Planning for the Future by Carol Collier, Executive Director, Delaware River Basin Commission

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Planning for the Future by Carol Collier, Executive Director, Delaware River Basin Commission

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Planning for the Future by Carol Collier, Executive Director, Delaware River Basin Commission

  1. 1. Planning for the Future of the Delaware River Basin Carol R. Collier, AICP Executive Director Delaware River Basin Commission
  2. 2. 2006 Land Use/Land Cover NOAA CSC WATER BARREN 2% <1% WETLANDS 8% DEVEL 15% FOREST 6,288 mi2 BASIN AG 26% 49% WETLANDS WATER 2% 6% BARREN DEVEL 10% FOREST 1925 mi2 58% CENTRAL AG 24% WETLANDS 3% WATER 2% FOREST BARREN 2,778 mi2 AG 13% 81% UPPER REGION DEVEL 1%
  3. 3. Outstanding Regional Resource      Exceptional water quality Exceptional source water Ecological diversity ~75% of non-tidal river part of National Wild and Scenic Rivers System 100% of non-tidal river is Special Protection Waters
  4. 4. Delaware River Watershed Facts     Over 15 million people (about 5% of the U.S. population) rely on the waters of the basin Drains 13,539 mi² , or 0.4 of 1% of the continental U.S. land area Longest undammed river east of the Mississippi Daily water withdrawal in the DRB = 8.7 BGD 1 5
  5. 5. Head of Tide
  6. 6. Delaware River Port Complex – Largest Fresh Water Port
  7. 7. Salt Line (250 mg/l, 7 day avg) Water Supply Intakes RM 110 1960’s Maximum M O N TH Normal R.M. 77 Ja n Fe b Ma r Ap r Ma y J un J ul Aug Se p Oct N ov Dec A V G . M I D -M O N TH L O C A TI O N 68 68 67 61 64 67 72 77 79 81 80 74 Data for determination provided by the U.S. Geological Survey and Kimberly Clark Corp.
  8. 8. Holistic Basin Management Is A Necessity!  There is not enough water for all uses during drought conditions  Water needed for other uses –  Navigation, ecological flows, recreation, wastewater assimilative capacity  More Complex – boundary of four states
  9. 9. Interconnected Water Resources
  10. 10. Fish Consumption Advisories
  11. 11. DRBC Special Protection Waters Program ―It is the policy of the Commission that there be no measurable change to existing water quality except towards natural conditions …‖
  12. 12. Water Quality  Federal Wild and Scenic River Designation – ¾ of non-tidal river  Total non-tidal river and its watershed designated DRBC Special Protection Waters  Mainstem = longest stretch of anti-degradation waters in U.S.  No measurable change in water quality
  13. 13. Vulnerability of Headwaters  Headwaters are the most sensitive areas of a watershed  Existing contiguous forest is critical to water quantity and quality  Philadelphia Source Water Protection Analysis  #1 – Change in Delaware River Headwaters
  14. 14. Aerial view of a Marcellus Shale well site near Waynesburg, Pa. (MICHAEL BRYANT / Phila. Inquirer Photographer )
  15. 15. Issues knocking on our door Sea Level Rise More Intense Storms Summer Droughts
  16. 16. Rutgers – Office of State Climatologist
  17. 17. Flood Mitigation
  18. 18. Regional Changes— Northeast/Mid-Atlantic U.S. N o rth east U S S ea level tren d s, 1950-1999 (m m /yr) 0 .0 0 E a stp o rt, M E B a r Ha rb o r, M E P o rtla n d , M E B o sto n , M A W o o d s Ho le , M A Ne wp o rt, R I 1 .0 0 2 .0 0 3 .0 0 4 .0 0 5 .0 0 In the Northeast/MidAtlantic U.S., sea level is rising much faster than the global average, most likely due to local land subsidence. P ro vid e n ce , R I Ne w L o n d o n , C T M o n ta u k, NY W ille ts P o in t, NY T h e B a tte ry, NY S a n d y Ho o k, NJ Inferred subsidence rates are -0.6 to 2.7 mm yr-1. A tla n tic C ity, NJ P h ila d e lp h ia , P A L e we s, D E B a ltim o re , M D A n n a p o lis, M D S o lo m o n s Isla n d , M D W a sh in g to n , D C G lo u ce ste r P o in t, V A S e we lls P o in t, V A G lo b a l a ve ra g e Source – Ray Najjar Over the 21st Century, this is an additional sea-level rise of -6 to 27 cm. Sources: Zervas (2001), Church et al. (2004)
  19. 19. Water-level change at Philadelphia 1900 1920 1940 1960 1980 2000 Source: NOAA (2011)
  20. 20. Salt Line (250 mg/l, 7 day avg) Water Supply Intakes RM 110 1960’s Maximum M O N TH Normal R.M. 77 Ja n Fe b Ma r Ap r Ma y J un J ul Aug Se p Oct N ov Dec A V G . M I D -M O N TH L O C A TI O N 68 68 67 61 64 67 72 77 79 81 80 74 Data for determination provided by the U.S. Geological Survey and Kimberly Clark Corp.
  21. 21. Water Intakes at Risk from Drought and Sea Level Rise: location of the salt line at high tide during drought Power • Exelon Delaware Generating Station • Exelon Richmond Generating Station • Philadelphia Gas Works Richmond Industrial • Koch Material Co. • NGC Industries • Rohm and Haas Philadelphia • MacAndrew and Forbes Co. • Pennwalt Corporation • Sunoco Public Supply • Torresdale Water Intake (provides • almost 60% of Philadelphia’s water supply) • New Jersey American Water Co. Tri-County Water Treatment Plant
  22. 22. Will We Have Enough Water?  More water needed to control salt line  Existing reservoirs will not be as effective with intense storms. Green and grey infrastructure solutions  DRBC Strategy for Sustainable Water Resources – 2060   Develop resiliency Shot-term; long-term
  23. 23. Sustainable Water Resources 2060 – Change and Location  Energy Generation – Water Footprint  Ecological Flows  Natural Gas Development?  Point and Non-Point Pollution  Climate Change  Population  Sea level rise, intense storms, droughts
  24. 24. Needs  Need    to look holistically – Water system Geography Stakeholders  Upstream Impacts on Downstream  Downstream needs driving upstream mgt.  Basin-wide Solutions  Plan Basin-wide; Implement locally
  25. 25. We need your help to manage the resource www.DRBC.net
  26. 26. Key Issues  Water   Quality PCBs, nutrients and emergent contaminants Keeping the Clean Water Clean  Water for Energy  Natural Gas Development  Climate Change   Sea level rise Floods and droughts
  27. 27. POTENTIAL IMPACTS – Major Water Supplies – Trenton  Flood Mitigation – Reservoir Storage  Land Use Changes in Headwaters  Salinity  Loss of forests, increased impervious  Water  Big   Quality Degradation Changes in Water Management Needed Place-based assessment and solutions IWRM
  28. 28. How to Proceed With Minimal Funds  Benefit of good data sets  Working with Federal Agencies  USGS – Water Census Pilot • Ecological Flows • Water Use Updates – 2010 data, energy sector • WATERS Model – Scenario testing  NOAA – IWRSS • Mid-Atlantic Basins Pilot  USACE • Salinity – Flow Model • State Collaborative – Proof of Concept

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