ION Krakow - A Global IPv6 Deployment Update

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ION Krakow, 30 September 2013: Sander Steffann's "Fortifying the Castle: A Global IPv6 Deployment Update" presentation

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ION Krakow - A Global IPv6 Deployment Update

  1. 1. Fortifying the Castle An Update on Global IPv6 Deployment
  2. 2. Short introduction • Sander Steffann • Independent consultant • LISP service provider • RIPE Address Policy Working Group co-chair • The Netherlands IPv6 Foundation co-founder • Dutch IPv6 TF ISP subgroup
  3. 3. The parts of the story • Transit • Content • Eyeballs • Conclusions
  4. 4. Transit
  5. 5. Transit • Any decent transit provider can provide native IPv6 connectivity these days
  6. 6. Transit • Any decent transit provider can provide native IPv6 connectivity these days • If your transits don’t provide IPv6: • get rid of them and find transits that take their job seriously
  7. 7. Content
  8. 8. Content - reasons • Why do content providers deploy IPv6? • Offer better service than over (slowly degrading) IPv4 • More visibility (addresses not hidden or shared) • Logging, ACLs, traceability etc. • GeoIP based services • Etc.
  9. 9. Content • The big global content providers have shown that providing content on IPv6 can be done safely
  10. 10. Content • The big global content providers have shown that providing content on IPv6 can be done safely • Before World IPv6 Day / Launch there were some issues • Happy Eyeballs (RFC 6555) was unfortunately needed, but it has helped a lot! • A combination of better services, better software and better testing have made IPv6 reliable
  11. 11. Content - remaining issues • There are some remaining issues though • Not all data centres and hosting services support IPv6 yet • Some CDNs charge a monthly extra for IPv6 (outrageous!) • Some content providers think there are no IPv6 eyeballs
  12. 12. http://www.vyncke.org/ipv6status weighted avg top 50 servers
  13. 13. Content - work to be done • Slovenia and Czech Republic lead at the moment • Not much progress since World IPv6 Launch :-( • But providing content on IPv6 is not that hard! • http://www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/resources/maki
  14. 14. Eyeballs
  15. 15. Eyeballs - reasons for users • This is where the IPv4 address shortage is really going to cause pain • Access services use the most address space • Users behind NAT (NAT444, DS-Lite) or only a limited number of ports (MAP)
  16. 16. Eyeballs - reasons for ISPs • IPv4 is getting expensive • Huge shortage on transfer market • Investments in address-sharing solutions • Moving traffic to IPv6 saves money on IPv4 side • And services with large traffic amounts like YouTube and Netflix are available over IPv6!
  17. 17. http://www.vyncke.org/ipv6status IPv6-enabled web browsers
  18. 18. Voetnoot Another view: BitTorrent
  19. 19. Voetnoot Another view: BitTorrent
  20. 20. Conclusions
  21. 21. Conclusions • IPv6 Transits are available • IPv6 Content stable since World IPv6 Launch • This needs to change! • But high-traffic websites are already available over IPv6 • IPv6 Eyeballs is growing fast • Often thanks to a few huge players deploying IPv6
  22. 22. Conclusions • No apparent link between content and eyeballs: • Leaders in content are behind in eyeballs • Leaders in eyeballs are behind in content • Big international content providers dominate, so maybe this is not that important
  23. 23. The end

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