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Introduction to Farm to School

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    • 1. Farm to School: A National Perspective Debra Eschmeyer
    • 2. Farm to School Local, Farm fresh produce in schools School Gardens, Composting, Recycling Nutrition Education / Experiential Learning Farm tours / Visits by farmers
    • 3. What is Farm to School
      • Farm to school is a school-based program that connects schools (K-12) and local farms with the objectives of:
        • serving healthy meals in school cafeterias
        • improving student nutrition
        • providing agriculture, health and nutrition education opportunities
        • supporting small and medium-sized local and regional farmers
    • 4. Connecting local farmers to schools
      • buy and feature farm fresh foods
      • incorporate nutrition-based curriculum
      • provide students experiential learning opportunities through farm visits, gardening, and recycling programs
      • access to new markets
    • 5. Farm to Kindergarten Philadelphia - Pennsylvania
      • Snacks in class
      • Nutrition education
      • Farm tours, cooking demonstrations
      • Parent education
      • Statewide legislation and funding available to replicate Philadelphia model
    • 6. Florida, Georgia, Alabama
      • New North Florida Cooperative Association
      • Farmer-led
      • 15 school districts
      • 300,000 students
      • Value added products
      • Relationship marketing
    • 7. Chicago Public Schools
      • 385,000 lunches and breakfasts / day – 600 schools
      • Chartwells Thompson Hospitality contract
      • 2008 - Pilot program in 30 schools
      • Linkage with distributor and processor
      • Local products on menu twice a week
    • 8.
      • NM Dept. of Agriculture, Albuquerque Public School District, Farm to Table
      • $85,000 from the state for local fresh fruits & vegetables in schools
      • 12 schools
      • 6000 children
      Albuquerque, New Mexico Valley Cluster Project
    • 9. Organic Choices Salad Bar Olympia, Washington
      • Organic fruits & vegetables, whole grain bread, protein choices, eggs, soymilk
      • F&V consumption increased by 27%; meal participation increase by 16%
      • The organic food costs more, but the program is financially viable. No outside funding for project.
    • 10. Ohio Examples
    • 11. Ohio Examples
    • 12. Why we need Farm to School
    • 13. Why we need farm to school
      • For our Children
      • 2.3- to 3.3-fold increase in childhood obesity over the last 25 years.
      • Our children will be the first generation to have a life expectancy shorter than their parents.
      • 1 in 3 children born in 2000 will be diabetic in their lifetime (CDC).
    • 14. Why we need farm to school
      • For our Farmers
        • 330 farm operators leave their land every week.
        • The farmer’s share of every dollar spent on food has dropped to 19 cents from 41 cents in 1950.
        • In the 1930s, there were close to seven million farms in the United States. Today, just over two million farms remain— less than 1 percent of the country's population.
    • 15. Why we need farm to school
      • For our Environment
      • Crop Varieties lost between 1903-1983
      • Tomatoes: 80.6 percent
      • Lettuce: 92.8 percent
      • Corn: 90.8 percent
      • Apples: 86.2 percent
      • In the U.S., the typical food item now travels from 1,500 to 2,400 miles from farm to plate, i.e. A head of CA lettuce shipped to Washington DC requires 36x more fuel energy to transport than the food energy it provides.
    • 16. Why we need farm to school
      • Dollars and Sense
      Price of feeding one child school lunch during their tenure in k-12 = $6,000 Price of treating one adult for illness related to poor nutrition over the course of their life= $175,000 Farm to School = Priceless
    • 17. How you do Farm to School
    • 18. Implementing Farm to School
      • Local Product used in:
        • salad bars
        • hot entrees / other meal items
        • snack in classroom
        • taste tests
        • fundraisers
      • Educational Activities:
        • chef/farmer in class, cooking demos
        • greenhouses, waste management, recycling, and composting
        • farm tours
        • harvest of the month
        • CSA in the classroom
        • School gardens
    • 19. Let’s get started
        • Start small—taste testing, farm tour, apples
        • Organize various stakeholders/hold a meeting
        • Research area farmers
        • Contact food service director and school administration
        • Identify funding sources
        • Market the program
        • Volunteer
    • 20. National Farm to School Network Networking Training and Technical Assistance Policy Information Services Media and Marketing
    • 21.  
    • 22. www.farmtoschool.org Debra Eschmeyer [email_address] 419-753-3412
    • 23.  

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