Ursula Mc Gowan 2008

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Session B - H6-10

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Ursula Mc Gowan 2008

  1. 2. <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Diversity </li></ul><ul><li>Apprenticeship Model </li></ul><ul><li>Inclusive Assessment Practice </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Constructive alignment </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Promoting Evidence-based Writing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>RSD – Research Skill Development Framework </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Students Engagement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rubrics for Feed-back + Feed-forward </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Conclusion </li></ul>Overview
  2. 3. Introduction <ul><li>Personal Context: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1991-2002 Academic student support (Language and Learning) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2002-2008 Academic staff developer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Previous experience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Faculty-based lecturer (German Department) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lecturer in ESL / EAL (English as Additional Language) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Personal experience of being an ESL learner </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Formal qualification in multicultural education </li></ul></ul></ul>
  3. 4. Introduction <ul><li>“ Assessment is a core academic activity and an essential component of the learning process. Its main purposes are to encourage student learning, to make judgements about student achievements and to monitor the effectiveness of the learning environment.” </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The University of Adelaide Assessment for Coursework Programs Policy Effective 1 January 2009 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  4. 5. Diversity <ul><li>Diverse student backgrounds </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Local student diversity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Socio-economic, multicultural, personal </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>International student diversity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Countries of origin, levels of entry language, cultural expectations, personal </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Academic writing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Inclusive assessment practice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Core curriculum approach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Not ‘remedial’ approach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Apprenticeship model </li></ul></ul>
  5. 6. Apprenticeship Model <ul><li>http://www.adelaide.edu.au/clpd/plagiarism/staff/downloads/06_UM_plagiarism_framework.pdf </li></ul>
  6. 7. Inclusive Assessment Practice <ul><li>Assessment for learning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>feedback + feed-forward </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Constructive alignment - Biggs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Alignment of </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Learning objective </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Teaching activity </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Assessment </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Learning objective (focus of this paper) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>evidence based writing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>writing as a researcher </li></ul></ul>
  7. 8. Promoting evidence-based writing <ul><li>RSD – Research Skill Development Framework </li></ul><ul><li>http:// www.adelaide.edu.au/clpd/rsd / </li></ul><ul><li>An example of successful implementation of an undergraduate research writing skills program is that development . </li></ul><ul><li>This involves a gradual scaffolding of the skills of integrating information from a limited number of resources with detailed feedback provided during the process. </li></ul>
  8. 9. Promoting evidence-based writing <ul><li>To facilitate learning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Explanation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>How is research writing different from other writing </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What is purpose of referencing? – yet not used elsewhere </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Practice (safe environment) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Trial and error </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Errors as points of learning (not as ‘offence’) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Rubric as cover sheet = instant feedback </li></ul></ul></ul>
  9. 10. Assessment Rubric – cover sheet Little or no referencing Mixed referencing systems Prescribed referencing Appropriate referencing Quotes without quotation marks Quotes ‘speak for themselves’ Viewpoint related to readings Quotations used as evidence No critique applied Internet sources used uncritically Internet sources used but critiqued Critiques internet sources used No use of refereed articles Minimal use of refereed articles 3+ refereed articles cited Cites journal articles Topic not addressed Topic partly addressed Topic fully addressed Addresses topic Needs work Satisfactory Excellent Criteria
  10. 11. Student Engagement <ul><li>Feed-back </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rubric used as cover sheet </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ticked boxes = instant overview of strengths and weaknesses </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Feed-forward </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rubric provided as a guideline before assignments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sets out criteria and levels of achievement </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Improving effectiveness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Being explicit about expectations </li></ul></ul>
  11. 12. Student Engagement <ul><li>Feedback (including feed forward) works well when it: </li></ul><ul><li>Motivates students – helps them to want to learn; </li></ul><ul><li>Helps students to identify what they need to do next; </li></ul><ul><li>Helps students to take action to improve their learning; </li></ul><ul><li>Helps students to make sense of what they are learning; </li></ul><ul><li>Helps them to make realistic evaluations of their own abilities and achievements; </li></ul><ul><li>Helps them to reflect on their past work in ways they can use to improve their future work. </li></ul><ul><li>From Phil Race (2008) Slide 18 </li></ul>
  12. 13. Conclusion <ul><li>The approach provides a means of integrating the development of academic writing skills into the core curriculum, in order to accommodate both international and local students from diverse backgrounds. </li></ul><ul><li>It supports an apprenticeship model of learning for inducting students into the purposes and values of research skills and evidence-based writing in the tertiary research environment </li></ul>
  13. 14. References <ul><li>McGowan, U (2006) Plagiarism Framework: Student as apprentice researcher. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.adelaide.edu.au/clpd/plagiarism/staff/downloads/06_UM_plagiarism_framework.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>McGowan, U. (2005) Does educational integrity mean teaching students NOT to ‘use their own words’? International Journal for Educational Integrity1(1) Retrieved 20/9/08 from </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.ojs.unisa.edu.au/index.php/IJEI/issue/view/3 </li></ul><ul><li>Race, Phil (2008) Smarter Feedback, Newcastle College, ppt presentation 26/9/08 http://phil-race.co.uk/ Specific Downloads: http://phil-race.co.uk/?page_id=82 Slides #18 and #19. </li></ul><ul><li>Willison, J. & O’Regan, K. (2007). Commonly known, commonly not known, totally unknown: a framework for students becoming researchers. Higher Education Research and Development 26 (4), 393-409. </li></ul>
  14. 15. Abstract <ul><li>The purpose of this paper is to explore the possibilities of an inclusive assessment practice that assists students from diverse backgrounds in effective engagement with feedback provided on their written assignments. The particular focus is on their development of evidence-based writing in the tertiary research environment. The strategies examined include the development of the skills of gathering information; critically evaluating their sources; analysing, categorising and synthesising their data; and communicating their findings in an academically acceptable manner. Student engagement is provoked through a system of feed-forward and feed-back by the use of assessment rubrics that identify and reward specific aspects of evidence-based writing. Criteria provided in the rubric serve firstly to feed-forward , i.e. provide explicit information to guide individual aspects of student academic writing – including the number and quality of sources to be cited and the manner in which these sources should be critiqued. …cont </li></ul>
  15. 16. Abstract (cont) <ul><li>Secondly such rubrics can serve as assessment cover sheets to be used for instant feed-back in terms of a student’s level of attainment against each of the criteria. </li></ul><ul><li>The approach provides a means of integrating the development of academic writing skills into the core curriculum, in order to accommodate both international and local students from diverse backgrounds. It supports an apprenticeship model of learning for inducting students into the purposes and values of research skills and evidence-based writing in the tertiary research environment. The process is based on the author’s work in supporting the tertiary writing skills of local and international students, and is proposed as a holistic, curriculum-based alternative to remedial support for students from culturally and academically diverse backgrounds . </li></ul><ul><li>*** </li></ul>

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