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How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response
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How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response

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Learn more about how social media is shaping disaster response.

Learn more about how social media is shaping disaster response.

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  • Let’s talk about The internet and what has changed in ~ 12 years----Internet is the change agent. Mobility, mobile access, and mobile strategies are absolutely critical.This data is for Americans, all last half of 2013http://pewinternet.org/Static-Pages/Data-Tools/Get-the-Latest-Statistics/Infographics.aspx?start=1&x=x&x=x#ListContinue
  • Social media employ web- and mobile-based technologies to support interactive dialogue and introduce substantial and pervasive changes to communication between organizations, communities, and individuals.ErikQualman is Often called a Digital Dale Carnegie, an author of Socialnomics, Digital Leader and Crisis. He is also an international keynote speaker speaking on Gen Y motivation, digital leadership, digital media and future trends.According to socialmouths, YouTube now 2nd largest search engine in world. http://socialmouths.com/blog/2013/02/12/youtube-in-2013/1229 Hospitals responded to a Social Media Survey at ebennett.org in 2012: ~ 1070 hospitals had FB pages, NY hospitals had highest of this~ 815 hospitals had twitter accounts, FL hospitals had highest of this~ 575 had YT channels~ 150 had blogs~ 560 had LinkedIn accountsRetrieved healthcare stats July 20121229 hospitals responded, nearly all have FB pages, most have Twitter, half on YouTube, half on Lin, few blogs. According to Mayo Clinic SM book (released Oct 2012): 1500 hosp using SM, ~180 have blogsPop Blog Platforms: WrdPress, G Blogger, Tumblr, JuxKey Healthcare Blogs: Howard J. Luks, MD---http://www.howardluksmd.com/, publishes evidence-based info, believes physicians have moral obligation to fill Goole’s servers w/ quality content. Wendy Sue Swanson, Pediatrician Seattle, @seattlemamadoc, prolific on twitterMike Sevilla, @drmikesevilla (blogs at Family Medicine Rocks)Kevin Pho, MD, leading physician bloggerDoctors Active in Social MediaBryan Vartabedian, MD Mark Ryan, MDWendy Sue Swanson, MD, FAAPHoward Luks, MDMatt Katz, MD VesDimov, MDRead more: http://ebennett.org/#ixzz2RCew7ajWBlogging smart b/c long form is uniquely suited to healthcare, consider blogging to explain answers to questions you answer over and over again. Also Google loves blogs, don’t worry about small # of subscribers, PATIENTS BLOG, e.g., Dave deBronkart @ePatientDave, started blog after having beaten cancer, started talking about medical records (2009)---12 days later blog was on front page of newspaper. Amy Tenderich, DiabetesMine, Kelly Young, RAWarrior.com (RA)YouTube main points:Online video reaches 85% of the US Internet population. It is the most consumed content format onlineThe number of videos watched online has increased by 800% in the last 6 yearsWe are in customer-centric ecosystem nowhttp://www.socialnomics.net/2012/11/07/social-media-video-2013/Facebook - http://newsroom.fb.com/download-media/4227Twitter - https://business.twitter.com/basics/what-is-twitter/; https://twitter.com/ladygagaLinkedIn - http://press.linkedin.com/aboutIM: http://www.radicati.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/email-stats-report-exec-summary.pdfEvery Minute of the day: http://www.domo.com/social/
  • There is a rapid pace of change in how we use the internet and social media to connect and consume information.Millennials ~ beginning birth years from the early 1980s to the early 2000s. (if born 1980, 33 now)It’s important to note there are many influential groups that can influence the market:Millennials use social media regularly and expect companies they engage with to be in social; they’re not only consumers, but they’ll be half the workforce by 2020, which means companies must use social to reach themHispanics are a growing segment, but this indicates a need to not only connect with them but to consider language barriers in reaching themOlder adults shouldn’t be underestimated; they’re still a large consumer group and are becoming more and more active in socialNo matter the various stakeholder group, the method of consumption of information is also evolving. Mobility and being nimble in this space is becoming increasingly important; these are a few stats to show why61% of people have a better opinion of brands when offered a good mobile experience. Over 818M people are accessing internet via a mobile phone, which is more than a 60% increase in the last two years. (GlobalWebIndex, January 2013)
  • It didn’t happen overnight for Dell; it’s taken several years to get where we’re at today.We’ve learned many lessons along the way and know the things to do and the things to avoid.We believe in the Crawl, Walk, Run approach.Find an area that needs attention and prove it out, then use that as leverage to build a business case and gain executive advocacy, resources and support. Our teams have been exchanging information with customers online since the late 1980s with listservs, and by 1996 we had our own Dell Community forums at Dell.com (other examples include: early leadership of e-commerce, the Web infrastructure to drive our supply chain, Premier Pages, etc)Today, we see social media as tool to be used across the fabric/functions of our businesses to build better business and be more connected with customers (i.e. the social web is not just about marketing or a customer support channel, rather it is a tool to be used to collaborate, connect and constantly do more with customers, from quality, to innovation, to building better business processes, to connecting and sharing real time, as well as solving technical or customer care issues) As of Sept 2012, 10k employees trainedHighlights to pick out:Started with technical support (Customer service delivery)Just over 7 years ago became an early adopter using social media to connect with customers and build a better business.  In March 2006 we established the Online Community Outreach team, a group of tech support experts that reached out to bloggers around the world who had questions or required assistance. Later that year we expanded blog outreach beyond tech support to include any conversations about Dell.  2006 was also the year we launched our blog, Direct2Dell.Moved into communications – using as a channel to tell our story – Direct to DellDeveloped into crowd sourced product and service development with IdeaStormGone multi-lingual – multi-platforms – from our own .com/blog out to those customers select for themselves – no good just listening to the conversations in English, in your own frontroom - got to get out into the street to hear what customers really thinkInternal and external – agent for collaboration and innovation within the organisation e.g. Employee Storm; ChatterDirect sales (or facilitation) channel – lot made of our sales on platforms like twitter with @delloutlet but also important to realise that buying behaviours for products and services are also now heavily influenced by the social web – the opinions of trusted friends often first port of call (social web friends; bloggers)…so bringing those views into the buying process is impactful – so dell.com brings reviews/ratings front and centre with customersPower of advocates/ambassadors not to be underestimated – your team members are powerful voices for your brand/products and services… SMaC training and open access to all the tools they need at work to both LISTEN and ENGAGERight now, we have multiple SM support teams:Social Outreach Services: sos@dell.com---------------------------------------------provides 24/7 global customer support to individs in sev languagesSocial Media Ground Control: social_media_ground_control@dell.com--------team managers listening operations and serves as early response team for systemic issues. Note: Google+Dell team members from around the around the world are early adopters and users of social media, most recently on Google+ and Pinterest.Dell’s 5 SM Principles:Protect InfoBe transparent and disclose associationsFollow the law, follow the codeBe responsibleBe nice, have fun, connect
  • There are now approx. 25,000 mentions (in English) about Dell in social conversations every day. Dell didn’t need a team, it needed an army. Further Talking PointsDell’s Social Media Listening Command Center in Round Rock, Texas (USA) was build in December 2010.Data is gathered from those conversations, including things like influencers, geography, reach, sentiment, subject matter of the discussions, channels being used, word clouds/hash tags, etc.The 4th pillar of Dell’s strategy is about listening, customer connectivity and being centered. We have over 180 different search profiles that help us parcel up those 25k conversations and make sense of the volume of discussions related to Dell. As you know, we stood up our Listening Command Center December 2010, 11 languages For those interested in a little more detail, yes… those 180 profiles include things like geography, reach, sentiment, subject matter of the discussions, where they are taking place on the web… and moreSMLCC/Ground Control Team StatsMeasures, monitors and reports on more than 25K conversations a dayAlerts team members of systemic issues and contain negative conversationsProvides access to listening tools/training and onboardingSupports local language tool set-up and listening reportsEnsures compliance with Dell brand standards and governance guidelinesAssists BUs, as needed; however, teams are expected to manage their own listening programsWhat Dell saw:18k new customer ideas183% increase in traffic to dell.com69% y/y sales increase via SM98% 1st time resolution rate on ~ 4k issues/weekDell saw 34% conversation rate from “ranters” to “ravers” b/c of @DellCares and @DellCaresPROSocial Outreach Services: sos@dell.com, provides global 24/7 cust support in multiple languagesSocial Media Ground Control: social_media_ground_control@dell.com, manages listening operations and serves as early response 4 systemic issuesHave specific handles/dedicated areas 4 customer support: @dellcares on Twitter, www.facebook.com/dell and use support tab, Additional Talking PointsDell’s strategy is to embed social into the fabric of the business and take the approach of Listen first, Engage, then Act. Dell believes EVERYONE should listen, certified team members should engage, SMEs should act, e.g., building a targeted community, or adding to credibility by using blogs to establish thought leadership---this is about providing value to our customers. Given all the functions/implications/value for business units, Dell empowers employees to engage on our behalf.Each BU determines their own social initiatives, but they must be in compliance with Dell’s established policy/governance.To teach this and to feel confident in their social activity, the Social Media and Community University (SMaC U) was established in 2010.Certifying all is not our goal, rather we want to certify the right people—the SMEs that can be conduits of content; much more impactful and effectiveThe 1st principles class enables access to our listening tools, which they can use for purposes/focuses they deem important.Completion of principles plus 2 other foundational and 1 platform-based course, such as Twitter or Facebook (4 courses total), “certifies” an employee and allows them to engage on Dell’s behalf.They MUST be transparent, authentic and respond only to areas where they have expertise.
  • Southcoast Health System — Aug 2009 When more than 50 people had to go to hospitals for treatment following a chemical fume exposure at a trash disposal station, Southcoast Hospital turned its Twitter account into a "crisis communication portal," sharing status updates for more than a week. Updates included status on admitted, discharged, and treated patients during the spill, and helpful information and links that kept the public and concerned loved ones constantly updated during the situation.Ed Bennett manages Web operations at the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC), and has more than 15 years experience working on the Web. He blogs regularly at Found In Cache, and he sits on the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media’s advisory board as well as the A.D.A.M Health Solutions’ client advisory board. He is also an advisor of TPR Media and UbiCare.Prior to assuming these roles, Bennett was a programmer, designer, consultant, information architect and start-up participant. His current focus is on the use of social media within the healthcare industry. Bennett is also active in the Health Care Social Media Community (#HCSM).Code TwitterSouthcoast Hospital:Several employees were exposed to chemical fumes at a trash disposal station. The incident left two employees unconsciousness and in critical condition. More than 50 people were sent to local hospitals for treatment.Statement on condition of victims from New Bedford haz-mat situation … 1 p.m. update… http://bit.ly/163jaA10:20 AM Aug 3rdfrom TweetieIf you distribute crisis communications for an organization, information is usually provided by phone or press release. Today many local media outlets are using Twitter to gather news stories and facts. Twitter offers an additional way for organizations to control the delivery of information and resources.For more than a week in August, Southcoast Hospital used Twitter as a crisis communication portal. During the crisis Southcoast tweeted daily status updates on the patients admitted, discharged and/or treated during the hazardous materials spill in the area.(7)Final update on condition of victims from New Bedford haz-mat situation … last patient released today…http://bit.ly/IWDn66:38 PM Aug 12thfrom TweetieTweets also contained information and links to phone numbers and other important hospital information. From the 100 tweets analyzed more that 50% contained hashtags, links to media releases, news coverage and the hospitals website.Southcoast Hospital is using Twitter in innovative ways, delivering timed information to multiple audiences.Ft. Hood, Scott & White Shooting: Shootings by Nidal Hassan, 13 people fatally shot, and more than 30 more injuredThis was followed by a continuous string of updates that included information on Emergency Room access, Hospital operation status, re-tweets from the Red Cross, dialog with local reporters and other resources for visitors.  In addition to Twitter, Scott and White used a Blog and YouTube to keep everyone informed.Q: The Scott & White social media presence is fairly new – first blog post on 9/11, first Tweet on August 21, but your use of these tools during the Fort Hood crisis was excellent, a textbook case. Did you have a crisis plan in place?Steven Widmann: While we do have a system-wide crisis plan in place we have not integrated our social media use into it just yet.  It was only recently that we received approval from leadership to utilize social media within our marketing department.  We’ve been discussing implementing social media for over a year now, but had received a lot of push-back.  Fortunately members of my team have been very active in promoting the use social media and have been meeting with our PR department for many months while we were working on getting approval.  We plan to formalize a written plan soon once we complete an internal debriefing.What was the response from local media and/or general public to your social media updates?We received a lot of support and gratitude from the local media and the general public.  We believe, as others do, that the web will ultimately become a ‘source of truth’ to receive current updates and information during a crisis.Did you see an increase in Twitter followers, views on YouTube and/or traffic to your Blog?Twitter followers increased 78% in three days.  Our hospital was also listed on the front page of Twitter as a ‘trending topic’.   Our YouTube channel ranked 79′th most viewed non-profit channel for the week.Can you describe the process for posting updates during a crisis?The process was the same as it would be for traditional media. Our Director of PR was in our command center with other crisis team members.  When information needed to be updated, web team members received either an email or phone call from the command center and an update was immediately made, typically with a tweet followed by detailed information on our homepage. We also time and date stamped all of our updates so a user would know how current the post was.What has been the reaction from your executive office to this experience?They have been very pleased with the response of all staff members involved in working on this tragedy.  No one department has been singled out as it truly was a team effort.  My hope is to provide a short presentation to leadership in the next 30 days to fully highlight the marketing department’s effort and specifically our use of social media.  As I mentioned before there has been a lot of push-back on using social media in the past.  I believe most of it was because leadership was not familiar with it and how it can benefit our hospital in communications with the community. I believe the proof is in the pudding now.What would you do differently next time?We’ve been discussing this over the past week.  First  we believe we need to have a written plan.  Second I’m asking that Web Services becomes part of the Crisis team and participate in the drills each year.  One item that was brought up by the PR team was that during drills, they did not actually use their equipment as they would during a crisis.  During the Fort Hood incident they found that they had limited connectivity in the command center.  This included a wireless internet connection and bad cell phone reception. If this had been tested during the drills they would not have run into this problem during a real crisis.  It slowed thing down a little.We also found that the Web Services team really needs to have an additional person in the command center to be able to relay information to the web team for updates.  The PR staff is extremely busy and is unable to respond quickly to email or phone requests.  Having a person who is connected to the Web Team in the command center would have really helped.We have also been looking at using a tool like Yammer for internal communications too. We were testing it early in the year but ran into some issues and concerns by Legal.  I believe they are legitimate concerns, but we need to educate our people better to alleviate these concerns.  With this recent event I believe we can get a lot more buy-in since internal communications would be better served with a tool like Yammer.Final thoughts…I’m finding the use of social media is really no different than what crisis communications have been in years past.  Only the tools have changed.  With social media tools we have the capability to get information out quicker and to a larger audience.  Ultimately it’s all about communication.  Having social media tools and understanding how they work will allow hospitals to create that ‘source of truth’ that will better serve the community. Unlike some others, I believe there is a difference in using social media  between businesses and healthcare organizations. Because of the HIPAA laws we have to be a lot more careful on the information we release so we don’t infringe on our patient’s privacy.  Only healthcare organizations have this type of limitation.As long as hospitals already have a good crisis communication plan in place there is no reason why they need to reinvent the wheel and do anything different when using social media other than having the resources to make the updates.  Having a great staff who understands how the tool works also makes a big difference.  No doubt the technology will continue to change and improve down the road.  Keeping up with  technology is paramount in using the tools when needed.   What won’t change is having a good crisis communication plan in place that is able to utilize the tools when needed.Read more: http://ebennett.org/scott-white-fort-hood/#ixzz2mQgjWfHx
  • Before the storm even hit the New York and New Jersey coastal areas, preparedness messages were being sent out via various social media platforms. During the response phase of the storm, social media was used as a key communication channel. Key first pieces of information through social media included:emergency shelter information, locating or reuniting peoplefood and water distribution details safety tipswhere to receive medical attention areas to stay away fromOne of the down sides to social media, however, is its ability to spread rumors at an alarming rate, possibly to millions of people at once. For this reason, all of the organizations involved had to constantly monitor social media to locate and immediately address any rumors, inconsistencies and misinformation. FEMA actually had a web page solely dedicated to Hurricane Sandy rumor control, and also sent out regular tweets correcting any misinformation and addressing rumors.Providers need to create well-worn pathways in order to make it much easier for the Provider to publish timely content and use SM in the most effective ways during a possible emergency or disaster. Creating these well-worn pathways ahead of any potential disaster will also make it easier on community members because they will be able to access this important information more quickly and more easily.While Hurricane Sandy the affected areas are still in the recovery phase, and social media platforms continue to be used to spread information and updates. In particular, Facebook and Twitter continue to coordinate volunteer relief efforts in the New York and New Jersey areas. New York Cares, Movement for Peace and Occupy Sandy are just a few of the organizations who have been instrumental in finding and assigning volunteers, primarily through social media.http://www.wcdm.org/blog/hurricane-sandy-lessons-learned-a-social-media-success-story.html- See more at: http://www.wcdm.org/blog/hurricane-sandy-lessons-learned-a-social-media-success-story.html#sthash.OWP9qxZx.dpufHurricane in Philippines — 2012From my blog: Disaster Timeline:October 2012: Sandy wreaked havoc across Northeast and killed more than 100 people. December 2011: Tropical storm Washi kills more than 1500 in the Philippines. Summer 2011: Droughts plagued parts of Texas and Oklahoma and killed nearly 30,000 children in Africa.March 2011: An 8.9 magnitude earthquake hit Japan and the resulting tsunami claimed more than 15,000 lives.Campus Shootings
  • Part of why consumers expect to interact in SM is other industries set that expectation---JJ LOOK UP DATA, one tidbit: 41% of consumers said social media would affect their choice of a specific doctor, hospital or medical facilityIf you’re already engaged in SM, great, if you are in the places your target audience(s) are, great. You still might not know exactly what the data means or what to do w/it---you can get there. Mining SM data will help understand when audience is most active, what platforms most active on, what topics seem to be most interested in, will inform other aspects of anyone’s business, e.g., limitations, mistakes, things you are doing well, etc. KP example of parking issue----http://sloanreview.mit.edu/article/kaiser-permanente-using-social-tools-to-improve-customer-service-research-and-internal-collaboration/How have you used social media as a customer service research tool?An executive in our organization came to me several months ago with a theory, based on personal experience, that he did not think that we were doing the best job in the world at parking for our members. He had this idea that we as an organization were not spending enough attention on how we construct, organize and orient parking spaces around our facilities so that it is easy and convenient for our members.He basically asked us if there was information in the social media space that would either help him prove or disprove that theory. So what we did was measure Twitter over the course of 30 days, specifically searching Twitter for references for our organization and parking.It wasn’t a completely easy thing to do. For example, with our name, Kaiser Permanente, everybody in the social media universe uses the shorthand “Kaiser.” That means that our search would also turn up Kaiser beer, Kaiser roll, etc.If you describe a bell curve of conversation where one end is very positive and one end is very negative, generally what we see is that 60%, 70%, 75% of the conversation is pretty much right in the middle, neutral. Tweets like, “I am at this location” or “I’m going to Kaiser to get my flu shot.” Then, on the ends, ideally you have more positive than negative, and more very positive than very negative.In analyzing 30 days of parking-related tweets, what we saw on that bell curve was that the negative was at a level of about twice the negative as the general bell curve. We were able to show this executive that he was right: that indeed, the conversations about parking with our organization at that moment were twice as negative as general conversation about our brand. We were able to pick out specific things that people were talking about, like valet parking. Many of our facilities had introduced that, and it was generally greeted very positively, but there were significant negative tweets about it, about why in the world would somebody have valet parking at a medical center, and whether it was a wise use of funding.Now, whether to have valet parking is an individual, facility-by-facility response, and our general point of view is that anything that we can do to make access to our care easy and convenient is the right thing to do. But, more to the point, we were able to use social media research to show this executive that indeed there were conversations happening about our brand specific to parking, and that they were more negative than just general conversations. That was information he was able to then use to continue conversations at his level.
  • Part of why consumers expect to interact in SM is other industries set that expectation---JJ LOOK UP DATA, one tidbit: 41% of consumers said social media would affect their choice of a specific doctor, hospital or medical facilityAltimeter report: http://socialmediatoday.com/briansolis/1849101/altimeter-group-s-state-social-business-2013-report The 5 Common Methods of Organizing Social MediaDecentralized – No one department manages or coordinates; efforts bubble up from the edges of the company. Centralized – One department (like Corp Communications) manages all social activities. Hub and Spoke - A cross-functional team sits in a centralized position and helps various nodes such as business units. Multiple Hub and Spoke (“Dandelion”) – Similar to Hub and Spoke but applicable to multinational companies where “companies within companies” act nearly autonomously from each other under a common brand. Holistic – Everyone in the company uses social media safely and consistently across all organizations. Dell has 3 Mandatory classes---SMaC Principles, Get Started SMaCing, Building Brand on SMaC, then 1 platform of choice class for SMaC certification (which allows you to engage in SM on behalf of Dell)
  • Part of why consumers expect to interact in SM is other industries set that expectation---JJ LOOK UP DATA, one tidbit: 41% of consumers said social media would affect their choice of a specific doctor, hospital or medical facilityJJ 2 Audience: How big are your Social teams?Altimeter report: http://socialmediatoday.com/briansolis/1849101/altimeter-group-s-state-social-business-2013-report The 5 Common Methods of Organizing Social MediaDecentralized – No one department manages or coordinates; efforts bubble up from the edges of the company. Centralized – One department (like Corp Communications) manages all social activities. Hub and Spoke - A cross-functional team sits in a centralized position and helps various nodes such as business units. Multiple Hub and Spoke (“Dandelion”) – Similar to Hub and Spoke but applicable to multinational companies where “companies within companies” act nearly autonomously from each other under a common brand. Holistic – Everyone in the company uses social media safely and consistently across all organizations. Dell has 3 Mandatory classes---SMaC Principles, Get Started SMaCing, Building Brand on SMaC, then 1 platform of choice class for SMaC certification (which allows you to engage in SM on behalf of Dell)Jeremiah Owyang, an industry analyst at Altimeter Group, a digital strategy consulting firm has these sm strategist tips:Be Proactive, Not ReactiveBe a Program Manager, Not EvangelistEducate Your Business UnitsOrganize for SuccessBe an EnablerDeploy Scalable Social Media ProgramsTranscend Marketing
  • We would’ve already discussed some Disaster related SM uses, but a few tactical tips re Twitter here.When news breaks about a weather or safety emergency, government agencies and emergency responders jump into action on the ground and on Twitter, delivering critical and timely information and engaging with constituents. We saw this following Superstorm Sandy, the tsunami in Japan, and the manhunt in Boston.Most disaster tweets, though they may be cathartic or thoughtful, aren’t exactly useful. But many of them are. One study of 64,000 disaster tweets from the Thailand’s 2011 floods, the fourth costliest natural disaster in history, according to World Bank estimates, found that 39 percent of them contained valuable location-based information and alerts.Also, can mention unexpected use of Twitter, e.g. Oreo ad~ 1M per 30 second ad for SBOreo ad:Reaction left some wondering whether the quick tweet had an even greater payoff than Oreo's actual Super Bowl ad, which cost millions more to create. AdAge reported that the graphic released during the blackout was "designed, captioned and approved within minutes," thanks to members of 360i — the cookie company's agency — gathered at a war room during the game.HCLS companies must better understand and leverage:Real-time Listening Real-time Engagement(ideally, via Social Media Command Centers)
  • We would’ve already discussed some Disaster related SM uses, but a few tactical tips re Google here. Of course, Google Crisis Response is not exactly a Social Media Platform, however, obviously Google is a technological powerhouse and Google has tools specific to Crisis and Disaster situations. JJ 2 Audience: Who is familiar w/Google Crisis Response?Person Finder is a popup type site, Person Finder has 2 choices, I am looking for info on someone or I have info about someone. Google Crisis Response was launched in Jan 2010 after the Haitian Earthquake Since Haiti, the Google Crisis Response team has responded to 25 more disasters. When Japan was ripped up in 2011 by the biggest earthquake in its history, Person Finder was live within 90 minutes. The tool compiled more than 600,000 names and received 36 million page views in the first two days, according to Shona Brown, senior vice president of Google.org, the company's philanthropic arm, in 2011 congressional testimony. Normally, that kind of volume would crash a website without the infrastructure of an entity like Google.The Internet has increasingly become a critical part of response efforts, in no small part because it’s often still running when phone lines are down and cell phone towers are overwhelmed. After the Boston Marathon bombing this spring, Kelly Manning told Search Engine Journal that she tried calling her daughter for half an hour, without any luck. Then, she hopped on Person Finder, and located her immediately.Still, Brown said that Google's work in emergency relief is modest, saying that the Crisis Response team doesn't claim to be an expert in crisis response. “We are computer scientists and developers," she said, "and Google.org is a newcomer to this space."The Google Crisis Map is regularly updated by people on the ground with information on evacuation centers, relief drop zone areas, road washouts and infrastructure damage, so residents and relief workers can better navigate crisis terrain.There are other Google Crisis Services---such as Google Maps Engine Lite and Google Earth:Google Maps Engine Lite:Using Google Maps Engine, responders can easily create custom Google maps when they need to supply critical crisis information to their teams or to the public. Mark crisis information such as road closures and resources such as emergency medical stationsDraw lines and shapes to highlight paths and areas that are covered in debrisSet map permissions to control sharing -- publicly, or privately within your network.Import CSV, e.g. from a spreadsheet, to host on Google’s servers and customizeGoogle Earth:Google Earth is a virtual globe and geographical information platform. See the places you are working in or traveling to in great geographic detail. Customize Google Earth with editing tools to draw shapes, add text, and integrate live feeds of information as they happen. Compare pre- and post-disaster images of an affected locationExplore the places you are working through the many information layers built into Google Earth,Add markers and customize them with text, photos, and videoshttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hCvbNAD8tfc--Google Tech Talk in NYC, Oct 2013http://www.google.org/crisisresponse/howwerespond.htmlhttp://www.google.org/crisisresponse/resources.htmlhttp://america.aljazeera.com/watch/shows/america-tonight/america-tonight-blog/2013/11/25/google-crisis-responsehaiyan.htmlhttp://irevolution.net/2011/07/03/google-humanitarian-technology/
  • We would’ve already discussed some Disaster related SM uses, but a few tactical tips re Google+ here.JJ 2 Audience: Who is using G+? How are they using it?
  • We would’ve already discussed some Disaster related SM uses, but a few tactical tips re YouTube here.When news breaks about a weather or safety emergency, government agencies and emergency responders jump into action on the ground and on YTYouTube also has dozens of videos which are tributes or fundraisers for various crisis, e.g. for Hurricane Haiyan Following Sandy, Throughout the event, NYC.gov did a remarkable job getting messaging out in as many ways possible, including through social media. For example, all of Mayor Bloomberg’s press conferences were live-tweeted (in both English and Spanish!) by @nycmayorsoffice, and were also posted on Youtube immediately afterwards. A summary of each press conference was also posted to Facebook and Tumblr. Since Hurricane Sandy, the Mayor’s press conferences have received over one million views on Youtube, and the city of New York has gained over 180,000 new social media followers. - See more at: http://www.wcdm.org/blog/hurricane-sandy-lessons-learned-a-social-media-success-story.html#sthash.OWP9qxZx.dpufhttp://www.wcdm.org/blog/hurricane-sandy-lessons-learned-a-social-media-success-story.htmlYouTube main points:Online video reaches 85% of the US Internet population. It is the most consumed content format onlineThe number of videos watched online has increased by 800% in the last 6 yearsYouTube has 153 million unique viewers, that’s almost 100 million more than FacebookYouTube own 48% of the share of content (video views), The second platform is AOL with only 2%Men and women are equally likely to watch videos online
  • Transcript

    • 1. How Social Media is Shaping Disaster Response Janice Jacobs HCLS Social Media Director
    • 2. Key Considerations & Preparations Introduction Internet & Social Media Overview Platform Specific Examples & Tips Dell’s Social Media Journey Disasters & Disaster Response Q&A / Discussion Today’s Agenda
    • 3. Internet & Social Media Overview
    • 4. The Internet 2000 • 46% of adults use internet • 5% with broadband at home • 0% connect to internet wirelessly • <10% use “cloud” = slow, stationary connections built around my computer 2013 • 85% of adults use internet • 70% with broadband at home • 91% own a cell phone • 63% connect to internet wirelessly • > two-thirds (2/3) use “cloud”= fast, mobile connections built around outside servers and storage 4 Source: PEW Internet Reports The rapid pace of change is changing the game. then… & now
    • 5. Social Media is Changing the World 5 Sources: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, www.domo.com/social, www.radicati.com 1B Users on Facebook 34,722 every minute of the day “likes” for brands on Facebook 600M Facebook users accessing via mobile 465M+ Twitter accounts 560M+ active Twitter users 100K every minute of the day tweets sent by users 3.7B Worldwide IM accounts 48 hrs every minute of the day new video uploaded to YouTube 2 new members per second on LinkedIn 2M every minute of the day Google search inquiries 187M+ Professionals on LinkedIn 3,600 every minute of the day New photos shared via Instagram simple Definition: “We don’t have a choice on whether we DO social media, the question is HOW WELL WE DO IT.” – Erik Qualman Socialnomics.net “Social media” means websites (or web-based interactions) which allow average users to create content and interact with each other around the content. If Facebook were a country, it would be the world’s 3rd largest.
    • 6. The Market Has Many Influences Millennials (teens and “twenty- somethings”) 94% are Internet users and 83% have smartphones (Pew Internet & American Life Project/2013 Millennial Impact Report) 80% in the U.S. use social media, making them the most active in social media (Pew Internet & American Life Project, August 2013) 75% Like, Retweet or Share content on social media (2013 Millennial Impact Report) 45% of fluent speakers feel there aren’t enough Spanish-language apps AdAge Survey, August 2013) 46% of the workforce will be millennials by 2020 (UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School “Maximizing Millennials” Report, June 2013 25% are more likely to follow a brand than the average U.S. adult online (Nielsen 2012 “State of the Hispanic Consumer” Report) Hispanic adults Older adults 3x as many 65+ have a social networking site presence over the last four years (Pew Internet & American Life Project, August 2013) Top online activities for 60+ are Google, Facebook, Yahoo and YouTube (AARP 2012) 79% Is the increase in active 55+ Twitter users, making them the fastest growing age demographic for this site (GlobalWebIndex, January 2013 6
    • 7. Dell’s Social Media Journey
    • 8. Dell’s History of Social Media Experience August 2006 Blog outreach expanded beyond tech Support March 2008 Accepted Solutions launched on Community Dell France begins online community outreach December 2006 Ratings and reviews launched on Dell.com July 2006 Direct2Dell launched Today Direct2Dell exists in English, Spanish, Norwegian, Ja panese and Chinese. February 2006 Michael Dell asks Why don’t we reach out and help bloggers with tech support issues? February 2007 IdeaStorm launched A voting-based site allowing customers and others to submit ideas for Dell June 2007 Dell joins Twitter Sells millions in the first year October 2007 Community VIP program launched Dell launches recognition program for our most active community members, with private groups and escalated access June 2006 Dell TechCenter launched March 2010 Dell joins Sina Weibo in China March 2012 Dell and Red Cross launch Digital Operations Center Dell solutions provide the Red Cross with innovative ways to help Americans impacted by disaster August 2010 Social Media & Community University (SMaC U) launched 5,000 team members trained by end of year June 2010 CAP Days launched In-person events for vocal online customers December 2010 Social Media Listening Command Center launched June 2007 EmployeeStorm launched IdeaStorm for employees August 2009 Swarm Canada launches Group buying program goes live in Canada May 2009 Swarm launches Group buying program goes live, in Singapore Feb 2009 Social Innovation Competition Built on IdeaStorm rewarding global social innovation July 2011 Michael Dell joins Google+ Jumps to #50 in followers, holds first Dell Hangout July 2010 Michael Dell on Dell Chatter Rolls out company wide July 2011 Dell launches global G+ site Feb 2012 Dell joins Pinterest October 2012 Dell launches Subject Matter Expert social media program January 2013 Dell Launches Social Net Advocacy Real-time social sentiment tool December 2012 Dell launches Social Media Services Group January 2011 Think Tank program launched October 2011 Dell launches phase two of VIP program Brings enhanced advocacy relationship to our most passionate community members October 2009 Dell joins Renren September 2008 Dell launches Yammer First enterprise social network October 2009 SMaC organization launched Cross-functional central organization January 2010 Social Outreach Services team formed @DellCares launched three months later 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 20132012 8
    • 9. Social Media Command Centers Provide: + an alternate channel of market intelligence and real-time engagement with social media users + a centralized point for monitoring of social media listening operations across the organization + the ability to enable conversion into a crisis communications hub and central point for public relations risk mitigation + social media analytics, data and measurement of social media engagement effectiveness Social Media Command Centers 9 Dell started listening From 4,000 to 25,000 mentions per day Dell Command Center Dell launched our Social Media Listening Command Center in 2010 across 11 languages
    • 10. Disasters & Disaster Response
    • 11. Disasters and Social Media Use Provider Thought Leadership: 1. Southcoast Health System — Aug 2009 When more than 50 people had to go to hospitals for treatment following a chemical fume exposure at a trash disposal station, Southcoast Hospital turned its Twitter account into a "crisis communication portal," sharing status updates for more than a week. 2. Scott & White Ft. Hood Shooting — Nov 2009 Scott and White was one of the hospitals which provided services to Fort Hood, and on that day 10 victims of the shooting attack were sent to their Emergency Department. Social Media sites for the hospital had recently been set up, and now they needed every available communications tool. Before the first shooting victim arrived, they posted this update to the Scott and White Twitter account: Read more: http://ebennett.org/scott-white-fort-hood/#ixzz2l88mK2It “If you want to connect with people and be part of their community, you need to go where the community is. You need to be connecting before you are actually needed,” explained Ed Bennett, who oversees social media efforts at the University of Maryland Medical Center. 11
    • 12. Natural Disaster Example: Hurricane Sandy — Oct 2012 • Throughout the storm, NYC.gov, Facebook, Flikr, Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram and YouTube informed people in almost real-time. • Regular tweets from FEMA, Red Cross, NYC’s Office of Emergency Management, National Guard and Mayor Bloomberg’s office kept citizens informed on how to prepare for the storm, when and where to evacuate, where water, food and shelter could be found. • Regular hurricane updates and tracking information, tips on how to prepare in advance, evacuation orders and emergency evacuation route information were pushed out through every social media platform. Throughout the storm, NYC.gov got messaging out via: • All of Mayor Bloomberg’s press conferences were live-tweeted (in English & Spanish) • Conferences also posted on YouTube afterwards. • Summaries of each press conference also posted to Facebook and Tumblr. • Since Sandy, the Mayor’s press conferences have received over one million (1M) views on Youtube • City of New York has gained over 180,000 new social media followers. Disasters and Social Media Use (cont.) New Followers > 180,000 12 “If you want to connect with people and be part of their community, you need to go where the community is. You need to be connecting before you are actually needed,” explained Ed Bennett, who oversees social media efforts at the University of Maryland Medical Center.
    • 13. 13 Case study: American Red Cross Challenge The American Red Cross has been a leader in the social media space for some time, but looked to Dell for help scaling their social media operations during major disasters. As an organization with worldwide exposure and such a direct impact on human life, they needed a scaling solution that would support their efforts Approach Video This is the first social media command center devoted to humanitarian relief and demonstrates the power social media can lend during emergency and crisis situations. The DigiDoc Command Center enabled the American Red Cross to “listen” to more than 542,947 social conversations during Hurricane Sandy. Benefits Dell was brought in to construct the project — modeling it after their own Social Media Listening Command Center, used to track brand sentiment and chatter. We consulted on the space configuration, build and helped the American Red Cross establish processes for the successful training and operation of their command center. • Improved data sourcing and identification of trends in disaster-affected areas • Improved ability to anticipate and respond to the public’s needs • Increased ability to quickly connect people with the resources they need during a disaster — such as food, water, shelter or even emotional support. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =w8nL9WO2m0Y
    • 14. Key Considerations & Preparations
    • 15. 15 • We have observed “three main mistakes” that companies make when trying to use social platforms: 1 Key Considerations Biggest error is not getting started Social media engagement is an imperative: if you’re not in these conversations they’re happening without you. 2 Businesses need to engage with their target audience in the social places those users are. Don’t have a “if you build it, they will come” attitude. 3 Many businesses don’t understand and utilize the richness of the analytics and the customer data a business can get by mining social media sites.
    • 16. 16 Are You Prepared to Act? Key activities which must be undertaken in order to engage with audience(s). At a minimum: • Social Media Policy • Social Media Governance Structure • Trained People who are Able to Act on Organization’s Behalf • Clear Escalation Points for Social Media Source: Altimeter Group, 2013 Organize for Success
    • 17. 17 Are You Prepared to Act? (cont.) Engaging in Social Media Requires: Staff commitment is changing for most organizations Source: Altimeter Group, 2013 Transcending marketingTrained / empowered people
    • 18. Platform Specific Examples / Tips
    • 19. How alerts work Who can participate When to use them Platform Specific: Twitter Twitter Alerts appear on subscribers’ phones as push and/or SMS notifications when authoritative accounts mark Tweets as alerts. Alerts appear differently on users’ timelines -- indicated with an orange bell. Twitter Alerts, unveiled Sept 2013 – enhance visibility of critical Tweets Alerts – when to use them Participating organizations can determine when to use, however the feature is intended for crisis, disaster and emergency communications, such as: • warnings for imminent dangers • preventive instructions • evacuation directions • urgent safety alerts • information on critical transit and utility outages • crowd & misinformation management Alerts – who can participate Available to local, national and international institutions that provide critical information to the public. Priority access to alerts: • law enforcement & public safety agencies; • emergency management agencies; • city & municipal governments, • county & regional agencies, • providing services to cities & municipalities • & select state, federal, & national agencies and NGOs. To enroll, complete Twitter’s enrollment form. Retweets: > 15,000 19
    • 20. Platform Specific: Google Crisis Response Google Public Alerts: Google’s platform to spread relevant emergency alerts to users searching. There are steps to take before an emergency happens to make sure the alerts are working properly: • Get your alerts in Common Alerting Protocol • Validate your feeds are set up right • Subscribe your alerts to Google Alert Hub Google Person Finder: Helps separated people locate one another by providing an open platform for individuals and organizations to let people know who they’re looking for, and to enter updates about missing persons. Organizations can: • Embed Google Person Finder in website(s) to allow people to directly access and use the tool • Download data from Google Person Finder to match with your information or take to the field • Upload data you’ve collected into Google Person Finder Google Crisis Map: A mashup tool that puts critical disaster-related geographic data in context, and in a map-based viewing frame optimized for usability across browsers and mobile devices. With Crisis Map: • Explore disaster-related geographic data without any special software or GIS expertise • Embed a Google Crisis Map on your website • Share a crisis map with co-workers, media outlets, and partners • Contribute data to be included on a crisis map Source: http://www.google.org/crisisresponse/resources.html20
    • 21. Platform Specific: Google+ Google + Differentiators: • G+ is open and searchable vs. Facebook’s walled garden • Openness and search ability ought to make it easier to find information on G+. This will allow for more serendipity and synergies. • Google+’s new Hangout feature could also be used instead of Skype chat and video, with the advantage of having multi-person video-conferencing. • With a little more work, the Sparks feature could facilitate media monitoring—an important component of live crisis mapping. • Google+ mobile, which is accessible on most phones with a browser and already includes a “check-in” feature as well as geo-referenced status updates. • There are native apps for Android and the iPhone. 21
    • 22. Platform Specific: YouTube YouTube Stats: • 800 million monthly unique visitors (Try naming websites with that kind of traffic) • Number of videos watched online has increased by 800% in the last 6 years • Has 153 million unique viewers, that’s almost 100 million more than Facebook • YouTube owns 48% of the share of content (video views), The second platform is AOL with only 2% • Men and women are equally likely to watch videos online #2 Largest Search Engine in the world---bigger than Bing, Yahoo, Ask and AOL combined Hurricane Sandy, Oct 2012: Throughout Hurricane Sandy, YouTube was heavily utilized: • all of Mayor Bloomberg’s press conferences were live-tweeted by @nycmayorsoffice and were also posted on YouTube immediately afterwards. • Since Hurricane Sandy, the Mayor’s press conferences have received over one million (1M) views on YouTube 22
    • 23. Q&A / Discussion Services
    • 24. Thank you For further information: Janice_Jacobs@dell.com 972-577-5847 @JaniceJacobs44 @DellHealth @DellServices

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