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  • - chose this topic because I love dogs \n- wanted to look into something that would deal with dogs giving back to the community without them really knowing how much they are helping someone \n
  • - people who are legally blind have a central visual acuity in their better eye that when corrected does not exceed 20/200\n- or a visual field with a maximum angular diameter of no more than 20 degrees \n
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  • - what someone who has a cataract’s eye would look like\n- best description is a cloudy looking lens \n- this is the number one cause world wide of blindness \n- throughout life our bodies replace old cells with new ones \n- as we get older the old cells in our eyes build up and block all of the light that is trying to pass through and that is how the cloudy vision occurs\n\n
  • age-related: 95% of cataracts are age-related after the age of 40 \ncongenital: these defects occur at birth by either an infection or inflammation during pregnancy\ntraumatic: lens damage from an eye injury such as a very hard blow, a cut, a puncture, intense heat, or a chemical burn \nsecondary: some medicines, eye disease, eye infection, or diseases such as diabetes can cause cataracts\n\n
  • - picture of what a person with cataracts sees \n
  • RISK FACTORS\n- uv light exposure\n- long term steroid use\n- heredity from family members who have had cataracts\n- eye injury or diseases \n- smoking\n\n
  • - more then half of the people over the age of 80 have had a cataract or have had surgery \n\n
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  • - the eye is always making a fluid called aqueous humor\n- this fluid helps maintain a normal eye pressure and provides the lens and the cornea with the nutrients that is needed\n- this fluid circulates in the front of the eye \n- it gets drained through the trabecular meshwork \n- there is usually a balance between how much of the Aqueous Humor is made and how much of it leaves the eye\n- when there is not a balance between the two then intraocular pressure builds up inside the eye\n- this leads to damages to the optic nerve and glaucoma can develop\n
  • - experts have predicted that about half of the 3 million people who are affected by glaucoma do not know that they have it\n
  • - it has no symptoms \n- vision loss from glaucoma cannot be regained\n- untreated glaucoma will lead to blindness \n
  • - Glaucoma is a group of diseases that are distinguished by the increase of pressure in the eye which leads to the nerve damages\n- there is many different types of diseases that fall into the category of glaucoma that can cause blindness \n
  • - open angle has no symptoms at first \n- high eye pressure is the most recognized risk factor for the development and progression of the disease\n- the pressure will continue to build up until the optic nerve is damaged\n- the first sign of this disease will be loss of peripheral vision\n- if left untreated this will lead to complete blindness \n
  • - there is two types of closed angle glaucoma\n- acute and chronic\n\n
  • - acute closed angle glaucoma is a medical emergency that needs to be treated immediately or else blindness can occur in one or two days \n- the iris and lens are suddenly blocked from receiving the aqueous humor fluid \n- symptoms of acute is severe pain, nausea, vommiting, and blurred vision\n- patient could possibly see halos around lights\n\n
  • - chronic closed angle glaucoma progresses slowly and will produce damage without symptoms (similar to open angle) \n
  • - it is believed that it is the result of a very fragile or weak optic nerve\n- also believed to develop from low blood flow to the optic nerve\n\n
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  • AMD is a common eye condition in people above the age of 50. \n- leading cause of vision loss is older adults\n- some people: advances so slowly that vision loss does not occur for a very long time \n\n
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  • Transcript

    • 1. BLINDNESS By: Devyn Ingramhttp://www.art-dept.com/artists/rankin/portfolio/specialprojects/eyescapes/ portfolio.html
    • 2. Thesis • Globally 45 million people are blind due to three main causes and have had to deal with not only loss of vision but loss of independence as well. Guide dogs have been traced back to the 16th century and have helped blind persons regain their independence.http://www.art-dept.com/artists/rankin/portfolio/specialprojects/eyescapes/portfolio.html
    • 3. Personal Relevance
    • 4. What is blindness?http://www.granitegrok.com/pix/blind-man.jpg
    • 5. Leading Causes• Cataracts• Glaucoma• Macular Degeneration • Age-Related Macular Degeneration
    • 6. Cataracts #1 cause of blindness worldwide"Cataract - A Leading Cause of Blindness." Editorial. J Nepal Medical Association 46.3 (July 2007): n. pag. Web. 2 Mar. 2011."Guide to Cataract Surgery ." Prevent Blindness America. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Mar. 2011. <http://www.preventblindness.org>.http://www.crystalensdoctor.com/images/cataract_eye.gif
    • 7. Types of Cataracts • Age Related • Congenital • Traumatic • Secondary"Guide to Cataract Surgery ." Prevent Blindness America. N.p., n.d.Web. 2 Mar. 2011. <http://www.preventblindness.org>.http://www.stlukeseye.com/images/img-cataract-photo.jpg
    • 8. Cataractshttp://www.katzmaneyes.com/images/AAO-A06.jpg
    • 9. Risk Factors http://topics.info.com/image/400x200/3436_cataract_risk_factors_and_prevention.jpg http://www.goc.state.md.us/images/HappyFamily.jpg http://www.anabolicsteroidsforsale.org/wp-content/uploads/anabolicsteroidsforsale.jpghttp://www.clker.com/cliparts/a/3/c/e/1206566111376377206tribut_No-Smoking_Sign.svg.med.png http://www.austincountyeye.com/graphics/protecting-your-eyes.jpg
    • 10. Who is most at risk?http://www.fasttrackhappiness.com/images/beautiful_older_couple_2.jpg
    • 11. Cataract Surgery • Small incision is made in the eye • The cataract (cloudy lens) is removed from the eye through the small incision • An IOL (Intraocular Lens) is inserted in replace to the old lens"Guide to Cataract Surgery ." Prevent Blindness America. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Mar. 2011. <http://www.preventblindness.org>.http://www.hudsoneyemd.com/images/cataract%20surgery.jpg
    • 12. Glaucoma • Glaucoma is the result of the build up of aqueous humor fluid in the eye"Living with Glaucoma." National Glaucoma Research. AmericanHealth Assistance Foundation, n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2011. <http:/www.ahaf.org/docs/ pdf-publications/livingwithglaucoma.pdf>
    • 13. Glaucoma Cont. • Leading cause of blindness in the United States • Affects over 3 million people • Worldwide it affects close to 67 million people"Living with Glaucoma." National Glaucoma Research. American Health Assistance Foundation, n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2011. <http:/www.ahaf.org/docs/ pdf-publications/livingwithglaucoma.pdf>.
    • 14. “The Sneak Thief of Sight” • Glaucoma is often referred to as “the sneak thief of sight” • People often do not know they have glaucoma until permanent damage has occurred"Living with Glaucoma." National Glaucoma Research. American Health Assistance Foundation, n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2011. <http:/www.ahaf.org/docs/ pdf-publications/livingwithglaucoma.pdf>.
    • 15. Types of Glaucoma • Open-Angle Glaucoma • Closed-Angle Glaucoma • Normal-Tension Glaucoma"Living with Glaucoma." National Glaucoma Research. American Health Assistance Foundation, n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2011. <http:/www.ahaf.org/docs/ pdf-publications/livingwithglaucoma.pdf>.
    • 16. Open Angle Glaucomahttp://www.ohioeyecareconsultants.com/eyeinfo/glaucoma3.jpg"Living with Glaucoma." National Glaucoma Research. American Health Assistance Foundation, n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2011. <http:/www.ahaf.org/docs/ pdf-publications/livingwithglaucoma.pdf>.
    • 17. Closed-Angle Glaucoma"Living with Glaucoma." National Glaucoma Research. American Health Assistance Foundation, n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2011. <http:/www.ahaf.org/docs/ pdf-publications/livingwithglaucoma.pdf>.
    • 18. Acute Closed-Angle"Living with Glaucoma." National Glaucoma Research. American Health Assistance Foundation, n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2011. <http:/www.ahaf.org/docs/ pdf-publications/livingwithglaucoma.pdf>.http://www.hakeem-sy.com/main/files/9-1_0.jpg
    • 19. Chronic Closed-Anglehttp://medicalimages.allrefer.com/large/glaucoma.jpg"Living with Glaucoma." National Glaucoma Research. American Health Assistance Foundation, n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2011. <http:/www.ahaf.org/docs/ pdf-publications/livingwithglaucoma.pdf>.
    • 20. Normal-Tension Glaucoma • There is no build up of the aqueous humor fluid in the eye • It is not well understood what causes the damage to the optic nerve in this type of glaucoma
    • 21. Risk Factors
    • 22. Age-Related Macular Degeneration• Destroys the macula • part of the eye that provides the sharp central vision to help you see objects clearlyAge-Related Macular Degeneration. N.p.: National Institutes of Health, n.d. National Eye Institute. Web. 25 Feb. 2011. <http://www.nei.nih.gov/>.
    • 23. Research Slides• many with citations on the bottom for information and images• approximately 12-20 minutes• prove your thesis
    • 24. • Keep notes in the notes section
    • 25. Videos• Imbed videos into your slides as needed• will break up some of your information and speaking
    • 26. Application Component • Describe in detail your application component • multiple slides • use pictures, videos, ect. • approximately 8-15 min
    • 27. Class Activity• Something creative and fun• Approximately 5 minutes or more
    • 28. Works Cited• No annotations
    • 29. Conclusion• What did you learn?