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Subculture pt2
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  • Is it legitimate to manufacture anarchy? Does it have any real meaning? Punk became the most important cultural phenomenon of the late 20th century", McLaren would later assert. "Its authenticity stands out against the karaoke ersatz culture of today, where everything and everyone is for sale.... [P]unk is not, and never was, for sale.” Or they were a cynical con: something with which "to sell trousers", as McLaren said in 1989;a "carefully planned exercise to embezzle as much money as possible out of the music industry", as Jon Savage characterizes McLaren's core theme in The Great Rock 'n' Roll Swindle;[215] "cash from chaos" as the movie repeatedly puts it
  • Is it legitimate to manufacture anarchy? Does it have any real meaning? Punk became the most important cultural phenomenon of the late 20th century", McLaren would later assert. "Its authenticity stands out against the karaoke ersatz culture of today, where everything and everyone is for sale.... [P]unk is not, and never was, for sale.” Or they were a cynical con: something with which "to sell trousers", as McLaren said in 1989;a "carefully planned exercise to embezzle as much money as possible out of the music industry", as Jon Savage characterizes McLaren's core theme in The Great Rock 'n' Roll Swindle;[215] "cash from chaos" as the movie repeatedly puts it
  • Graffiti can be seen as a form of communication. This quality of graffiti art, as a communicative convention, is a common feature of the "subculture" as explored by authors, primarily, Hebdige (1979). …The methods used by a "subculture" to communicate provide the opportunity for anthropologists to gain perspective and insight on graffiti as a subculture born of contemporary mainstream culture.
  • Is it legitimate to manufacture anarchy? Does it have any real meaning? Punk became the most important cultural phenomenon of the late 20th century", McLaren would later assert. "Its authenticity stands out against the karaoke ersatz culture of today, where everything and everyone is for sale.... [P]unk is not, and never was, for sale.” Or they were a cynical con: something with which "to sell trousers", as McLaren said in 1989;a "carefully planned exercise to embezzle as much money as possible out of the music industry", as Jon Savage characterizes McLaren's core theme in The Great Rock 'n' Roll Swindle;[215] "cash from chaos" as the movie repeatedly puts it
  • Is it legitimate to manufacture anarchy? Does it have any real meaning? Punk became the most important cultural phenomenon of the late 20th century", McLaren would later assert. "Its authenticity stands out against the karaoke ersatz culture of today, where everything and everyone is for sale.... [P]unk is not, and never was, for sale.” Or they were a cynical con: something with which "to sell trousers", as McLaren said in 1989;a "carefully planned exercise to embezzle as much money as possible out of the music industry", as Jon Savage characterizes McLaren's core theme in The Great Rock 'n' Roll Swindle;[215] "cash from chaos" as the movie repeatedly puts it
  • JR, a semi-anonymous French street artist, uses his camera to show the world its true face, by pasting photos of the human face across massive canvases. At TED2011, he makes his audacious TED Prize wish: to use art to turn the world inside out. Learn more about his work and learn how you can join in at insideoutproject.net.

Transcript

  • 1. +DEBATE & POLEMIC RAGE & REASON IN A WORLD OF MANIFESTOS SUBCULTURES PT: 2
  • 2. + SUBCULTURES - Pt. 2
  • 3. + Sex Pistols Imagery Conceptual Anarchy An „artistic response‟?
  • 4. + BANKSY
  • 5. BANKSY’S MANIFESTO+ to exist who runit our cities profit…. The people whobecause theyour neighborhoodsthe“The peopleright unless makes a don‟t understand graffiti truly deface think nothing hasare the companies that scrawl giant slogans across buildings and buses trying to make usfeel inadequate unless we buy their stuff…. Any advertisement in public space that givesyou no choice whether you see it or not is yours, it belongs to you. It‟s yours totake, rearrange and reuse. Asking for permission is like asking to keep a rock someonejust threw at your head….
  • 6. “Is graffiti art or vandalism?” Banksy asks himself on+ his official website. “That word has a lot of negative connotations and it alienates people, so no, I don‟t like to use the word „art‟ at all.”
  • 7. +Banksy covertly adds his own works onto the walls of major museums in both the UKand the US. He says: “The Art we look at is made by only a select few. A small groupcreate, promote, purchase, exhibit and decide the success of Art. Only a few hundredpeople in the world have any real say. When you go to an Art gallery you are simply atourist looking at the trophy cabinet of a few millionaires...”
  • 8. + “Some people want to make the world a better place. I just wanna make the world a better-looking place. If you don’t like it, you can paint over it!”
  • 9. +“The thing I hate the most about advertising is that it attracts all thebright, creative and ambitious young people, leaving us mainly with theslow and self-obsessed to become our artists. Modern art is a disasterarea. Never in the field of human history has so much been used by somany to say so little”.
  • 10. + Banksy in the Streets “Bus stops are far more interesting and useful places to have art than in museums. Graffiti has more chance of meaning something or changing stuff than anything indoors. Graffiti has been used to start revolutions, stop wars, and generally is the voice of people who aren‟t listened to. Graffiti is one of those few tools you have if you have almost nothing. And even if you don‟t come up with a picture to cure world poverty you can make somebody smile while they‟re having a piss.”
  • 11. + Banksy on the West Bank Braving threats and even warning shots from Israeli security forces, Banksy managed to make a statement through his works on the West Bank barrier. Reactions were mixed to his contributions to the wall, but the coverage certainly raised global attention. This kind of work shows the development of Banksy from a local subversive to an artist with a global political agenda.
  • 12. + JR on the West Bank  Like Banksy, JR has something to say. Taking the idea of „gallery work to the streets‟ to a new level. His wish is to use art – to “turn the world inside out”.
  • 13. + Urban Culture & Graffiti Art The Manifesto of JR  Like Banksy, JR has something to say.  Taking the idea of a „sidewalk gallery‟ to a new level.  Big ambition – to “turn the world inside out”.  JR, a semi-anonymous French street artist, uses his camera to show the world its true face, by pasting photos of the human face across massive canvases. At TED2011, he makes his audacious TED Prize wish: to use art to turn the world inside out. Learn more about his work and learn how you can join in at insideoutproject.net.  http://www.ted.com/talks/jr_s_ted_prize_wish_use_art_to_turn_the _world_inside_out.html