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Statics: Lecture1a
 

Statics: Lecture1a

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    Statics: Lecture1a Statics: Lecture1a Presentation Transcript

    • Today: Chapter 1, 2.1-2.4, 3.1-3.3-  Concept of a Force-  Force as a vector, decomposition of forces-  Some vector algebra-  Newton’s laws-  Equilibrium of Forces
    • Aerodynamic force
    • Vector: magnitude and direction
    • Sukhoi 37:Vectored thrust
    • Coordinate system
    • 4 3
    • Scalar product
    • Decomposition along non-orthogonal axes 1 3 1 1
    • Model as particle
    • Resultant force (in case of a particle)Single force that replaces all forces acting on a particle.
    • Newton’s laws (Principa,1687)-Law I A particle remains at rest or continues to move with uniform velocity (in a straight line with a constant speed) if there is no unbalanced force acting on it.-Law 2 The acceleration of a particle is proportional to the vector sum of forces acting on it, and is in the direction of this vector sum.-Law 3 The forces of action and reaction between interacting bodies are equal in magnitude, opposite in direction, and collinear (they lie on the same line)
    • Static equilibrium (Newton’s first law)The resultant is equal to zeroOr, the sum of forces in and directions are zero