Social Media in the        School Library        SLMS Use of Social Media                   andInstructing Students in Usi...
IntroductionToday’s students are immersed in dynamic online networks. Web 2.0 has resulted insites that increase social in...
Click the infographic to view a larger PDF version.
Social NetworksSocial networks, the most popular form of social media, allow users to createprofiles and build personal net...
Social Networks                                     Pt.2Use of Social Networks• Use social networking sites as a place for...
BlogsPopular blogging platforms include Blogger, Glogster, Tumblr, WordPress, Blog.com,and LiveJournal. Glogster is a grea...
WikisWikis allow the easy creation and editing of web pages. All participants have theability to add, modify, or delete co...
Mind-Mapping ToolsOnline mind-mapping tools allow students to visualize their thoughts throughcharts, graphs, graphic orga...
More Social MediaGoodReadsStudents can use this social book cataloging site to let others know what theyare reading, rate ...
More Social Media                                       Pt.2LivebindersThis virtual three ring binder can be used to organ...
Online Tool SuitesOnline tool suites are, “web-based applications- such as word processing,spreadsheet, electronic present...
Social Media InstructionMany schools are hesitant to incorporate social media for fear of inappropriatecontent, cyberbully...
Social Media Instruction                What is your online reputation?SLMS should help students realize that their online...
Social Media Instruction                          Real-World ExamplesThe SLMS can make students aware of the dangers of ab...
Social Media Instruction                                  EdmodoEdmodo is a great option for SLMS who want to instruct stu...
Social Media Instruction                           Other ExamplesHost Social Media Training SessionsDevelop presentations ...
AASL Standards1.3.4 Contribute to the exchange of ideas within the learning community.1.3.5 Use information technology res...
ReferencesAmerican Library Association. (2007). ALA standards for the 21st-century learner. Retrieved from http://www.ala....
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Social Media in the School Library

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  • Social Media in the School Library

    1. 1. Social Media in the School Library SLMS Use of Social Media andInstructing Students in Using Social Media
    2. 2. IntroductionToday’s students are immersed in dynamic online networks. Web 2.0 has resulted insites that increase social interaction and allow users to contribute to online content.Social media includes web and mobile technologies that promote communication andinteraction between individuals. Popular social media sites include: Facebook,YouTube, Twitter, Pinterest, Tumblr, Blogger, Glogster, Google+, Wikispaces.Many schools are hesitant to embrace social media for fear of distractions,cyberbullying, inappropriate content, and privacy concerns. School media specialistscan alleviate these concerns by guiding students and teachers through theoverwhelming world of social media. This involves instructing students in the properuse of social tools. They must know how to protect their privacy online and acquirethe netiquette necessary to participate in meaningful online communication.“Rather than focusing exclusively on problems, educators should be experimentingwith how these new forms of social media can amplify student learning. Becausesocial media enables collaboration, educators should be asking what social dimensionsof learning might be enhanced by using these tools and networks?”- Tina Barseghian
    3. 3. Click the infographic to view a larger PDF version.
    4. 4. Social NetworksSocial networks, the most popular form of social media, allow users to createprofiles and build personal networks that connect them to other users.Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Myspace, LinkedIn are the most visited socialnetworks.Before deciding where to create a school profile, SLMS must know where theircommunity gathers. This can be accomplished through conversations withstudents, teachers, and parents to discover their preferred social networkingsites. These conversations should be done regularly as social network’s popularitychanges. Social Network Facts• 9 out of every 10 US internet users are members of a social network.• 1 of 5 minutes spent online is on a social network.• In one minute, we produce 694, 980 status updates.• 80% of social media posts are about the poster.• 1 out of every 8 people on Earth are Facebook members.
    5. 5. Social Networks Pt.2Use of Social Networks• Use social networking sites as a place for students, teachers, and parents toreceive information and updates relating to the school library programs andresources.• Provide a place for followers to post comments or questions about programsand materials• Post photos and news updates relating to library events• Host a book discussion group• Students post status updates describing what they learn in class each day• Share informal news with parents• Assignment due date reminders• Photos photos of student work
    6. 6. BlogsPopular blogging platforms include Blogger, Glogster, Tumblr, WordPress, Blog.com,and LiveJournal. Glogster is a great option for addressing privacy issues. The site’sEDU section provides a private classroom management platform for teachers andstudents.School libraries can use these “web-based logs or journals” to:• Allow students to serve as the teacher by presenting material to an online audience• Provide opportunities for students to analyze, evaluate, and create content for a global audience• Receive constructive feedback and gain awareness of other perspectives• Showcase student work (Ex: Marie Knee’s kindergarten blog)• Post homework assignments, important reminders, and discussion questions (Ex: high school english teacher, Anne Smith’s, blog)• Allow students to serve as scribes for a class blog by posting notes and comments from the day’s lesson.
    7. 7. WikisWikis allow the easy creation and editing of web pages. All participants have theability to add, modify, or delete content. Wikispaces, one of the most popular wikisites, provides private pages for student and teacher collaboration.School libraries can use Wikis to:• Summarize lessons• Monitor student participation during group projects by viewing the edit history• Take the place of e-mail communication between students as they complete group projects• Note collaboration between students through text, images, helpful links, and videos
    8. 8. Mind-Mapping ToolsOnline mind-mapping tools allow students to visualize their thoughts throughcharts, graphs, graphic organizers, and timelines. Popular tools include Wallwisher,Dipity, Timeglider, Bubbl, Cacoo, Board800.School Libraries can use mind-mapping tools to:• Promote active learning among students as they perform learning activities while they are learning them• Share their opinions, support their ideas, and consider other viewpoints• Create exit cards for student feedback• Develop concept maps, causation charts, and timelines• Create flow charts illustrating visual content• Brainstorm writing ideas• Analyze literature by identifying main idea, supporting details, characters, etc.
    9. 9. More Social MediaGoodReadsStudents can use this social book cataloging site to let others know what theyare reading, rate books, and discuss them with friends.PinterestThe social photo sharing site can be used to create boards relating to specificsubjects. The tool would allow students to organize resources for classpresentations and projects. Students can use collaborative pin boards to gathercontent for group projects.LearnistThe site’s interface mimics Pinterest with a focus on education. Users create a“LearningBoard” for a topic and add content they find while browsing theweb. Content can include images, wikipedia articles,YouTube videos, ebooks,user uploaded documents, etc.
    10. 10. More Social Media Pt.2LivebindersThis virtual three ring binder can be used to organize websites, videos,documents, and images within tabs and subtabs. Users can createpresentations, organize class resources, collaborate on shared binders, orcomplete Webquests.FlickrThe photo sharing site can be used to host and share photos of library events.Students can use the site for virtual field trips, visual storytelling exercises, andother presentations.
    11. 11. Online Tool SuitesOnline tool suites are, “web-based applications- such as word processing,spreadsheet, electronic presentation, and calendar tools- that provide users withan integrated platform for creating, sharing, and collaborating” (McLeod and Lehmann ,137).While Google Apps for Education is the most well known online tool suite, Zoho,Thinkfree, and Microsoft also provide similar services.GoogleDocs allows students to:• Create and edit word processing documents, presentations, and spreadsheets.• Store documents online and accessed them from any computer• Edit documents simultaneously with multiple users• Monitor revision history to discover who made changes and when
    12. 12. Social Media InstructionMany schools are hesitant to incorporate social media for fear of inappropriatecontent, cyberbullying, and privacy violations. The SLMS must takeresponsibility for instructing students in personal responsibility online if theyhope to include social media in the school media center and classrooms.
    13. 13. Social Media Instruction What is your online reputation?SLMS should help students realize that their online activities can impact theirreputation with peers, family members, supervisors, and employers. The SLMSmay use the following questions to encourage students to consider theironline reputation.•What image do you present to your friends through social networks? Howdoes this differ from what you would want your parents, prospective college,or employer to see?• If you “Google” yourself are you happy with what you see?• Do you regularly monitor your social networks for inappropriate comments, images, or other content?
    14. 14. Social Media Instruction Real-World ExamplesThe SLMS can make students aware of the dangers of abusing social media by citingreal world examples and their consequences. Social networking scandals involvingpolitical figures and celebrities are frequently featured in the news and the 2012Olympics have been filled with instances of social network abuse. .Recent Stories Include:• Olympic athletes, Michel Morganella and Voula Papachristou, were removed from the competition after posting racist comments on their Twitter accounts.• A 17-year-old fan was arrested for tweeting life threatening comments on Olympian, Tom Daley’s page.
    15. 15. Social Media Instruction EdmodoEdmodo is a great option for SLMS who want to instruct students in socialmedia within a secure environment. The social network provides a place forteachers, students, and parents to connect and collaborate. The site’s interfaceresembles Facebook, but it provides a setting that is closed to public access.Edmodo users can...• Submit assignments, check grades, read teacher’s comments, participate indiscussion postings and polls, receive badges for their achievements, andcomplete quizzes• Learn social network skills by following and participating in onlineconversations and learning netiquette for voicing their opinion and respondingto opposing viewpoints
    16. 16. Social Media Instruction Other ExamplesHost Social Media Training SessionsDevelop presentations for students, teachers, and parents relating to popularsocial media sites. Design these sessions to demonstrate how participants canuse the technology and safely share their information. The SLMS should alsoplan to include examples of how the technology can be used to facilitateteaching and learning.Privacy Setting AssistanceMany social media sites, especially Facebook, contain complicated privacysettings. SLMS can help students understand this process by hosting trainingsessions describing these settings to ensure they are able to hide personalinformation from the public.
    17. 17. AASL Standards1.3.4 Contribute to the exchange of ideas within the learning community.1.3.5 Use information technology responsibly.3.1.2 Participate and collaborate as members of a social and intellectual network of learners.3.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to organize and display knowledge and understanding in ways that others can view, use, and assess.3.3.1 Solicit and respect diverse perspectives while searching for information, collaborating with others, and participating as a member of the community.4.1.7 Use social networks and information tools to gather and share information.4.3.1 Participate in the social exchange of ideas, both electronically and in person.4.3.4 Practice safe and ethical behaviors in personal electronic communication and interaction.
    18. 18. ReferencesAmerican Library Association. (2007). ALA standards for the 21st-century learner. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/aasl/standardsASCD. (2011). Students like social media. ASCD Policy Priorities, Winter 2011, v17(4). Retrieved fromhttp://www.ascd.org/publications/newsletters/policy-priorities/vol17/num04/Students-Like-Social-Media.aspxBarseghian, T. (2011, Oct 21). A case for using social media with learning. Retrieved from http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2011/10/a-case-for-using-social-media-with-learning/Bennett, S. (2012, July 30). The psychology of social networking. Retrieved from http://www.mediabistro.com/alltwitter/psychology-social-networking_b26066Hill, K. (2012, Oct 13). How to teach kids ‘digital literacy’?. Retrieved from http://www.forbes.com/sites/kashmirhill/2011/10/13/how-to-teach-kids-digital-literacy-build-a-private-social-network-playground-for-them/Fredrick, K. (Nov. 2011). Forging a positive cyber reputation: Who are you?. School Library Monthly, v28(2). Retrieved from http://www.schoollibrarymonthly.com/articles/Fredrick2011-v28n2p24.htmlFredrick, K. (May-June 2012). Fostering media-literate students. School Library Monthly, v28(8). Retrieved from http://www.schoollibrarymonthly.com/articles/Fredrick2012-v28n8p21.htmlMcLeod, S., & Lehmann, C. (2012). What school leaders need to know about digital technologies and social media. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Rubin, R. E. (2010). Foundations of library and information science. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers.Schmobs, J. (2012, Apr 3). Do you tweet?: Connectivism, social media, and school libraries. Retrieved from http://frombirnamwood.wordpress.com/2012/04/03/do-you-tweet-connectivism-social-media-and-school-libraries/Valenza, J. 14 ways k-12 librarians can teach social media. Retrieved from http://www.techlearning.com/default.aspx?tabid=67&entryid=746YALSA. (2011). Teens and social media in school and public libraries: A toolkit for librarians and library workers. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/yalsa/sites/ala.org.yalsa/files/content/professionaltools/Handouts/sn_toolkit11.pdf
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