Cons of Inclusion Education

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Cons of Inclusion Education

  1. 1. Inclusion: Why it Does Not Suit the Educational Needs For All By: Team D Kristen Purich Dee Ross Alyson Severino David Zwirz
  2. 2. Inclusion is defined as… “ Inclusive education means that all students in a school… become part of the school community.” They are included in the feeling of belonging among other students, teachers, and support staff. IDEA make it clear that schools have a duty to educate children with disabilities in general education classrooms. (Alper, 1999)
  3. 3. <ul><li>Due to disruptive behavior, mainstreaming may cause distractions to other students. </li></ul><ul><li>Mainstreaming adds frustration to the special education students because they may feel they are competing with the regular education students. </li></ul>Behavior & Feelings The Cons of Inclusion Education EDC 5001: Spring 2009
  4. 4. <ul><li>Students do not have the same support in a regular education classroom as compared to a self contained classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>There is not enough teachers in the regular education classroom to give each student with disabilities the instruction needed for potential understanding. </li></ul>Instructional Support The Cons of Inclusion Education EDC 5001: Spring 2009
  5. 5. <ul><li>The classes are bigger; more ability levels </li></ul><ul><li>Not enough time is spent reviewing a concept for students who require review, repetition, and instruction at a slower pace. </li></ul><ul><li>Students might not feel comfortable asking questions, in fear of the judgments from classmates </li></ul>Class Size… Too much! The Cons of Inclusion Education EDC 5001: Spring 2009
  6. 6. <ul><li>Seasoned general education teachers and newer special education teachers may not have a positive dynamic. </li></ul><ul><li>Older teachers are so used to working alone they may not be open to a true co-teaching environment. </li></ul><ul><li>Tension between both teachers is felt by students and classroom becomes a place that isn’t comfortable. </li></ul>Teacher Dynamics… Sour The Cons of Inclusion Education EDC 5001: Spring 2009
  7. 7. Improper/Poor Articulation between Co-Teachers The Cons of Inclusion Education EDC 5001: Spring 2009 <ul><li>• In an inclusive setting, vital information such as understanding IEP’s and the implementation of modifications and accommodations are often not articulated to the Regular Ed. Teacher </li></ul><ul><li>This causes a disconnect between teachers, which in turn takes away from effective teaching. </li></ul><ul><li>• There is often no official liaison provided for teachers who can give them practical, necessary advice </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Such as what the roles of each teacher should be in the case of an in-class support setting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How each should approach grading responsibilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How to create a dual roster so as to not ostracize students, etc. </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Special education students can not work as quick as regular education students and they notice when other students are done first. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This can lead to rushing assignments </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Regular education students see that the special education student as different. </li></ul><ul><li>Special education student does not seem to fit in with other students. </li></ul>Student Labeling General Ed vs. Special Ed The Cons of Inclusion Education EDC 5001: Spring 2009
  9. 9. <ul><li>Research shows significant gains measured by performance tests of deaf children who attend schools for the deaf </li></ul><ul><ul><li>These gains are not found in deaf children who attend mainstreamed programs (Cohen, 1994). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Inclusion denies many deaf students the right to be educated in the LRE due to communication barriers that may impede their education (USDOE, 1992). </li></ul><ul><li>The National Association of the Deaf is opposed to eliminating or restricting the “Full Continuum of Alternative Placements” found in IDEA. </li></ul>Research for Deaf Students The Cons of Inclusion Education EDC 5001: Spring 2009
  10. 10. <ul><li>General education teachers often lack the training, resources, and necessary supplies to adequately teach disabled students within their classrooms. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This can have negative impacts on both the special education and the regular education students. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Teachers are forced to spend more time helping a few students and because of this the majority of the class receives less attention. </li></ul><ul><li>The academic range within the class is too different to be properly taught by a single teacher </li></ul>General & Special Education The Cons of Inclusion Education EDC 5001: Spring 2009
  11. 11. <ul><li>Recent reports suggest that some parents of disabled students in NJ are requesting that their children be removed from the mainstream classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>Reasons include </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Inability to get needed services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Inability to integrate into the mainstream class </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Their children feeling segregated and depressed within classroom community </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parents should have the right to choose whether their children are mainstreamed or pullout programs. (Tomsho, 2007) </li></ul></ul>Parents Requesting Removal The Cons of Inclusion Education EDC 5001: Spring 2009
  12. 12. The Gifted and Talented The Cons of Inclusion Education EDC 5001: Spring 2009 <ul><li>Inclusion can hurt those students who are considered “gifted and talented.” </li></ul><ul><li>Gifted and talented students do not benefit from mainstreaming because they are held back by the pace of the curriculum. </li></ul><ul><li>Gifted and talented programs utilize large amounts of independent study and curricula that allows for more specialized, challenging assignments which prepare these types of students for bigger and better challenges; </li></ul><ul><li>Mainstreaming is the opposite of this. </li></ul><ul><li>It is an absolute disservice for these gifted students to be treated like everyone else. </li></ul>
  13. 13. And the Survey Says… The Cons of Inclusion Education EDC 5001: Spring 2009 <ul><li>A poll conducted by the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) in West Virginia revealed that “78 percent of respondents think disabled students won’t benefit from [inclusion]; 87 percent said other students won’t benefit either” (Issues…about Change, 1995). </li></ul><ul><li>This stems from the concern among teachers that inclusion causes a monopolizing of resources and teacher attention among Special Education students, which is a legitimate, well-founded concern. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Works Cited <ul><li>Alper, S. (1999, Feb 4). Children who learn together, learn to live together. Retrieved February 25, 2009, from Inclusion Web site: http://www.uni.edu/coe/inclusion/ </li></ul><ul><li>Cohen, Oscar (1994, October 20). 'Inclusion' should not include deaf students. Education Week. Retrieved February 25, 2009, from http://www.zak.co.il/d/deaf-info/old/inclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Tomsho, R. (2007, Nov 28). Parents of disabled students push for separate classes . Wall Street Journal . </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. Department of Education. (October, 1992). Policy Guidance. Retrieved February 25, 2009, from http:// www.zak.co.il/d/deaf -info/old/inclusion </li></ul><ul><li>(1995). Inclusion: The pros and cons. Southwest Educational Development Labortory , 4 (3) , Retrieved February 28, 2009, from http://www.sedl.org/change/issues/issues43.html </li></ul>

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