Workbook for
Ethics and Engineering
Applied Physics
Chemical Engineering
Biochemical Engineering
Life Science & Technology...
Table of contents
1. SCIENTIFIC FRAUD AND CODES OF CONDUCT ............................... 5
1.1. INTRODUCTION...............
3
Preface
This Workbook, together with the Reader Ethics and Engineering, contains the
teaching material for the ethics co...
Ethics and Engineering: Introduction workbook
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Ethics and Engineering: Introduction workbook

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Ethics and Engineering: Introduction workbook

  1. 1. Workbook for Ethics and Engineering Applied Physics Chemical Engineering Biochemical Engineering Life Science & Technology Materials Science and Engineering WM0320TN; WM0329TU Edition: September 2009 Edited by dr D. Koepsell and ir B. Taebi Several chapters that will not be used in the class have been omitted from the September 2007 edition. Chapter 1, 3, 4 and 6 have been revised and Chapters 2 and 7 concern two new added chapters with assignments on the topics of normative ethics and sustainability. Edition: September 2007. Edited by dr H. Zandvoort, ir G.J. van Hasselt and ir B. Taebi Edition: September 2005. Edited by dr H. Zandvoort, dr J.A.B.A.F. Bonnet and ir G.J. van Hasselt with the assistance of dr J.J. Kole. This Workbook is a merger of the Workbook “Ethics and Life Science and Technology Ethics and (Bio)Chemical Engineering” (code wm0329st), edition January 2005, and the Workbook Ethics for Applied Physics (code: wm0320tn). The text of these two preceding workbooks has been modified at several places. As a consequence, these preceding workbooks can no longer be used in the courses wm0320tn and wm0329st.
  2. 2. Table of contents 1. SCIENTIFIC FRAUD AND CODES OF CONDUCT ............................... 5 1.1. INTRODUCTION.....................................................................................5 1.2. QUESTIONS .........................................................................................5 1.3. “IN THE MATTER OF J HENDRIK SCHÖN” ......................................................6 1.4. “FRAUD IN THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES”...........................................................9 1.5. PROFESSIONAL CODE OF THE KIVI-NIRIA ................................................. 12 1.6. NSPE CODE OF ETHICS FOR ENGINEERS .................................................... 14 2. PHILOSOPHICAL ETHICS............................................................... 21 2.1. META-ETHICS, NORMATIVE ETHICS, AND APPLIED ETHICS .............................. 21 2.2. QUESTIONS ....................................................................................... 21 2.3. ON GENIES AND BOTTLES: SCIENTISTS’ MORAL RESPONSIBILITY AND DANGEROUS TECHNOLOGY R&D..................................................................................... 22 3. NORMATIVE ARGUMENTATION; THE NUCLEAR CASE................... 35 3.1. TO RECYCLE OR NOT TO RECYCLE? .......................................................... 36 4. ETHICAL PROBLEMS IN THE DESIGN OF TECHNOLOGY................ 49 4.1. HIGHWAY SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS............................................................ 49 4.2. QUESTIONS: ...................................................................................... 50 5. THE CHALLENGER LAUNCH DECISION .......................................... 53 5.1. ROLE-PLAY. THE CHALLENGER LAUNCH DECISION.......................................... 53 5.2. THE SPACE SHUTTLE TRAGEDY AND THE ETHICS OF ENGINEERING...................... 57 6. MULTINATIONALS IN NON-WESTERN COUNTRIES ...................... 61 6.1. BHOPAL ............................................................................................ 61 6.2. QUESTIONS ....................................................................................... 61 6.3. THE UNION CARBIDE PLANT AT BHOPAL .................................................... 62 6.4. UNION CARBIDE AND THE INDIAN GOVERNMENT........................................... 64 6.5. BHOPAL REVISITED: THE VIEW FROM BELOW .............................................. 64 7. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND THE CASE OF BIOFUEL.......... 69 7.1. OVERVIEW......................................................................................... 69 7.2. LIFE-CYCLE ASSESSMENT ....................................................................... 70 7.3. BIOFUELS AND GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS ............................................... 71 7.4. LAND USE.......................................................................................... 72 7.5. WATER CONSUMPTION .......................................................................... 79 7.6. BIODIVERSITY .................................................................................... 80
  3. 3. 3 Preface This Workbook, together with the Reader Ethics and Engineering, contains the teaching material for the ethics course for the MSc programmes Applied Physics, Materials Science and Engineering and for the MSc programmes Biochemical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, and Life Science & Technology. Whereas the Reader looks at ethical issues in engineering and technology from a general and theoretical perspective, the Workbook provides specific examples, cases, questions for discussion, and exercises. The Workbook provides the material for the Working group-part of the course. For all information regarding the set-up and organisation of the course we refer to the relevant pages on Blackboard. Students attending working group sessions will have conferred with their tutors before each session to devise a schedule and plan for each working group meeting. Typically, two students divide the duty of chairing a half of each session. So, student A will chair the first 45 minutes, and Student B will chair the second. The chair shall have devised a brief presentation, summing up the reading and leading the discussion of the reader and workbook materials for his or her term as chair. The chair should provoke discussion, stimulate participation, and prepare fully for his or her session. Each chair for each session might, following a summation and discussion of questions also devise an exercise based upon the materials, including an impromptu debate, supplemental role play, slide-show presentation, or similar excercies applying the materials to a real-world or hypothetical case. Be imaginative. Before the first meeting, tutors will have selected chairs for the first meeting, after which students and tutors may develop a schedule for all following sessions for the quarter. Attendence at the working groups is mandatory, and the final meeting will involve brief presentations by all students. This workbook should provide the framework for the tutorials, but students and tutors are encouraged to bring in external materials, issues, and questions as time and interest allows.

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