• Powerpoint presentation by Demian Hammock.
 The Re – Purposing of the Old United Church.
Your Sincerely: Demian Hammock...
Why the Town of Sackville NB should care about this project .
The Re – Purposing of the Old United Church !
Architecture A...
Concepts for what can go into the Re Purposed United Church.
• Existing in Town . (Examples)
The Tantramar Family Resource...
OPENING STATEMENT – About the United Church & Why It Needs to be saved.
• This Building Is About Historical As It Gets And...
The Link between the Town and Church and Mount Allison University.
• Established June 1839
• Type :Public
• Religious affi...
Fund raising idea’s in 7 parts. (Index)
Funding for the building it self .
Funding raising for non-profits and small profi...
Example - The Moncton Peace Centre
Precedents it matters, it has been done in past just recently, up the road
& they got f...
The Moncton Peace Center.
• The Moncton Times transcript.
• The non profit organization welcomed visitors during a ceremon...
PEACE CENTRE OFFICIALLY WELCOMES COMMUNITY
• June 11, 2012 - MONCTON (NB) Moncton Times and Transcript
• Robert Goguen, MP...
PEACE CENTRE OFFICIALLY WELCOMES
COMMUNITY
• The Moncton Times and Transcript
• “The Community Peace Centre is an 80,000-s...
PEACE CENTRE OFFICIALLY WELCOMES COMMUNITY
• FOR BROADCAST USE:
• Community spirit filled Moncton’s downtown core today as...
Example of Funding Focus on an Idea
• Funding -WINNIPEG – MUSUEM FOR HUMAN RIGHTS.
• “Funding for the capital costs of the...
The Canadian War Memorial Fund and War Artists
Index:2
• The Canadian War Memorial Fund and War Artists http://www.cmhg.gc...
Building To Honour Graduates Who Died in WWI
A War Memorial Art Gallery – Collection.
• “Some alumni of Mount Allison Univ...
Kate Pilgrim, Administrator
T.R. Meighen Family Foundation
Index:3
• “Prior to 1987, services to students with learning di...
Kate Pilgrim, Administrator
T.R. Meighen Family Foundation
• T.R. Meighen Family Foundation
Fondation de la Famille T.R. M...
Kate Pilgrim, Administrator
T.R. Meighen Family Foundation
•
While the foundation focuses on a small number of major strat...
Kate Pilgrim, Administrator
T.R. Meighen Family Foundation
• Mission Statement – Their Mission Statement, is our Mission S...
Kate Pilgrim, Administrator
T.R. Meighen Family Foundation
• “The first step in applying to the Foundation is a letter of ...
Kate Pilgrim, Administrator
T.R. Meighen Family Foundation
•
• Please note that full proposals are only reviewed upon requ...
Sackville Job Resource Centre
Index:4
Example of a Community Employment Resource
Centre.
Community Employment Resource Cen...
Sackville Job Resource Centre
Example of a Community Employment Resource
Centre.
Community Employment Resource Centre
for ...
Hostelling International
Index:5
• http://www.hihostels.ca/166/Home/About-HI-Canada/index.hostel
• Over 80 years of hostel...
Hostelling International
• NEW BRUNSWICK
• FREDERICTON - the provincial capital, hosts a unique art gallery, The Beaverbro...
Example Of Renting Out Meeting Spaces for Meeting And Small
Business Non Profit and Profit.
Index:6
• “Edmonton’s non-prof...
Why Creativity is the New Economy?
Index:7
• “Florida describes the Creative Class as comprising 40 million workers (about...
Characterized by the 3 T's - Talent, Technology, and
Tolerance.
• “As Florida demonstrates in his books, Buffalo, New Orle...
Characterized by the 3 T's - Talent, Technology, and
Tolerance.
• “1. Conventional wisdom holds that, to boost an area's e...
Nonprofits Make Work Meaningful and Fun for Their
Employees, why people like working for nonprofits.
• “Open and transpare...
The University and the Creative Economy - Creative Class Group
• “and spin-off companies, universities are often at the cu...
Quick ways of getting funding.
• Ways to get Funding – First all get the right people on the board – Honorary broad member...
Quick ways of getting funding
Mount Allison University.
• Arsenault, Pierre L, Mr.2400Athletic Directorplarsenault@mta.caA...
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Demian hammock church project

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OPENING STATEMENT – About the United Church & Why It Needs to be saved.

This Building Is About Historical As It Gets And Need To Be Saved For The Greater Good.

By working together and thinking outside the box and putting our differences behind us this can indeed happen and, be a win-win for all stakeholders. Residents Sackville, mount Allison University and the province of New Brunswick. Instead of lagging behind let’s be a model for what a community can and should be.

By Demian Hammock: Short Essay.

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  • OPENING STATEMENT – About the United Church & Why It Needs to be saved.

    This Building Is About Historical As It Gets And Need To Be Saved For The Greater Good.

    By working together and thinking outside the box and putting our differences behind us this can indeed happen and, be a win-win for all stakeholders. Residents Sackville, mount Allison University and the province of New Brunswick. Instead of lagging behind let’s be a model for what a community can and should be.

    By Demian Hammock: Short Essay.
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Demian hammock church project

  1. 1. • Powerpoint presentation by Demian Hammock.  The Re – Purposing of the Old United Church. Your Sincerely: Demian Hammock - (BFA) Bachelor of Fine Art & Advance Diploma in Human Resource Management demian.hammock@gmail.com Also reachable on LinkedIn – Demian Hammock Phone cell 506 380 9176 Home 506 536 1896 28/06/2013 1
  2. 2. Why the Town of Sackville NB should care about this project . The Re – Purposing of the Old United Church ! Architecture And Economic Hub of Sackville N.B. The Re - Purpose United Church – The Future Of Sackville N.B. Seeing Beyond Your Own Circumstance.  How the Town of Sackville will benefit, by increasing it’s tax base. Meaning more full time residents working in Sackville NB, be it local residents or Mont Allison students staying to work after graduating. • - A great example being Jack Stewart - Soricimed Biopharma Inc. - E.G. The Rise Of The Creative Class – By Richard Florida Let’s make it Happen !  Letting Sackville, NB, grow it’s economic base by keeping it talent here.  Our greatest export will no longer be it’s people. e.g. The Rise Of The Creative Class.  Sackville, NB, will be a magnet for it’s own talent and talent from around the world.  Low overhead and big returns. 28/06/2013 2
  3. 3. Concepts for what can go into the Re Purposed United Church. • Existing in Town . (Examples) The Tantramar Family Resource Center. (Non- Profit) The Day Break Program. (Non- Profit) Live Bait Theater Company. (Non- Profit) Perhaps for the furture. (Profits) • Not yet Existing in Town.(Examples) A real Job Resource Centre for the town. (Non- Profit) An International Hostel .(Profit) Rented Space for meeting and small business. (Profit)  In Sequence Of Order, Actually Getting it Done ! Funding for Building to bring up to code etc. though a variety of sources. Operational cost for Non – Profits, though a variety of sources. Bring in small Profits business to help off set the cost of the Non- Profits. 28/06/2013 3
  4. 4. OPENING STATEMENT – About the United Church & Why It Needs to be saved. • This Building Is About Historical As It Gets And Need To Be Saved For The Greater Good. • The United Church that stands literally on the corner of Main Street and York Street, is indisputably the most important historical link between the Town and the University. This historical monument cannot be destroyed. Its precedents to this community is too important. Though the congregation for the United Church has shrunk and is no longer being used, I believe it's founder Charles Allison would be proud to see it repurposed for the community for the greater good. As he did as the first founder of this institution meaning; the United Church and Mount Allison University. • It must be retained historically and for the greater good to be a link between the Town and the University. This church can be the cornerstone of architectural and economic development for the community, as it was in the past. • There are many examples of how United Church can be repurposed successfully. As one can see with precedents like the Peace Tower in Moncton New Brunswick and the Human Rights Museum in Winnipeg Manitoba. • As notable scholar Richard Florida explains the three T’s are undoubtedly the key to the future for University towns like Sackville New Brunswick. The 3 T’s of course standing for Talent Technology and most important Tolerance. Something the founder Charles Anderson Mount Allison University I'm sure would greatly approve of. • This can be a new beginning for the Town and the University to work together. Not only for non-profits but for small businesses and community spaces that could be rented out. Though investment would be required up front for the building and operation cost. In the long run I believe it would be the best investment this community has ever seen. In effect retaining existing and incoming talent to stay in the community. Meaning instead of losing return on investment being Mount Allison students and Locals, turning around in keeping this talent bring in a tax base to build a monument future for Sackville New Brunswick. By reading the following documentation. I believe one can see there is plenty of precedents for funding to make this happen. Be it the building of operations costs. • By working together and thinking outside the box and putting our differences behind us this can indeed happen and, be a win-win for all stakeholders. Residents Sackville, mount Allison University and the province of New Brunswick. Instead of lagging behind let’s be a model for what a community can and should be. • By Demian Hammock: Short Essay. 28/06/2013 4
  5. 5. The Link between the Town and Church and Mount Allison University. • Established June 1839 • Type :Public • Religious affiliation :United Church of Canada • Endowment :$110 million • “The university's affiliation was transferred to the United Church of Canada following church union in 1925. Original components of the university included: the Mount Allison Wesleyan Academy for Boys (1840–1958), the Ladies' College (1854–1958), and Mount Allison College. Mount Allison College was established in 1862 with degree-granting powers on behalf of the other two.” • “Mount Allison's origins go back to a boys' academy founded in June 1839 by a local Methodist merchant, Charles Frederick Allison. Charles Allison's grandfather had emigrated from Ireland to Canada in the late 18th century because of the after effects of a dinner with the local government tax collector. Wanting to impress the man, the family had set the table with their one valuable possession; silver spoons. After entertaining their guest, the Allisons were informed by the tax collector that if they could afford silver spoons, then they could certainly afford to pay more taxes. The Allisons left Ireland shortly thereafter. The offending spoons are now on display in the main university library.” • • “In June 1839, Charles Allison proposed to the Wesleyan Methodists that a school of elementary and higher learning be built. He offered to purchase a site in Sackville, to erect a suitable building for an academy, and to contribute operating funds of £100 a year for 10 years. This offer was accepted and the Wesleyan Academy for boys subsequently opened in 1843.[7] • Mount Allison University is a United Church-affiliated, but non-sectarian university which was established at Sackville, New Brunswick on January 19, 1843. The university was named after Charles Frederick Allison, in honour of his gift of land and money.[8] Its origins were steeped in the Methodist faith. It was designed to prepare men for the ministry and to supply education for lay members.[9] The university was chartered on April 14, 1849.*8+” • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Allison_University 28/06/2013 5
  6. 6. Fund raising idea’s in 7 parts. (Index) Funding for the building it self . Funding raising for non-profits and small profit business. Index :1 -3 • 1 - Peace Tower in Moncton NB ( Example Fund Raising for Building & Operational Cost for Non Profits.)  The Peace Tower in Moncton NB. Precedence that has worked in past of a similar nature. Also a good Example the - Winnipeg Museum Of Human Rights • 2 - Funds for the restructuring of the church as a War Memorial, ( Example Fund Raising for Building.) to replace the building that was torn down recently .  Funding - The Canadian War Memorial Fund and War Artists. Mount Allison University it self for diplomatic reasons. • 3 - Funding - T.R. Meighen Family Foundation • ( Example Fund Raising for Building & Operational Cost for Non Profits.)  A foundation that given money to MTA Meighen foundation with students with disabilities. Could help with funds for programs like The Tantramar Family Resource Center, The Day Break Program and a Resource Job Center. Index : 4 -7 • 4 - Sackville Job Resource Centre ( Fund Raising for Operational Cost for Non Profits.)  Example - Community Employment Resource Centre for Kanata and West-Ottawa. • 5 - Funds Raising - via using part of the Church at an International Hostel. ( Fund Raising for Operational for Profit.)  An example Hostelling International-Canada (HI-Canada or HI-C) is a not- for-profit, member-based organization, and a national member of the International Youth Hostel Federation (IYHF - brand named "Hostelling International"), Though the Hostel them selves make money. • 6- Renting space out for organizations ( Fund Raising for Operational for Profit.)  Meeting space for small organization, and space for small independent business. • 7 – Richard Florida – Noted Author on Urban Development. ( Fund Raising for Operational for Profit. General Concept for Economic Development for the Town of Sackville (ROI) Return on Investment. )  The Rise of the Creative Class The 3 T’s – Talent, Technology, Tolerance. 28/06/2013 6
  7. 7. Example - The Moncton Peace Centre Precedents it matters, it has been done in past just recently, up the road & they got funding for the building and operational costs. Index:1 Moncton The Peace Tower. The Moncton Times and Transcript. • MONCTON, N.B. - An official grand opening ceremony was held at the Community Peace Centre in downtown Moncton today. Hundreds were on hand as the ribbon was cut on the 80,000 square foot building, adjacent to Central United Church. Greater Moncton MP Robert Goguen was among the dignitaries praising the work of the numerous non-profit organizations now together under one roof. “Each of these valued groups is playing a significant role in keeping our region strong through their respective missions.” Social Development Minister Sue Stultz says the facility is a good example of the province partnering with other levels of government. “It’s the benchmark for an enhanced quality of life for many families and individuals, bringing many important services for our youth, our seniors, our environment under one roof.” The grand opening events at the Peace Centre will continue until Wednesday with public tours and workships available. Image Of The Peace Tower. 28/06/2013 7
  8. 8. The Moncton Peace Center. • The Moncton Times transcript. • The non profit organization welcomed visitors during a ceremony to mark the facility’s official opening. • “Our Government’s top priority is job creation, economic growth and long-term prosperity,” said Mr. Goguen. “The Peace Centre offers community- focused non-profit organizations a collective space in which they can house their operations in a cost effective manner in order to best deliver their services to area residents. A strong not-for-profit sector that can help address the social needs of a community is in line with our Economic Action Plan.” • “The opening of the Community Peace Centre is the benchmark for an enhanced quality of life for many families and individuals” said Stultz. “Bringing many important services for our youth, our seniors, our environment all under one roof will help better serve our community. Partnerships such as these will help us work toward rebuilding New Brunswick together.” • “The Community Peace Centre is an 80,000-square foot facility that brings together various non-profit groups, allowing them to share resources and improve operational efficiencies. The six organizations that make up the Community Peace Centre Inc. are the Central United Church, the United Way of Greater Moncton and Southeastern New Brunswick, Family Services of Moncton Inc., Volunteer Centre of Southeastern New Brunswick Inc., Early Childhood Stimulation Inc., and the Multicultural Association of Greater Moncton Area Inc.” 28/06/2013 8
  9. 9. PEACE CENTRE OFFICIALLY WELCOMES COMMUNITY • June 11, 2012 - MONCTON (NB) Moncton Times and Transcript • Robert Goguen, MP for Moncton-Riverview-Dieppe, on behalf of the Honourable Bernard Valcourt, Minister of State for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency and La Francophonie; and the Honourable Sue Stultz, Minister of Social Development and Minister Responsible for Seniors, Housing and Community Non-Profit Organizations, today attended the grand opening of the Community Peace Centre in Moncton. The non profit organization welcomed visitors during a ceremony to mark the facility’s official opening. • “Our Government’s top priority is job creation, economic growth and long-term prosperity,” said Mr. Goguen. “The Peace Centre offers community- focused non-profit organizations a collective space in which they can house their operations in a cost effective manner in order to best deliver their services to area residents. A strong not-for-profit sector that can help address the social needs of a community is in line with our Economic Action Plan.” • “The opening of the Community Peace Centre is the benchmark for an enhanced quality of life for many families and individuals” said Stultz. “Bringing many important services for our youth, our seniors, our environment all under one roof will help better serve our community. Partnerships such as these will help us work toward rebuilding New Brunswick together.” 28/06/2013 9
  10. 10. PEACE CENTRE OFFICIALLY WELCOMES COMMUNITY • The Moncton Times and Transcript • “The Community Peace Centre is an 80,000-square foot facility that brings together various non-profit groups, allowing them to share resources and improve operational efficiencies. The six organizations that make up the Community Peace Centre Inc. are the Central United Church, the United Way of Greater Moncton and Southeastern New Brunswick, Family Services of Moncton Inc., Volunteer Centre of Southeastern New Brunswick Inc., Early Childhood Stimulation Inc., and the Multicultural Association of Greater Moncton Area Inc. “ • “The theme of our Community Peace Centre Grand Opening is A Global Thought; A Local Action,” said Annette Vautour-MacKay, Chair of the Board of Directors for the Community Peace Centre. “The theme brings many ideas to mind; for us, however, it’s a straight forward reminder that changing the world begins right where you are, right in your very own community. The synergy created by the not-for-profits coming together in the Peace Centre has been a powerful local action.” • The Centre facilities include common meeting rooms, a public resource centre and an auditorium. The project involved two development components: the renovation of the existing auditorium, kitchen and rectory for use by the not-for-profit tenants; and the construction of the new multi-level office complex. 28/06/2013 10
  11. 11. PEACE CENTRE OFFICIALLY WELCOMES COMMUNITY • FOR BROADCAST USE: • Community spirit filled Moncton’s downtown core today as the Community Peace Centre welcomed visitors during a ceremony to mark the facility’s official opening. • On hand for the event were Robert Goguen, MP for Moncton-Riverview-Dieppe, and the Honourable Sue Stultz, Minister of Social Development and Minister Responsible for Seniors, Housing and Community Non-Profit Organizations. • The Community Peace Centre is an 80,000-square foot facility that brings together various non-profit groups, allowing them to share resources and improve operational efficiencies. • -30- • INFORMATION:  Peggy Bélanger (Important) Senior Communications Officer ACOA New Brunswick11 506-452-2466  Annette Vautour-MacKay (Important) Chair, Board of Directors, Community Peace Centre Inc./Executive Director, Volunteer Centre of Southeastern New Brunswick Inc. 506-869-6825  Bruce Macfarlane (Important) Communications Director Economic Development 506-453-8607 28/06/2013 11
  12. 12. Example of Funding Focus on an Idea • Funding -WINNIPEG – MUSUEM FOR HUMAN RIGHTS. • “Funding for the capital costs of the CMHR is coming from three jurisdictions of government, the federal Crown, the provincial Crown, and the City of Winnipeg, as well as private donations. The total budget for the building of the exterior of the CMHR and its contents was $310 million as of February 2011. • To date, the Government of Canada has allocated $100 million, the Government of Manitoba has donated $40 million, and the City of Winnipeg has donated $20 million.[10] The Friends of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights, led by Gail Asper, have raised more than $130 million in private donations from across Canada toward a final goal of $150 million.[11] These "private sector" pledges include $4.5 million from provincial crown corporations in Manitoba and $5 million from the government of Ontario.[12] The Canadian Museum for Human Rights has requested an additional $35 million in capital funding from the federal government to cover shortfalls. In April 2011, the CMHR received an additional $3.6 million from the City of Winnipeg, which was actually taken from a federal grant to the city in lieu of taxes for the museum.[13] • Once the CMHR is open, the operating budget will be provided by the government of Canada, as the CMHR is a national museum. The estimated operating costs to the federal government are $22 million annually. In December 2011, the CMHR announced that due to rising costs for the interior exhibits of the museum, the total construction cost had increased by an additional $41 million to a new total of $351 million.[14] In July 2012, the federal and provincial governments agreed to further increase the capital funding to the CMHR by up to $70 million, through a combination of a federal loan and a provincial loan guarantee. This newest funding was essential for the completion of the interior exhibits, so that the museum could officially open by the spring of 2014, already two years behind schedule.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Museum_for_Human_Rights 28/06/2013 12
  13. 13. The Canadian War Memorial Fund and War Artists Index:2 • The Canadian War Memorial Fund and War Artists http://www.cmhg.gc.ca/cmh/page-747-eng.asp • “Sir Max Aitken was a wealthy Canadian who emigrated to England in 1914. In 1917 he was awarded the title Lord Beaverbrook and later became one of Winston Churchill's valued advisors. In 1916, faced with the Canadian government's inertia on some matters connected with the First World War, Aitken saw to the establishment of a Canadian War Records Office, a collection of photographs, maps, and unit and personal war diaries documenting Canada's military participation in the Great War. Sam Hughes, the minister of militia and defence, assumed responsibility for the Office, and Aitken solicited his support for the addition of an artistic dimension to the collection. When Hughes was ousted by Prime Minister Borden, Aitken hastily established the Canadian War Memorial Fund to send artists to the front. The government gave the artists a rank and paid them, but the Fund, a private corporation, managed them, took the credit for their work and assumed ownership of the growing collection. A. Y Jackson, David Milne and H.J. Mowatt are unquestionably the best known of the war artists. These men would be joined by female artists, although women were not allowed at the front. Florence Carlyle's portraits, executed mainly in London, include one of Lady Drummond, who headed the Canadian Red Cross there; this picture was funded by the Memorial Fund. In 1914 Caroline Arlington and her husband, architectural engravers living in Paris, offered their services to the Fund, but only Caroline's were used. Two of her etchings were accepted: The British Army and Navy Leave Club, Paris, named for a spot popular with the Canadian troops. In 1918 the Fund extended its activities to the home front, and the National Gallery selected 20 artists, including four women - Mabel May, Frances” 28/06/2013 13
  14. 14. Building To Honour Graduates Who Died in WWI A War Memorial Art Gallery – Collection. • “Some alumni of Mount Allison University are planning to meet with the university's board of regents on Friday in the hope of saving the old Memorial Library. • The building was built in 1927 to honour students and graduates who died in the First World War, but the facility is now on the chopping block.” • http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new- brunswick/story/2011/09/22/nb-mount-allison-library-901.html • Why War Memorials work . As part of the reconstruction let have an art competition for an art work in front of the Church. In the Memory of these Veterans lets have it dedicated to a number of non profits and perhaps a war memory inside the church dedicated to loss of life. • Why It Works • The memorial is an unusual type of public space in that activity is focused on memories of the Vietnam War. Its great success derives from giving visitors the opportunity, through the simple but powerful wall, to walk its length, look at the names, and touch them. Two sloping arms of polished black granite, set in a wide V shape, are engraved with the names of the more than 58,000 American soldiers who died in the course of the Vietnam War. As visitors proceed along the path at the base of the monument, their reflections pass across the soldiers' names, listed one by one in order of casualty. “ • http://www.pps.org/great_public_spaces/one?public_place_id=1 18 28/06/2013 14
  15. 15. Kate Pilgrim, Administrator T.R. Meighen Family Foundation Index:3 • “Prior to 1987, services to students with learning disabilities were provided, on an ad hoc basis, by members of the Department of Education. In 1987 the Senate of Mount Allison University approved its first written Policy on Students with Learning Disabilities and this led to the creation of the Centre for Learning Assistance and Research (CLAR) and to the establishment of a program for students with a learning disability. This policy was updated in 2000. • Read the policy on Students with Disabilities A New Name In the Fall of 1994 the Centre for Learning Assistance and Research (CLAR) became known as The Meighen Centre for Learning Assistance and Research. This change was to honour a generous donation to the Centre from the T. R. Meighen Foundation of St. Andrews, New Brunswick. • A New Home In the Fall of 2008 the Meighen Centre moved into the completely renovated Wallace McCain Student Centre. For the first time it was housed in a space specifically designed to meet the needs of students with a learning disability. “ • http://www.meighen.ca/contact.html 28/06/2013 15
  16. 16. Kate Pilgrim, Administrator T.R. Meighen Family Foundation • T.R. Meighen Family Foundation Fondation de la Famille T.R. Meighen  “The T.R. Meighen Family Foundation is a private charitable foundation that was established by letters patent in April 1969 with a gift from the founder, Mr. Theodore Roosevelt Meighen. The head office is located in St. Andrews, New Brunswick and the administrative office is in Toronto, Ontario. Over the past 41 years, the foundation has granted close to $20 million (Important) dollars to various projects. Most of this support has been directed to community-based activities in the fields of education, health, social welfare, cultural and environmental conservation. • The foundation's administrative office was moved from St. Andrews to Toronto in 1998. This has allowed the foundation to focus its grant making not only in New Brunswick but also in Southern Ontario and the Montreal area. • Mr. Theodore Roosevelt Meighen Theodore (Ted) Meighen was born in Portage La Prairie, Manitoba in 1905. He attended the Royal Military College in Kingston before reading Law at L'Université Laval in Quebec City. He practiced law in Montreal and became a senior partner in the firm of McMaster Meighen. During World War II, he served in the Royal Canadian Artillery in England and Canada and retired with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. He was very active in the Montreal community where he lived with his wife Margaret (Peggy). He worked as a volunteer in many organizations in the health and welfare fields. • He was the son of the Rt. Hon. Arthur Meighen, a former Prime Minister of Canada, and Jessie Isabel Meighen. • While Mr. Meighen lived primarily in Montreal, he also had a house in St. Andrews, New Brunswick. He chose St. Andrews as the site of foundation's head office because it was situated in New Brunswick, which, in his view, offered opportunities for constructive giving” 28/06/2013 16
  17. 17. Kate Pilgrim, Administrator T.R. Meighen Family Foundation • While the foundation focuses on a small number of major strategic initiatives and commitments, it also provides a limited number of smaller grants to a variety of organizations each year. Some of the foundation's current major commitments are: • · Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) • · Evergreen • · Homes First Foundation • · McGill University • · Mount Allison University • · SunLife Financial Chair in Adolescent Mental Health • · Sunnybrook Hospital • · Thinkable • · University of Western Ontario 28/06/2013 17
  18. 18. Kate Pilgrim, Administrator T.R. Meighen Family Foundation • Mission Statement – Their Mission Statement, is our Mission Statement ! • The T.R. Meighen Family Foundation wishes to encourage strategic and creative initiatives in Toronto, Montreal and New Brunswick that benefit youth at risk, education, and mental health research with a focus on youth and families. • Criteria • We want to: (Important) – Because this is what we are trying to do !  1) Support initiatives addressing systemic change by organizations seeking to act in innovative or non traditional ways, whether or not the organization itself might be described as traditional.  2) Provide funding at a crucial time in the evolution of a program or organization.  3) Promote interaction among individuals and organizations that may have differing perspectives and experiences.  4) Support initiatives that have the potential for a multiplier effect in the community.  5) Help organizations become more relevant and ensure their success in moving forward. At the present time the foundation is focusing on a limited number of new initiatives. We welcome letters of inquiry on an ongoing basis from organizations that align with our criteria for funding. Please be aware that all letters of inquiry and proposals are read and it may take approximately six to eight weeks to receive feedback. 28/06/2013 18
  19. 19. Kate Pilgrim, Administrator T.R. Meighen Family Foundation • “The first step in applying to the Foundation is a letter of inquiry. Letters may be submitted at any time. We will acknowledge the receipt of each letter indicating whether or not a full proposal is to be requested. Please note that a proposal request is not a guarantee of funding. • Submitting a Letter of Inquiry Letters of inquiry should be no more than two single-sided typewritten pages and should include the following: • · A clear statement of purpose of the organization seeking support • · A description of the proposed activity • · A statement of how the initiative fits the Foundation's granting criteria • · A list of key participants and collaborators • · An estimated budget and time frame • · The organization's legal name, address and contact numbers • · The amount of funding requested • · Canada Customs and Revenue Agency Charitable Registration BN • · The extent and type of volunteer engagement within your organization” • Please send letters of inquiry to: T.R. Meighen Family Foundation 12 Birch Avenue, Suite 200 Toronto, Ontario M4V 1C8 admin@meighen.ca 28/06/2013 19
  20. 20. Kate Pilgrim, Administrator T.R. Meighen Family Foundation • • Please note that full proposals are only reviewed upon request of the foundation. The proposal narrative must not exceed 10 typewritten pages single-sided. • 1. Executive Summary Provide a summary of your proposal including amount requested. • 2. Background Information Provide the history and purpose of your organization including information on the group or community that you serve. • 3. Rationale Provide a statement of how the initiative fits our granting focus. Describe how this initiative fits your organization's objectives, how it will benefit others, and why your organization is best qualified to carry it out. If the project is a collaboration, include a brief description of each partner, each organization's role in the project, and the reasons for forming the partnership. • 4. Specific Request Give a detailed description of the project and its objectives including evidence of community engagement, geographic area to be served, and time frame of the project. Provide a work plan, anticipated results and an evaluation plan that includes specific measures. • 5. Financial Information Provide a detailed project budget. If this request is for partial funding of a project, indicate which expenses would be covered by a grant from the foundation and which would be supported with other sources of funding. Specify all other requested and confirmed sources of funding. If the project is long term, discuss its future viability and funding prospects. • Please provide audited financial statements of your organization for the past two years; a copy of the operating budget for the current year; and a copy of your most recent annual report. • 6. Personnel Information Please provide a list of your organization's board of directors, and a list of any relevant committees or advisory groups. The foundation would also like a list of personnel implementing the project and their qualifications. If volunteers will be part of the project please indicate what role they will play. • 7. Supporting Documentation Any additional attachments to the documentation requested above may be included. Please note that these attachments will be used as background information and it should not be assumed that the full board would review all attachments. • http://www.meighen.ca/ 28/06/2013 20
  21. 21. Sackville Job Resource Centre Index:4 Example of a Community Employment Resource Centre. Community Employment Resource Centre for Kanata and West-Ottawa • • Community Employment Resource Centre (CERC) is a not-for- profit community-based organization with over 26 years of providing high quality employment services to the Ottawa community. CERC is a service of the John Howard Society of Ottawa. This Employment Ontario program is funded in part by the Government of Canada. • Our Mission • Our mission is to help people in our community find their strengths and reach their potential in the workplace and society, through assistance with finding and keeping employment. • Our Vision • Our vision is for a community where people are empowered, informed, treated as equals, and valued for their contributions to the work force and society. • Our Services Our Services • Résumé development • Job search assistance • One-on-one Employment Counselling • Career interest assessments • Apprenticeship information • Second Career assessments • Summer Jobs for students • Labour Market Information 28/06/2013 21
  22. 22. Sackville Job Resource Centre Example of a Community Employment Resource Centre. Community Employment Resource Centre for Kanata and West-Ottawa • At this point, our workshops include: • Career Discovery • Effective Job Search • Interview Preparation • Smart Serve • WHMIS - online training • Social Media for the Job Search • Introduction to Apprenticeship • Grabba Java (Networking for Job Search) • Online Application Clinic • Resume Clinic Funding for this center came from. This Employment Ontario program is funded in part by the Government of Canada. • CERC is a service of the John Howard Society of Ottawa. • Source of Website. • http://www.cercottawa.ca/ 28/06/2013 22
  23. 23. Hostelling International Index:5 • http://www.hihostels.ca/166/Home/About-HI-Canada/index.hostel • Over 80 years of hostelling experience in Canada • Hostelling International-Canada (HI-Canada or HI-C) is a not-for-profit, member-based organization, and a national member of the International Youth Hostel Federation (IYHF - brand named "Hostelling International"), the largest travel association in the world. HI-Canada has now a network of 60 hostels, from coast to coast; some owned, some affiliated. Hostels affiliated with HI-Canada are regularly inspected for high standards of cleanliness, safety, environmental sustainability and available facilities. • • The practice of hostelling was brought to Canada more than 80 years ago, but HI-Canada's mission is much the same today: to help make travel affordable and practical for everyone, especially young people -- making it possible for anyone to experience different cultures, languages and landscapes, and create enriching and life-long memories and friendships. More on HI-Canada's History... • Hostelling International Membership • Membership is the heart and soul of hostelling. A membership with Hostelling International is more than just an affordable place to sleep on your travels. By joining our association of travellers, HI hostels will open the door to meeting new people, learning about amazing places and understanding different cultures. Your Hostelling International membership will help you see the world while supporting our mission. • Toll Free : • 1.800.663.5777 28/06/2013 23
  24. 24. Hostelling International • NEW BRUNSWICK • FREDERICTON - the provincial capital, hosts a unique art gallery, The Beaverbrook, internationally known for its outstanding collection of British paintings. Visit Kings Landing historical site or Officers Square with free concerts and live bands. Cycle the river front, try an architectural tour or see an outdoor movie in the park. * Stay at HI-Fredericton, a former monastery, located around the corner from Queens Square Park. • GRAND MANAN ISLAND - located in The Bay of Fundy - known for the highest tides in the world. These waters are populated with whales, dolphins, porpoises, fish, seals, seabirds and more. Try kayaking, hiking, beach combing or bird watching. * Stay at HI-Grand Manan, recently added to the HI-Canada network. Newly renovated to keep up with the modern traveller's needs, it retains the charm and history of a 100 year old Sea Captains house. • CAMPBELLTON - perfect for fishermen seeking Atlantic salmon. Rent a canoe or kayak and explore the Restigouche River, or hike up Sugarloaf Mountain for a breath-taking view. Mountain bikes are available for rent on the only lift serviced bike trails in Atlantic Canada. * Stay at HI-Campbellton Lighthouse, HI-Canada's only operating lighthouse 28/06/2013 24
  25. 25. Example Of Renting Out Meeting Spaces for Meeting And Small Business Non Profit and Profit. Index:6 • “Edmonton’s non-profit and community based organizations contribute significantly to Edmonton’s overall quality of life and improve Edmontonians’ ability to connect with each other and build community. They provide diverse opportunities to access services, and participate in activities, programs or events. These organizations are increasingly challenged to find suitable space from which to provide programming and services to Edmontonians. • Non-profit organizations may want access to space in a variety of ways (renting, leasing, sharing and/or developing space). Finding space, whether it is to offer a program or to build a facility, can be a challenging task. The resources below and the related links are meant to assist non-profit organizations in Edmonton with addressing these challenges. • Edmonton SpaceFinder is a new website that connects Edmonton non-profit organizations that need space with those who have available space. It was developed in collaboration by the Arts Habitat Association of Edmonton, the Edmonton Chamber of Voluntary Organizations, the Multicultural Coalition for Equity in Health and Wellbeing and the City of Edmonton.” • http://www.edmonton.ca/for_residents/programs/space-for-non-profit-organizat.aspx 28/06/2013 25
  26. 26. Why Creativity is the New Economy? Index:7 • “Florida describes the Creative Class as comprising 40 million workers (about 30 percent of the U.S. workforce). he breaks the class into two broad sections, derived from Standard Occupational Classification System codes: • Super-Creative Core: This group comprises about 12 percent of all U.S. jobs. It includes a wide range of occupations (e.g. science, engineering, education, computer programming, research), with arts, design, and media workers forming a small subset. Florida considers those belonging to this group to “fully engage in the creative process” (2002, p. 69). The Super-Creative Core is considered innovative, creating commercial products and consumer goods. The primary job function of its members is to be creative and innovative. “Along with problem solving, their work may entail problem finding” (Florida, 2002, p. 69). • Creative Professionals: These professionals are the classic knowledge-based workers and include those working in healthcare, business and finance, the legal sector, and education. They “draw on complex bodies of knowledge to solve specific problems” using higher degrees of education to do so (Florida, 2002). • In addition to these two main groups of creative people, the usually much smaller group of Bohemians is also included in the Creative Class” 28/06/2013 26
  27. 27. Characterized by the 3 T's - Talent, Technology, and Tolerance. • “As Florida demonstrates in his books, Buffalo, New Orleans and Louisville are examples of cities which have tried to attract the Creative Class but, in comparison to cities which better exemplify the "three 'T's", have failed. Creative Class workers have sought out cities that better accommodate their cultural, creative, and technological needs” 28/06/2013 27
  28. 28. Characterized by the 3 T's - Talent, Technology, and Tolerance. • “1. Conventional wisdom holds that, to boost an area's economy, it's necessary to attract large companies and thus create jobs. In fact, companies locate where the talent is; all the tax breaks in the world won't bring a large company to your area if they can't find the quality of employees they want there. Often, too, the talent itself will generate new companies and create jobs that way. • 2. Urban planners assume that, to attract talent/jobs, what's important is to provide infrastructure: sports stadiums, freeways, shopping centers, etc. In fact, creative people prefer authenticity -- so making your city just like everyplace else is a sure way to kill its attractiveness. 3. Creative people tend to be tolerant of anyone who isn't "mainstream"; a city that's run by a conservative good-ole-boys network isn't a good place to try to start a business unless you're one of the good ole boys. • The book is primarily descriptive and analytical, rather than prescriptive. But I feel it's immensely valuable for pointing out that much of the conventional wisdom about economic development and community planning is just plain wrong, and suggesting alternative approaches that have a greater chance of succeeding. And I'm amused (and bemused) by the reviewers who sneered that this book propounds an elitist, liberal, contempt-for-the-working-masses view of American society. To me, the book is almost TOO descriptive: didn't these reviewers read the many statistical tables and the lengthy analyses that the author provides? Fact: The most economically successful cities and regions have these characteristics. That isn't propaganda; it's the way things work. “ 28/06/2013 28
  29. 29. Nonprofits Make Work Meaningful and Fun for Their Employees, why people like working for nonprofits. • “Open and transparent; strong and focused corporate culture. • Employees have confidence in the leadership of their organizations. • Employees believe that they have enough authority to do their job,s and that they have a stake in their work. • Foster a sense of mutual respect. • Build a sense of community and family among staff. • Help employees experience the joy in helping others. • Communicate how each employee's contribution makes the work of the organization possible. • Provide opportunities to relax and socialize. Examples include retreats, potluck dinners, recognition awards, holiday parties, athletic tournaments. • Make the work environment competitive yet fun. • Foster work/family balance and make employees feels cared for. • Environment results in employees willing to give extra effort to help the organization succeed. • Environment has a distinct personality or spirit that invigorates employees. • Encourage new ideas, solicit ideas, reward ideas. • An emphasis on learning. “ 28/06/2013 29
  30. 30. The University and the Creative Economy - Creative Class Group • “and spin-off companies, universities are often at the cutting edge of ... increase average annual earnings, with the most substantial effects occurring in small and ..... Nationwide, university towns tend to be among most the diverse regions.” 28/06/2013 30
  31. 31. Quick ways of getting funding. • Ways to get Funding – First all get the right people on the board – Honorary broad members. • Name the Building after John Lafford, the Father former school teacher. The John Lafford Art and Culture Center. • Jack Stewart Soricimed Biopharma Inc. is a success story in translational research: taking technology from the academic research bench to private industry. Work that began out of curiosity in Professor Jack Stewart’s research lab at Mount Allison University in Sackville, New Brunswick, Canada, was moved into the private sector in 2005. Initially starting as BioProspecting NB Inc., a private, early-stage drug development company, Professor Stewart’s discovery of a proprietary bi-functional paralytic peptide, soricidin, with ion channel modulating characteristics soon became much more. - See more at: • Moneris Solutions is Canada’s largest processor and acquirer of debit and credit card payments.[citationneeded] Moneris was established in December 2000 as a joint investment between RBC Royal Bank and BMO Bank of Montreal.[1] The company is headquartered in Toronto, Ontario and has a contact centre in Sackville, New Brunswick.[2] Moneris’ U.S. operations (formerly known as Harris Bank Merchant Services/The Charge-It-System) are based in Schaumburg, Illinois. • Moneris processes more than 3 billion transactions a year for over 350,000 merchant locations and employs more than 1,900 people across North America.[3] • I will talk to HR. 28/06/2013 31
  32. 32. Quick ways of getting funding Mount Allison University. • Arsenault, Pierre L, Mr.2400Athletic Directorplarsenault@mta.caATHL • Milner, Chris, Mr.2244Budget Managercmilner@mta.ca • - Indiegogo : http://www.indiegogo.com/ The world's funding platform. Go fund yourself. -Kickstarter: http:// www.kickstarter.com/ Fund raising platform Also let open something quickly like a art Gallery showing local work, also an out sculpture Space to draw people in. Get a quick buzz. 28/06/2013 32
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