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Ieva Stupans 2008

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Session B - H6-03

Session B - H6-03

Published in: Education, Health & Medicine

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  • 1. Wanted! Evidence based guidelines for unseen invigilated examinations Ieva Stupans University of South Australia
  • 2. Three interrelated objectives for quality in student assessment in higher education
    • 1. Assessment that guides and encourages effective approaches to learning
    • 2. Assessment that validly and reliably measures expected learning outcomes, in particular the higher-order learning that characterises higher education; and
    • 3. Assessment and grading that defines and protects academic standards
    • EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS
    • (McInnis, 2004)
  • 3. Wanted! Evidence based guidelines for unseen invigilated examinations
    • EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS
    • RESOURCE EFFICIENCY
  • 4. Wanted! Evidence based guidelines for unseen invigilated examinations
    • Analysis of marks on 1,712 modules at Oxford Polytechnic. Modules with 100% coursework had an average mark 3.5% higher than modules with 100% examinations, and there were three times as many failed students on modules where there were only examinations. (Gibbs & Lucas, 1997)
    • F our universities - coursework marks higher by one third of a degree classification in English and History and higher by two thirds of a degree classification in Biology, Business Studies, Computer Studies and Law. (Bridges et al. 2002)
  • 5. Wanted! Evidence based guidelines for unseen invigilated examinations
    • Audit from an Australian university indicated that approximately 50% of first year subjects had final examinations within their assessment profile, within sciences this was approximately 80%. (Taylor, 2006)
    • With respect to certification or accreditation of learning by an external body such as a health profession accreditation body, for example, FIP recommends ‘ a final examination should lead to the granting of a diploma or degree’ . (FIP, 2000)
  • 6. Wanted! Evidence based guidelines for unseen invigilated examinations
    • Assessment
    • for learning = coursework type assessments
    • of learning = invigilated examinations
    • Assessment
    • ‘ traditional’= learning at the lowest levels of Bloom’s cognitive domain
    • ‘ alternative’ = positioned to measure learners’ higher-level thinking skills of synthesis, analysis, and evaluation
  • 7. Wanted! Evidence based guidelines for unseen invigilated examinations
    • Assessment of learning is not mutually exclusive to “alternative” assessment
    • but
    • is frequently associated with question spotting, cramming and short-term knowledge retention
    • therefore
    • the concept of structuring questions which allow students to demonstrate higher-level thinking skills is one which needs to be developed.
  • 8. Returning to the unseen invigilated exam !
    • “ Blueprinting”
    • Assessment and grading that defines and protects academic standards
    • problem solving MCQ
    • Assessment that validly and reliably measures expected learning outcomes, in particular higher-order learning
    • “ cheat sheets” and open book
    • Assessment that guides and encourages effective approaches to learning
    • Higher order learning
  • 9. “ Blueprinting” e.g. stats Level of skill required Standards Definitions Compre- hension Application Analysis Problem solving Total Analyse data using mean, median etc 2 MCQ 2 MCQ 8 MCQ 1 written response 12 MCQ+ written Predict from data 6 MCQ 2 MCQ 1 written response 8 MCQ+ written
  • 10. “ Blueprinting”
    • Tension between efficiency and effectiveness (reliability)
    • What is the optimal number of items, balance of items- MCQ, short answer and extended answer?
    • Should components be weighted?
    • Assessment of different learning outcomes but these are interrelated.
  • 11. Problem solving MCQ
    • MCQ in Pharmacology
    • Questions which require application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation can be written
    • Writing of such questions needs to be intentional ( importance of “blueprinting”)
    • For NESB students to achieve similar results, attention needs to be paid as to whether questions are assessing application of pharmacology knowledge or application of pharmacology knowledge and language proficiency.
  • 12. Cheat sheets and open book
    • Students have access to “essential reference books” in examination
    • Does this impact on “quality” of answers particularly for weak students.
    • Is there a way to optimise student learning using open book and “cheat sheets”
  • 13. Cheat sheets and open book
    • Questions
    • Strategies such that there is motivation for students to organize all of the materials in their minds prior to the exam
    • Strategies so that exam time is not the time for students to work through the texts for the first time
  • 14. Wanted! Evidence based guidelines for unseen invigilated examinations Educational Effectiveness Resource efficiency Hornby, 2003 Unseen Examination Learning logs/diaries Peer assessment Annotated bibliographies Projects/case studies