaign objectives Campaign goals Case for support Gift range chart Donor recognition Campaign structure Campaign policies and practices Campaign timeline Campaign budget Communications plan Source: Kihlstedt, 2010, p. 146
  10. 10. Pro$pect$ Rank prospects and apply effort to those with most potential Can give Prospects Can be met Can be interested Cold – Known capacity, but unknown interest. Cool – Known capacity, give to similar organizations. Lukewarm – Known capacity, known to us. Warm – We think they will give with proper cultivation. Hot – We know them personally, they are interested, able to make a large gift. Red Hot – Behavior indicates a major gift is likely. Hart et al., 2006, p. 144
  11. 11. Cycle of Understanding 1. Awareness: potential donors must know of and understand the cause and the desired outcome. 2. Understanding: potential donors see the work you do and begin to appreciate the issues, problems and challenges. Action Awareness Commitment Understanding 3. Commitment: when prospects decide to support your cause; emotional buy-in has begun and prospect is ready to be cultivated as a donor. 4. Action: comes only when they are clearly ready and in a position to give. Hart et al., 2006, p. 151
  12. 12. Asking Education + Involvement + Cultivation + Inclination + Assets = THE RIGHT TIME TO ASK (Fredricks, 2010, p. 70) “The anticipated responses you may receive should not prevent you from asking if you feel the time is right, provided the Ask is done with sensitivity and understanding.” (Fredricks, 2010, p. 186)
  13. 13. Can You Hear Me Now? Quiet Phase Public Phase • Solicit lead gifts • Solicit board members • Solicitations are in-person and personal • Volunteers are influential insiders • Employ special events to announce • Use media to help spread messaging • Use variety of methods per prospect type: inperson, phone, mail, online • Broad base of volunteers Source: Kihlstedt, 2010.
  14. 14. Stewardship • Every donor should be acknowledged at least three times. (Kihlstedt, 2010, p. 349) • The effectiveness of a gesture is based more on the authenticity of the feelings that are motivating it than on the lavishness of the gesture itself. (Kihlstedt, 2010, p. 342) • Every giver wants to hear that the money they entrusted with your organization and its leadership is having an immediate positive effect and that but for this investment and the investment of others, none of this would have happened. (Fredricks, 2010, p. 223) • A “yes” now will lead to a “yes” later if you execute a solid stewardship plan for each person. (Fredricks, 2010, p. 227) • A disciplined approach to gratitude and recognition is a true investment in your organization’s future. (Kihlstedt, 2010, p. 339)
  15. 15. Celebrate! “In a world in which many people measure success by money, people will see your organization in a new light once you have successfully completed a capital campaign.” (Kihlstedt, 2010, p. 337) “Your campaign will show you that if you have a clear vision and a compelling case, the money is just a campaign away.” (Kihlstedt, 2010, p. 374) “Campaign celebrations both conclude the campaign and also begin a new phase in donors’ relationships with the organization… The celebration should thank them for their help and paint a picture of a future exciting enough to get them thinking about wanting to stay on board.” (Kihlstedt, 2010, p. 367) Cultivate the habit of being grateful for every good thing that comes to you, and to give thanks continuously. And because all things have contributed to your advancement, you should include all things in your gratitude. – Ralph Waldo Emerson
  16. 16. References References Fredricks, L. (2010). The Ask. San Franciso, CA: Jossey-Bass. Hart, T, Greenfield, J.M, Gignac, P.M., & Carnie, C. (2006). Major Donors: Finding big gifts in your database and online. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons. Kihlstedt, A. (2010). Capital Campaigns: strategies that work. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers. Turnitin Statement I submit that this paper is entirely my own work and agree that it may be submitted to Turnitin for the purpose of checking for plagiarism and further that it may be maintained on the Turnitin database in order to check for future plagiarism.

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