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Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
Being Active
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Being Active

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BEING ACTIVE Why and How should I be active? …

BEING ACTIVE Why and How should I be active?
Diabetes educators and their patients collaborate to address barriers, such as physical, environmental, psychological and time limitations. They also work together to develop an appropriate activity plan that balances food and medication with the activity level.

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  • 1. BEING ACTIVE Washington Association of Diabetes Educatorswww.DiabetesAnswers.org or www.WADEpage.org
  • 2. HOW CAN EXERCISE HELP?Regular physical activity can help you … •Lose weight •Gain energy •Lower blood sugar •Improve over all •Lower risk of heart health •Improve sense of disease well being
  • 3. Getting started •Talk to your doctor and get a check up •Develop a plan with your diabetes care team •Start gradually
  • 4. Physical Activity: Keep it fun•Chose enjoyable activities•Enjoy activity with a partner•Add variety
  • 5. TYPES of ExercisesEndurance – walk, jog, swim, bike, Cross country skiStrength – Weight / Resistance trainingFlexibility – stretching exercises,YogaBalance – specific balance exercises and / or Tia Chi
  • 6. TIPS FOR SAFETY •Test your blood sugar before and after •Always warm up and cool down •Wear the right shoes and socks •Drink plenty of water
  • 7. Physical activity can lead to low blood sugar (Hypoglycemia) Carry a carbohydrate snack Wear a id bracelet or at the very least carry an id card
  • 8. BASIC MOVES The next slides will walk you through “Basic Moves” a well balanced set of exercises carefully selected for safety, simplicity of movement, and adjusted for many medical/ physical limitations. Order the DVD at www.onwardproductions.netYou will need a chair, elastic bands, and 30 minutes of your time
  • 9. If a pulmonary condition is present, coordinateexercise movements with pursed lips breathing Instructions for “pursed lips breathing”: Take an easy breath in through nose; exhale slowly and gently through pursed lips, breathing out as long as comfortably possible. Use with all physical exertion
  • 10. Warm-up ExercisesBegin warm-up with 2-3 minutes of easy walking around a room orstanding in one place, using arms in a natural strideIf you have balance issues, have an anchor nearby to offer support,such as a sturdy chairKeep your walk and all warm-up movements very light, rhythmic, andpain free.Warm-up a total of 5-10 minutes Maintain rhythmic breathing.On the next few slides are examples of warm upexercises. for all eight warm exercises go tohttp://wadepage.org/node/599
  • 11. Warm-up ExercisesCross-Country SkiPlace feet shoulder widthapart. Bend both kneesmoderately whilealternating arms slowly andrhythmically in a cross-country ski motion. Repeat5-10 times on each side. ©4/08, updated 2/11. Al rights reserved. Developed and photographed by Sherrie K. Evenson, MS, ACSM-RCEP/CET, Exercise Physiologist
  • 12. Warm-up ExercisesWide Side-to-Side KneeBendPlace feet wider than shoulder widthapart, pointing out at a ~45 degreeangle. Bend one knee slightly andthen the other, moving side to sidein a rhythmic, pain-free motion.Repeat 5-10 times on each leg. ©4/08, updated 2/11. Al rights reserved. Developed and photographed by Sherrie K. Evenson, MS, ACSM-RCEP/CET, Exercise Physiologist
  • 13. Warm-up ExercisesLeg Tuck & ExtendRest both hands lightly on theback of a sturdy chair, wall orcounter for support. Bend at thehips without rounding thespine. Pull knee of one legtoward chest, then straightenleg behind you avoiding overarching the back when youextend. Repeat 5-10 times oneach leg. ©4/08, updated 2/11. Al rights reserved. Developed and photographed by Sherrie K. Evenson, MS, ACSM-RCEP/CET, Exercise Physiologist
  • 14. Resistance Training ExercisesGENERAL GUIDELINES PLEASE READWarm up before and cool down after this session. Maintainnormal breathing - avoid holding breath. Maintain the naturalcurves of the spine throughout. Use full, deliberate, controlledrange of motion (1-2 seconds in both directions). Perform 10-15repetitions of each exercise and 1-3 sets. One set is enough forinitial basic fitness. Resistance train 2-3x/wk on nonconsecutivedays. On the next few slides are several examples of Resistance Training Exercises to see other examples please go to: http://wadepage.org/node/599
  • 15. Resistance Training ExercisesStand-ups (10-15 repetitions)for leg strengthSit toward middle of chair with feet underknees and shoulder width apart. Witharms straight out to side, stand to fullextension. Move arms straight forward,and “squat back” to sitting position. Ifknee pain, thigh weakness, or instabilityis experienced, try sitting on somethingthat elevates you a 2-4 inches, such as aphone book. ©4/08, updated 2/11. Al rights reserved. Developed and photographed by Sherrie K. Evenson, MS, ACSM-RCEP/CET, Exercise Physiologist
  • 16. Resistance Training ExercisesSeated Row (10-15repetitions) for upperbackSit toward front of chair with oneleg extended. Position bandacross ball of extended foot.Grasp end of band in each hand12-18 inches from foot on eachside. Pull elbows straight back infull flexion (hands will end up atwaistline). Return to startposition. Must be performed ©4/08, updated 2/11. Al rights reserved. Developed andwith a band. photographed by Sherrie K. Evenson, MS, ACSM-RCEP/CET, Exercise Physiologist
  • 17. Resistance Training ExercisesBent-over Row: alternativeto Seated RowMay perform with hand weight: Bendtorso forward from the hipswith legs in wide stride. Supportweight on chair back or front knee.Hold weight in free hand with armstraight toward floor. Pull elbowtoward ceiling. ©4/08, updated 2/11. Al rights reserved. Developed and photographed by Sherrie K. Evenson, MS, ACSM-RCEP/CET, Exercise Physiologist
  • 18. Cool-Down ExercisesStart your cool-downs with 2-3 minutes easy walking, either in one place oraround the roomHold each stretch 15-30 seconds Stretch only to the point of “mild discomfort”.Stretches should never be painful Maintain excellent posture, always keepingchest lifted and head looking straight forward Muscles should be warm beforestretching; be sure to precede with warm-ups and/or other activity Maintainrhythmic breathing. On the next few slides are several examples of Cool- down exercises to see other examples please go to: http://wadepage.org/node/599 ©4/08, updated 2/11. Al rights reserved. Developed and photographed by Sherrie K. Evenson, MS, ACSM-RCEP/CET, Exercise Physiologist
  • 19. Cool-Down ExercisesSide stretchGently extend one armup, pushing the palmtoward the ceiling.Slowly lift rib cage andshoulder blade to feel apain-free stretch throughthe torso. Hold 15-30seconds. ©4/08, updated 2/11. Al rights reserved. Developed and photographed by Sherrie K. Evenson, MS, ACSM-RCEP/CET, Exercise Physiologist
  • 20. Cool-Down ExercisesChest stretchClasp hands behind yourback. Gently push bothshoulders back, squeezing theshoulder blades together for apain-free stretch across chestand front of shoulders. Hold15-30 seconds. ©4/08, updated 2/11. Al rights reserved. Developed and photographed by Sherrie K. Evenson, MS, ACSM-RCEP/CET, Exercise Physiologist
  • 21. Cool-Down ExercisesCalf stretchRest hands on back of chairwith one foot behind you in alunge position. Point toes ofboth feet straight forward. Pushgently on heel of back foot,letting hips fall lightly forwardfor a pain-free stretch throughcalf muscle. Keep back footflat. Hold 15-30 seconds. ©4/08, updated 2/11. Al rights reserved. Developed and photographed by Sherrie K. Evenson, MS, ACSM-RCEP/CET, Exercise Physiologist
  • 22. Whats the Best Exercise For Type 2Diabetics?
  • 23. SparkPeople Resistance BandWorkout
  • 24. Yoga Exercises to Burn Fat andLose Weight
  • 25. How to Lose Weight withExercises
  • 26. Tai Chi for Beginners
  • 27. FIND OUT MOREwww.Diabetes Answers.org or www.WADEpage.orgWashington Association of Diabetes Educators

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