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Us.1.The Carribean  Colonial
 

Us.1.The Carribean Colonial

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    Us.1.The Carribean  Colonial Us.1.The Carribean Colonial Presentation Transcript

    • A presentation by Flannery, Jo-el, Caitlin, Olivia
    • Geography
      • Climate – tropical, hot and humid; lots of rainfall
      • Soil – very thick for growing sugar cane
      • Crop – Sugar cane
      • Resources – very limited amount of resources
      • Major Towns – Cuba, Jamaica, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Barbuda, Montserrat, Antigua, Guadeloupe, Dominica, Martinique, St. Lucia, Barbados, St. Vincent, The Grenadines, Grenada, Tobago, Trinidad
      • Major Cities – Kingston, Bridgetown, Pitons
    • Founding
      • Original islanders  Tainos (Arawaks), Caribs, Lucayans
      • Tainos believed in an afterlife called “Coyaba” – “A hallowed land of dancing that was free of sickness, hurricanes, or hunger” (Caribbean-guide.info)
          • “ Cannibal” is derived from the Carib word “ karibna ” (Person)
      • Spanish Conquistadors mined gold from the Islands
      • Dutch, English and French formed colonies
    • Political Structure
      • The Dutch introduced the “Sugar Cane” system after leaving Brazil in 1640
      • In 1640 Barbados had 10,000 settlers
      • In 1680– 175 plant owners owned 54% of the land!
      • Total import of slaves: 263,700
      • Sugar plantations produced 80%-90% of sugar consumed in Western Europe
    • Primary Source: Cutting the Sugar Cane on the Island of Antigua
    • Jean Jacques Dessalines
      • A Revolutionary for Haiti
      • Declared independence
      • Renamed Saint-Domingues
      • Tried to keep sugar plantations running without slaves- a harsh work regimen
      • Changed education
    • Economy
      • Exported sugar cane
      • African slaves – were used to produce the sugar cane crop
      • Major cities – kingstone, Santo Domingo
    • Society
      • Spain, France, Britain, and some of the Dutch ruled the Caribbean (Africans were enslaved)
      • Natives lived by hunting, fishing, and gathering
      • Caribs: warlike and fierce
      • Arawaks: enslaved with the Africans and were originally peaceful
      • Caribs resisted Spaniards rule and named chiefs based on their ability to fight
    • Religion
      • Spain: Devoted Roman Catholicism
      • France: Roman Catholicism
      • Britain: Protestant
      • Africa: traditional African Religions
      • Arawaks (natives): Catholic by Spaniards
      • Caribs (natives): (not religious) Nature worshippers – EXTREMELY SUPERSTITIOUS
      • Dutch: Dutch reform religious beliefs
    • Bibliography
      • Unknown, Author. “From High Seas to High Life.” Caribbean-guide.info . Interactive Websites, Inc, Segisys. 2 October 2008. <http://caribbean- guide.info/past.and.present/history/>
      • Sandra W. Meditz and Dennis M. Hanratty, editors. “The Colonial Period.” Caribbean Islands: A Country Study . Washington: GPO for the Library of Congress, 1987. 2 October 2008. <http://countrystudies.us/caribbean-islands/>
      • &quot;Slave Imports to the Americas, 17th Century.&quot; American History . 2008. ABC-CLIO. 5 Oct. 2008 <http://www.americanhistory.abc-clio.com>.
      • Unknown, Author. “Caribbean.” Wikipedia . Wikimedia Foundation. 2 October 2008. <Wikipedia.org>
      • Phillips, Mike. “Cutting the Sugar Cane.” British Library . 5 October 2008. <http://www.bl.uk/onlinegallery/onlineex/carviewsvirtex/persjour/sugarcane/012zzz0001786c9u00004000.html>
      • &quot;Jean-Jacques Dessalines.&quot; Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia . 19 Sep 2008. 3 Oct 2008. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Jean-Jacques_Dessalines&oldid=239523634
      • Wikipedia Contributors.&quot;History of the Caribbean.&quot;  Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia . 17 Sep 2008, 14:54 UTC. 6 Oct 2008 < http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=History_of_the_Caribbean&oldid=239035438 >.
      • Knight, Franklin W. Geographic Setting . Commonwealth of the Caribbean Islands . Eds. Meditz, Sandra W. and Dennis M. Hanratty. Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, 1987. http://www.loc.gov/rr/frd/ . The Library of Congress. 2 October 2008. < http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgibin/query/r?frd/cstdy:@field(DOCID+cx0006) >.
      • Hudson, Rex, A and Daniel J. Seyler. Geography . Commonwealth of the Caribbean Islands . Eds. Meditz, Sandra W. and Dennis M. Hanratty. Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, 1987. http://www.loc.gov/rr/frd/ . The Library of Congress. 2 October 2008. < http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgibin/query/r?frd/cstdy:@field(DOCID+cx0023) >.
      • Map of the Caribbean Islands .
      • http://davidderrick.wordpress.com/category/americas/ . 6 October 2008. < http://davidderrick.files.wordpress.com/2007/09/caribbean.png >.