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Ways to Study 3 Imagination

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Ways to Study 3 Imagination Ways to Study 3 Imagination Presentation Transcript

  • Ways to Study lecture 03Imagination
  • Extending science Imaginable possible probable art design study empirical research
  • Design related study orempirical research• Research produces probabilities by causes• Design produces possibilities by conditions possible design condition futures probable prognosis cause futures probability
  • Creativity according toHerman HertzbergerA simple recipe for creativity written by architectHerman Hertzberger (1999, 2000, 2002):1. break off the cliché,2. collect many images,3. locate them in another context and4. start to adapt them.
  • Break off the cliché Robert Delaunay (1913)
  • Change context (for example museum) Marcel Duchamps (1917)
  • Combine, leave out, adapt Pablo Picasso (1942)
  • Adapt reference images
  • Model them in a composition • dividing (verdelen)* • articulating (geleden)* • tailoring (tailleren)* • detailing (detailleren)** translated from Dutch
  • Dividing, Articulating
  • Tailoring, Detailing adapting to context components and connecting details
  • Composition • marking out components, their variation and characteristic details, • connecting details between components, • crucial details in the composition, • determining striking details.
  • Scale 10m Image components and details in a radius of 10, 30 and 100 meters10m radius Image Component Detail
  • Scale 30m
  • Scale 100m
  • Varying components
  • Composition
  • Limits of scope (object and context) Scale paradox
  • Ways to study andresearchurban, architectural and technicaldesignProf.dr.ir. A.C.J.M. EekhoutProf.dr.ir. T. M. de JongDr. D.J.M. van der Voordt
  • 48 Authors from 1 facultyThere are more methods of design, study and research then thereare designers and scientists.
  • the bookVan der Voordt & Jong (2002) Ways to Study CONTENTS Introduction A.Naming and describing Empirical research B.Design research and typology C.Evaluating D.Modeling E.Programming and optimizing F.Technical Study G.Design Study H.Study by design Epilogue Study by design determined variable OBJECT determined design research design study variable typological research study by design CONTEXT
  • CONTENTS Introduction A.Naming and describingIntroduction B.Design research and typology C.Evaluating D.Modeling E.Programming and optimizing F.Technical Study G.Design Study H.Study by designPreface (Fokkema) Epilogue1. Introduction (Jong; Voordt)2. Languages (Dijkhuis)3. Criteria for scientific research, study and design (Jong, Voordt)‘Science equals any collection ofstatements that features a reliablerelationship to reality, a valid mutualrelationship and a critical potential withregard to other statements in the samedomain.’
  • Design related StudyPreface by Rector FokkemaWithin the range of a technical university theobject of design – in terms of (urban)architecture and technique – is the designsubject that is amongst all others mostsensitive to context.The program of requirements is not onlyderived from an economical and technicalcontext, but also from contexts hailing frompolitical, cultural, ecological en spatialconsiderations; on many levels of scale.
  • the bookVan der Voordt & Jong (2002) Ways to Study CONTENTS Introduction A.Naming and describing Empirical research B.Design research and typology C.Evaluating D.Modeling E.Programming and optimizing F.Technical Study G.Design Study H.Study by design Epilogue Study by design determined variable OBJECT determined design research design study variable typological research study by design CONTEXT
  • The concept of context
  • Domains according to Van der Voordt
  • Domains according to De Jong
  • the bookVan der Voordt & Jong (2002) Ways to Study CONTENTS Introduction A.Naming and describing Empirical research B.Design research and typology C.Evaluating D.Modeling E.Programming and optimizing F.Technical Study G.Design Study H.Study by design Epilogue Study by design determined variable OBJECT determined design research design study variable typological research study by design CONTEXT
  • CONTENTS Introduction A.Naming and describingA. Naming and describing B.Design research and typology C.Evaluating D.Modeling E.Programming and optimizing F.Technical Study G.Design Study H.Study by design4. Naming components and concepts (Jong; Rosemann) Epilogue5. Retrieval and reference (Jong; Voordt)6. Descriptive research (Lans; Voordt)7. Historical research (Macel)8. Map study (Moens)9. Casuistry resulting in laws (Hobma; Schutte)
  • CONTENTS Introduction A.Naming and describingB. Design research and typology B.Design research and typology C.Evaluating D.Modeling E.Programming and optimizing F.Technical Study G.Design Study H.Study by design10. Design research (Jong; Duin) Epilogue11. Designerly enquiry (Breen)12. Typological Research (Jong; Engel)13. Concept and Type (Leupen)14. Analysis of buildings (Molema)15. Plan analysis (Meyer)16. Design driven research (Breen)
  • CONTENTS Introduction A.Naming and describingC. Evaluating B.Design research and typology C.Evaluating D.Modeling E.Programming and optimizing F.Technical Study G.Design Study H.Study by design17. Ex post evaluation of buildings (Voordt; Wegen) Epilogue18. Ex ante research (Hulsbergen; Schaaf)19. Ex ante performance evaluation of housing (Thomsen)20. Evaluating prototypes21. Comparing and evaluating drawings (De Jong)
  • CONTENTS Introduction A.Naming and describingD. Modeling B.Design research and typology C.Evaluating D.Modeling E.Programming and optimizing F.Technical Study G.Design Study H.Study by design22. Modelling reality (Klaasen) Epilogue23. Verbal Models (Jong)24. Mathematical Models (Jong; Graaf)25. Visualisation and architecture (Koutamanis)26. The empirical cycle (Priemus)27. Forecasting and Problem Spotting (Jong; Priemus)
  • Example: Mathematical modelsDe Jong en De Graaf1. Origins 13. Geometry2. The mathematical model is no reality 14. Graphs3. Mathematics is a language 15. Probability4. Numbering 16. Linear Programming (LP)5. Counting 17. Matrix calculation6. Values and variables 18. The Simplex method7. Combinatorics 19. Functions8. Taming the combinatorial explosion 20. Fractals9. Program of a site 21. Differentiation10. The resolution of a medium 22. Integration11. The tolerance of production 23. Differential equations12. Nominal size systems 24. Systems modelling
  • A mathematical model
  • CONTENTS IntroductionE. Programming and optimizing A.Naming and describing B.Design research and typology C.Evaluating D.Modeling E.Programming and optimizing F.Technical Study G.Design Study H.Study by design19. Urban Programming Research (Guyt; Hulsbergen) Epilogue20. Programming of buildings (Voordt; Wegen)21. Programming Building Construction (Eekhout; Cuperus)22. Designing a city hall (Weeber; Eldijk; Kan)23. Design by optimisation (Loon)24. Optimisation of performance requirements (Houben)25. The environmental maximisation method (Duijvestein)
  • CONTENTS Introduction A.Naming and describingG. Technical Study B.Design research and typology C.Evaluating D.Modeling E.Programming and optimizing F.Technical Study G.Design Study H.Study by design35. Re-design and renovation (Verhoef) Epilogue36. Study of Building Services and Installations (Schalkoort)37. Methodical design of load-bearing constructions (Kamerling)38. Classification and combination (Cuperus)39. Methodology and component development (Eekhout)40. Industrial design methods (Jager)41. Future ICT developments (Sariyildiz; Stouffs; Ciftcioglu; Tuncer)
  • CONTENTS Introduction A.Naming and describingG. Design study B.Design research and typology C.Evaluating D.Modeling E.Programming and optimizing F.Technical Study G.Design Study H.Study by design42. Creating space of thought (Hertzberger) Epilogue43. Perceiving and conceiving (Hertzberger)44. Formation of the image (Jong; Rosemann)45. Experience, intuition and conception (Geuze; Eldijk; Kan)46. Designing an office (Brouwer; Eldijk; Kan)47. Designing a village (Heeling; Eldijk; Kan)48. Urban design methods (Westrik)49. Studying Design (Jong)There are more design methodsthan designers.
  • CONTENTS Introduction A.Naming and describingH. Study by design B.Design research and typology C.Evaluating D.Modeling E.Programming and optimizing F.Technical Study G.Design Study H.Study by design50. Types of study by design (Voordt, Jong) Epilogue51. Designing Naturalis in a changing context (Verheijen; Eldijk; Kan)52. Designing a building for art and culture (Röling; Eldijk; Kan)53. Contemplations for Copenhagen (Bergh)54. Learning from The Bridge project (Breen)55. Creating non-orthogonal architecture (Vollers)56. Design in Strategy (Frieling)
  • the bookVan der Voordt & Jong (2002) Ways to Study CONTENTS Introduction A.Naming and describing Empirical research B.Design research and typology C.Evaluating D.Modeling E.Programming and optimizing F.Technical Study G.Design Study H.Study by design Epilogue Study by design determined variable OBJECT determined design research design study variable typological research study by design CONTEXT