Thank you to our Sponsors
Good Morning andWelcome
WelcomeKeith WarrenDirector, CESA
Bev PuxleyConference Chairman
Thank you to our Sponsors
DEFRA INSIGHTLucy JohnsonPolicy Advisor for the SustainabilityEnergy Using Products TeamDEFRA
Contents    • Sustainable energy using products    • General Overview           - Energy Using Products and Energy Labelli...
What we do • Increase the sustainability of energy using products by   means of a range of product policies       -      E...
Why is consumption by productsimportant?UK electricity consumption in reference, policy and best available technology scen...
Energy Using Products and EnergyLabelling Framework directives• Complementary directives acting on both ends of the market...
Aim of Government Policies                                    PRODUCT INTERVENTIONS – Market change over time             ...
State of Play – UK   Projected UK savings from measures agreed to date  Product Type              Net CO2e Saved Net Energ...
State of Play – EU   Potential annual savings across EU by 2020 from   measures adopted or with imminent adoption        S...
The Directives• Ecodesign is the legal framework to set minimum standards  for environmental performance• Can be EU Regula...
Decision Making Process    Preparatory Study     •   Preparatory study to determine ecodesign                             ...
EuP Timeline for catering equipment  • Nov 2009 – Prep study underway for domestic and    commercial products such as oven...
EuP Overview – Implementing Measure • Products covered • Application dates • Generic and specific design requirements • Me...
Energy Labelling• Energy Labelling  Directive provides legal  framework for labelling  of products• Adopted as a  delegate...
Voluntary Agreements• Self-regulatory agreements are an option for implementing  measures under these directives• Complex ...
Manufacturers’ Obligations• Assess environmental aspects and impacts of product• Design and construct in compliance with e...
Market Surveillance Authority• National Measurement Office• Appointed in October 2009• Carry out a programme of risk based...
Impacts and OpportunitiesObligations:• Design and construct in compliance with eco-design  requirements• Carry out conform...
Opportunities  • Main trends in product ownership / usage / sales / technology /     efficiency / costs  • Use the energy ...
Get involvedStudy sites for key products:• Ovens - http://www.ecocooking.org/lot22/• Hobs and grills - http://www.ecocooki...
Get involved1. Independent evaluation of functioning of Directive   • Due to end December 2011   • http://www.cses.co.uk/e...
How we workWhat we do    Evidence & bi-annual indicative standards & economic assessmentEco-design                        ...
RoundupAny questions ?• Lucy.johnson@defra.gsi.gov.uk
Thank you to our Sponsors
HANDS-ON WITH INDUCTIONHayden GrovesExecutive ChefLloyds of London
Thank you to our Sponsors
Coffee and Demonstrations  In the Exhibition Area
Thank you to our Sponsors
CARBON TRUST: FOOD PREPARATION   AND CATERING CAN INCREASE    CARBON SAVINGS WITHOUT    COMPROMISING ON QUALITYAl-Karim Go...
Session Overview Legal and commercial drivers IEEA approach and general findings Catering Sector emissions and typical ene...
Legislative and energy cost drivers nota strong enough driver for industry toreduce energy use        Climate Change Agree...
Hence the IEEA was set up tounderstand energy flows anddrive deployment of innovationDeliver a step change reduction in CO...
Average best practice andinnovations savings of 29%identified across 13 sectors                            50%    Sector C...
UK Contract Catering sector is dominated by global players                                Top six contract caterers       ...
Mix of public and private sectorcatering outlets and largevariation in energy use       Calculation of carbon footprint by...
A range of energy consumingactivities: cooling, heating, cleaning                                      Contract Catering e...
Sub-metering would help tobetter determine whereinnovation needs to occurSource: CIBSE Energy efficiency in commercial kit...
Huge CO2 opportunity just aroundbest practices                                                                            ...
Cooking related opportunities     Potential for replacement of equipment on host sites     Equipment                 Repla...
General innovationopportunities                              Potential for Innovation                       Innovation    ...
Our site data indicatesvariances in energy useBusiness and Industry Site  • City-centre office built in 2007 with 850 staf...
We found similar varianceswith other site types    Host site        Meals Served/year      Benchmark CO2            CO2   ...
Thank You…..…………Questions?  Al-Karim.govindji@carbontrust.co.uk   020 7832 4610
Thank you to our Sponsors
INDUCTION EQUIPMENT HISTORY – HOW IT WORKS, WHERE IT‟S GOING…Stephen HobbsDirectorSignature FSE Ltd
Induction Equipment HistoryHow it works – Where is it going         Introduction     History of induction     How does it ...
Induction Equipment History   How it works – Where is it goingIntroduction to…Steve HobbsCompany director having some 25 y...
Induction Equipment History   How it works – Where is it goingIntroduction to…Now some 25 years later this is the ‘first’ ...
Induction Equipment HistoryHow it works – Where is it going         Introduction     History of induction     How does it ...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingHistory of ‘induction’…Who is this…..?
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingHistory of ‘induction’…Michael Faraday – eminent chemistand p...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingHistory of ‘induction’…Faraday developed the idea andconcept ...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingHistory of ‘induction’…So induction is not a ‘new’technology ...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingHistory of ‘induction’…Initially as a concept ‘induction’ was...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingHistory of ‘induction’…- industrial furnaces for rapid  melti...
Induction Equipment History   How it works – Where is it goingHistory of ‘induction’…It was not until mid to late 1970’s t...
Induction Equipment History   How it works – Where is it goingHistory of ‘induction’…development of this ‘cooking’ concept...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingHistory of ‘induction’…In the early 1980’s the concept of‘ind...
Induction Equipment HistoryHow it works – Where is it going         Introduction     History of induction     How does it ...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingInduction Cooking…How does it work…?Basic principle developed...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingHow does it work…?When you pass an electric currentthrough a ...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingHow does it work…?When a ‘ferric’ material is in contactwith ...
Induction Equipment History   How it works – Where is it goingHow does it work…?turning that ‘magnetic field’ on andoff yo...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingHow does it work…?in turn this process creates ‘friction’with...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingHow does it work…?therefore the ‘heating’ process isgenerated...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingHow does it work…?the quicker the ‘heating’ process…
Induction Equipment History      How it works – Where is it goingPan                              Magnetic fieldElectronic...
Induction Equipment History   How it works – Where is it goingHow does it work…?it’s not ‘magic’ it is a basic principleof...
Induction Equipment HistoryHow it works – Where is it going         Introduction     History of induction     How does it ...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Past…..Launched to the ‘foodservice’industry in t...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Past…..at that stage hugely expensive as apiece o...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Past…..this reputation is still in somepeoples mi...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Past…..since launched to the industry thecost of ...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Past…..driving product pricing down andreliabilit...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Present…..there are now multiple products onthe m...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Present…..Table top ‘plug & play’ type product…Pl...
‘Plug & Play’ type product……
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Present…..Inbuilt and inset type product…Buffet p...
‘Front of house’ type product……
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Present…..Production type product…Integrated as p...
‘main production’ type product……
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Present…..Production type product…single ring / m...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Present…..Production type product…hot box deliver...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Future…..As with all technologies…Smaller… lighte...
Induction Equipment HistoryHow it works – Where is it going         Introduction     History of induction     How does it ...
Induction Equipment History     How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Benefits…..90% energy efficientTest – 2 litres...
Induction Equipment History       How it works – Where is it going                             Induction                 T...
Induction Equipment History     How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Benefits…..90% energy efficientOnly works when...
Induction Equipment History     How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Benefits…..90% energy efficientNo loss of ener...
Induction Equipment History     How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Benefits…..Safety…..‘heat’ only generated in t...
Induction Equipment History     How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Benefits…..Controllability and speed…..Due to ...
Induction Equipment HistoryHow it works – Where is it going         Introduction     History of induction     How does it ...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingSummary…..History – not a ‘new’ conceptestablished for in exc...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingSummary…..How does it work…. It’s not magic it’sa basic law o...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingSummary…..Past…. Considered to be expensive tobuy / maintain ...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingSummary…..Present…. Wide selection of‘professional’ product o...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingSummary…..Future…. ‘You’ the chef / designer /specifier innov...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingSummary…..Benefits….High energy efficiencyEasy to useSafety i...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingSummary…..Think of induction as you would thinkof a PC…..
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingSummary…..The induction appliance you buy isthe ‘hardware’ - ...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingSummary…..but the higher the price….. As withany ‘PC’ it’s no...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingSummary…..software…. with your inductionappliance consider bo...
Induction Equipment History  How it works – Where is it goingThank you for listening…..Stephen Hobbs, CFSPDirector – Signa...
Thank you to our Sponsors
THE IMPORTANCE OF INDUCTION    COMPATIBLE COOKWAREMaurits DemeyereSenior PresidentDemeyere Cookware
Induction Cooking•   Principle of induction cooking•   Advantages of induction cooking•   Cookware for induction cooking• ...
Principle of Induction Cooking It is the only cooking system where the heating element is thebase of the cooking pot itse...
Advantages of Induction Cooking Enormous flexibility Better safety in general Better safety for children Easier cleani...
Cookware for Induction CookingFIRST CONDITION: MAGNETIC BASE     MATERIALS WHICH CANNOT BE USED         - cupper        ...
Disadvantages of Induction Cooking Relatively expensive hobs. There are serious quality  differences between different sy...
Discussion of different materials ENAMELED STEEL  - eventual chipping of the enamel layers  - uneven bottom temperature ...
Discussion of different materials (2)• COOKING POT OF STAINLESS STEEL SAE304  -Thermoconductive base ( or up to the edge )...
Discussion of different materials (3)•    COOKING POTS OF ALUMINUM WITH MAGNETIC BASE      Can be pure aluminum pots deep-...
Discussion of different materials (4)• COOKING POTS OF CUPPER WITH MAGNETIC BASEIt is possible to make good heavy “cupper ...
Conclusion   For good cooking quality, a chef is expecting two very    important factors that go together:      very eve...
THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF MATERIALS• Thermal conductivity ratio                          in cal. / cm.sec.C°     • Stainless...
ADVICE NEEDED FROM HOB AND POT MANUFACTURER• To make a change from ( mostly ) gas into induction is a big  adaptation.• Ge...
ADVICE NEEDED FROM HOB AND POT MANUFACTURER • 2)Round inductors or square or rectangular inductors. • depend on main use. ...
ADVICE NEEDED FROM HOB AND POT MANUFACTURER• Get a correct advice before you order  the pots and especially ... Don‟t wait...
IMPORTANT TIPS ON HOW TO USE POTS AND PANS• NEVER PLACE POTS OR PANS ONLY PARTLY OUTSIDE  INDUCTION ZONE .• -       Induct...
IMPORTANT TIPS ON HOW TO USE POTS AND PANS• NEVER PUT A LONG HANDLE OVER AN INDUCTOR.  ALWAYS HAVE THE LONG HANDLES OUTSID...
IMPORTANT TIPS ON HOW TO USE POTS AND PANS• Have enough practical training of pots on an induction  hob because most chefs...
IMPORTANT TIPS ON HOW TO USE POTS AND PANS• The chef has to realize that it has to be possible to fine  regulate at 300 W ...
Thanks you to our Sponsors
Demonstrations Followed by Lunch     in the Exhibition Area
Thank you to our Sponsors
Closing RemarksKeith WarrenDirector, CESA
Thank you to our Sponsors
CESA Induction Cooking Equipment Forum 2011 Presentations
CESA Induction Cooking Equipment Forum 2011 Presentations
CESA Induction Cooking Equipment Forum 2011 Presentations
CESA Induction Cooking Equipment Forum 2011 Presentations
CESA Induction Cooking Equipment Forum 2011 Presentations
CESA Induction Cooking Equipment Forum 2011 Presentations
CESA Induction Cooking Equipment Forum 2011 Presentations
CESA Induction Cooking Equipment Forum 2011 Presentations
CESA Induction Cooking Equipment Forum 2011 Presentations
CESA Induction Cooking Equipment Forum 2011 Presentations
CESA Induction Cooking Equipment Forum 2011 Presentations
CESA Induction Cooking Equipment Forum 2011 Presentations
CESA Induction Cooking Equipment Forum 2011 Presentations
CESA Induction Cooking Equipment Forum 2011 Presentations
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CESA Induction Cooking Equipment Forum 2011 Presentations

  1. 1. Thank you to our Sponsors
  2. 2. Good Morning andWelcome
  3. 3. WelcomeKeith WarrenDirector, CESA
  4. 4. Bev PuxleyConference Chairman
  5. 5. Thank you to our Sponsors
  6. 6. DEFRA INSIGHTLucy JohnsonPolicy Advisor for the SustainabilityEnergy Using Products TeamDEFRA
  7. 7. Contents • Sustainable energy using products • General Overview - Energy Using Products and Energy Labelling Directives - Compliance - Impacts and opportunities • Ways to get involved
  8. 8. What we do • Increase the sustainability of energy using products by means of a range of product policies - EU wide minimum energy performance and energy labelling standards - Supply chain and international engagement aimed at meeting the 2009 Low Carbon Transition Plan commitment to save 15 MtCO2 pa by 2020 in the UK.
  9. 9. Why is consumption by productsimportant?UK electricity consumption in reference, policy and best available technology scenarios
  10. 10. Energy Using Products and EnergyLabelling Framework directives• Complementary directives acting on both ends of the market PRODUCT INTERVENTIONS – Overall approach Cut out the Drive the existing market towards greater Encourage least sustainability development Numbers of products in the market sustainable of new, more products sustainable products Interventions: •Pricing and trading Interventions: •Voluntary initiatives Interventions: •Minimum •Producer responsibility • Support standards •Business support innovation •Procurement •Labelling •Public information Less PRODUCT SUSTAINABILITY More
  11. 11. Aim of Government Policies PRODUCT INTERVENTIONS – Market change over time Now Future 1 Future 2Numbers of products in the market Less PRODUCT SUSTAINABILITY More
  12. 12. State of Play – UK Projected UK savings from measures agreed to date Product Type Net CO2e Saved Net Energy Saved Average Annual Net Per Year in 2020 Per Year in 2020 Benefit, 2010-2020 (Mt CO2e) (TWh) (£m) Stand-by 2.1 3 £196m Simple Set Top Boxes 0.5 0.5 £47m Tertiary Lighting 1.55 3.6 £109m Power Supply Units 0.1 0.2 £4m Domestic Lighting 0.65 0.3 £108m Televisions 0.8 0.85 £100m Motors 1.4 3.35 £165m Cold Appliances 0.75 0.75 £88m Wash Machines 0.1 0.3 £18m Dishwashers 0.1 0.25 £18m Stand-alone Circulators 0.4 0.05 £13m Fans 0.15 0.4 £44m Total 8.6 13.5 £910m
  13. 13. State of Play – EU Potential annual savings across EU by 2020 from measures adopted or with imminent adoption Standby 35 TWh Simple set-top boxes 6 TWh Street & office lighting 38 TWh External power supplies 9 TWh Domestic lighting 39 TWh Electric motors 140 TWh Circulators 27 TWh Domestic fridges & freezers 5 TWh TVs 43 TWh Dishwashers 2 TWh Washing machines 1.5 TWh Fans 34 TWh Computer and displays 34 TWh
  14. 14. The Directives• Ecodesign is the legal framework to set minimum standards for environmental performance• Can be EU Regulations or voluntary initiatives from industry1. Sales within EU over 200,000 per annum2. Significant environmental impact within EU3. Significant potential for environmental savings without excessive costs
  15. 15. Decision Making Process Preparatory Study • Preparatory study to determine ecodesign requirements – 11-21 months Consultation Forum • Commission drafts implementing measure and considers discusses with stakeholders at Consultation implementing measure Forum • Commission: revises implementing measure; Regulatory Committee carries out impact assessment & inter-service decides on regulation consultation; and presents formal proposal to Regulatory Committee of Member States European Parliament • European Parliament scrutinises implementing scrutiny measure – 3 months • WTO notification, finalisation etc – 3-4 months Implementing • Adoption by Commission (translation and written measure agreed and procedure) – 5 months comes into force • Regular review to keep standards up to date
  16. 16. EuP Timeline for catering equipment • Nov 2009 – Prep study underway for domestic and commercial products such as ovens, hobs, grills and microwaves. • Typical timescale – 18 mths/2 yrs • Expect Consultation Forum 2011 • First measures and labels likely to be 2014
  17. 17. EuP Overview – Implementing Measure • Products covered • Application dates • Generic and specific design requirements • Measurement standards / methods • Conformity assessment procedures • Information requirements
  18. 18. Energy Labelling• Energy Labelling Directive provides legal framework for labelling of products• Adopted as a delegated act by European Commission
  19. 19. Voluntary Agreements• Self-regulatory agreements are an option for implementing measures under these directives• Complex Set Top Boxes and Imaging Equipment• Identifying some generic principles: • Market coverage; scope and ambition; monitoring and enforcement; civil society involvement• Proposals have been a good starting point for negotiation
  20. 20. Manufacturers’ Obligations• Assess environmental aspects and impacts of product• Design and construct in compliance with ecodesign requirements• Carry out conformity assessment (generally self- assessment)• Affix CE marking
  21. 21. Market Surveillance Authority• National Measurement Office• Appointed in October 2009• Carry out a programme of risk based and random product testing
  22. 22. Impacts and OpportunitiesObligations:• Design and construct in compliance with eco-design requirements• Carry out conformity assessment (generally self- assessment) and affix CE marking• Display the energy label (retailers)
  23. 23. Opportunities • Main trends in product ownership / usage / sales / technology / efficiency / costs • Use the energy label as a promotional tool • Energy Saving = Money Saving • Lead the market UK, EU and worldwide • Compliant products creates a level playing field • Proactive engagement with other Government initiatives e.g. Public procurement. • You will be „doing your bit‟ to help mitigate climate change.
  24. 24. Get involvedStudy sites for key products:• Ovens - http://www.ecocooking.org/lot22/• Hobs and grills - http://www.ecocooking.org/lot23/• Dishwashers –• http://www.ecowet-commercial.org/• Refrigeration –• http://www.ecofreezercom.org/• Air Con - http://www.ecohvac.eu/
  25. 25. Get involved1. Independent evaluation of functioning of Directive • Due to end December 2011 • http://www.cses.co.uk/ecodeisgn_evaluation2. Study to provide background information and analysis for (second) Working Plan • Due to end October 2011 • http://www.ecodesign-wp2.eu/3. Review and update of methodology for preparatory studies • Due to end September 2011 • http://www.meerp.eu/
  26. 26. How we workWhat we do Evidence & bi-annual indicative standards & economic assessmentEco-design Improve Directive compliance and enforcementMandatory EUlabelling Influence other policies Supply Chain International initiatives engagement
  27. 27. RoundupAny questions ?• Lucy.johnson@defra.gsi.gov.uk
  28. 28. Thank you to our Sponsors
  29. 29. HANDS-ON WITH INDUCTIONHayden GrovesExecutive ChefLloyds of London
  30. 30. Thank you to our Sponsors
  31. 31. Coffee and Demonstrations In the Exhibition Area
  32. 32. Thank you to our Sponsors
  33. 33. CARBON TRUST: FOOD PREPARATION AND CATERING CAN INCREASE CARBON SAVINGS WITHOUT COMPROMISING ON QUALITYAl-Karim GovindjiTechnology Acceleration ManagerCarbon Trust
  34. 34. Session Overview Legal and commercial drivers IEEA approach and general findings Catering Sector emissions and typical energy use in kitchens Level of implementation of best practices Some examples from our site visits
  35. 35. Legislative and energy cost drivers nota strong enough driver for industry toreduce energy use Climate Change Agreement – not relevant Carbon Reduction Commitment1 – Encourage facility owners to focus on their catering facilities Eco-design of energy related products – Minimum energy performance for categories of equipment Energy bills are not always paid by Caterers - so incentives are lowNote: Organisations using more than 6,000MWh per year of electricity (about £500,000)
  36. 36. Hence the IEEA was set up tounderstand energy flows anddrive deployment of innovationDeliver a step change reduction in CO2 from industrial processes by accelerating innovation in process control and the uptake of low-carbon technologies Tackle sector specific processes – the ‘black boxes’ that have not been looked at in detail before Understand and address the barriers to implementation of identified opportunities Mobilise whole sectors to increase implementation of opportunities
  37. 37. Average best practice andinnovations savings of 29%identified across 13 sectors 50% Sector Carbon Savings 40% Potential 30% 20% "Innovation" 10% "Good Practice" 0% Min Max
  38. 38. UK Contract Catering sector is dominated by global players Top six contract caterers Number of Contract Caterer sites/outlets Compass 7,000 Initial Catering Services Ltd 2,600 Sodexo 2,300 Elior 1,400 Aramark PLC 1,200 Carillion Services 1,000 Total of ~ 17,000 catering outlets Annual revenues of around £4bn within the larger catering market of £30bn (which includes restaurants, hotels, clubs) Catering outlets typically use 2.5x more energy/m2 than typical commercial buildings3Source: http://www.energystar.gov/ia/business/small_business/restaurants_guide.pdf
  39. 39. Mix of public and private sectorcatering outlets and largevariation in energy use Calculation of carbon footprint by sector for contract catering Meals served Total (Calc) Meals kWh/meal CO2 Segment served MWh tCO2 (2) kg/meal (m) (1) Business & Industry 582 1.00 0.30 582,000 174,600 Healthcare 250 1.20 0.54 300,000 135,950 Education 263 0.73 0.18 190,780 46,821 Local Authority 24 0.73 0.18 17,410 4,273 MoD 215 4.67 1.46 1,004,050 313,384 Other 183 1.00 0.30 183,000 54,900 Total 1,517 2,277,240 729,928 (1) BHA Food and Service Management Survey 2010 (2) CIBSE TM50 Energy Efficiency in Commercial Kitchens
  40. 40. A range of energy consumingactivities: cooling, heating, cleaning Contract Catering energy use & work processes (non-specialised) work flows & equipment use Procurement of raw materials Storage of raw materials Cool storage Cold Storage (refrigerated): (frozen): freezer, refri gerator, Freezer l arder Preparation of food-stuffs: Food processor/ bl ender Sl i cer Gri nder Whi sks Vacuum packi ng Food mi xer Cooking (heating): Oven ranges Sal amander gri l l s Fryers Toaster Environmental conditions: Ventilation (extractor fans) Combi nati on ovens Gri ddl es Water heating (boilers) Cleaning equipment: Speci al i ty ovens (e.g. Ri ce/ mul ti cookers Glass washing Dish Washing pi zza) Toasters Pasta cookers Steamers Mi crowaves Hot holding: Cooling: Bai ns Mari e Bl ast chi l l ers Chi l l ers Chi l l ers Soup kettl es Chi l l ed di spl ay cases Heated di spl ay cases Reheating: Combi nati on ovens Mi crowaves Hot Service: Cold Service: Bai ns Mari e Chi l l ers Soup kettl es Chi l l ed di spl ay cases Heated di spl ay cases Jui ce di spensers Food waste removal: dewateri ng uni ts countertop uni ts Cleaning equipment
  41. 41. Sub-metering would help tobetter determine whereinnovation needs to occurSource: CIBSE Energy efficiency in commercial kitchens, (US EPA)
  42. 42. Huge CO2 opportunity just aroundbest practices Easily visible oven thermometers equipment Cooking Induction hobs Automatic pan sensors Motor optimiser controllers on refrigeration plant Refrigeration equipment 7-day time switches Location of refrigeration equipment Plastic curtains and night blinds across the front of cold storage areas … Self closing devices on doors of fridges, freezers and cool rooms High efficiency refrigeration equipment Optimised design of extraction systems Automated ventilation control Kitchen services Variable speed drives (VSDs) on extractor fan motors Thermostatic radiator valves (TRVs) Thermostatic control of kitchen heating Lighting controls e.g. presence detection High efficiency lighting units Regular maintenance and servicing of energy consuming equipment Energy management Specifying high efficiency models when procuring equipment Implementation of energy management strategy and policy Formal energy management strategy and policy Metering, monitoring and targeting (MM&T) Innovative Behaviour Energy awareness raising campaign for all staff measures change Energy training for key staff Heat recovery from extraction systems to pre-heat water Heat recovery from dishwashers to pre-heat water 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Proportinon of sites at which measure has been implemented
  43. 43. Cooking related opportunities Potential for replacement of equipment on host sites Equipment Replacement Study Electric Combi Gas Combi Barriers, availability of suitable models, payback Combi/conventional Microwave/combi Barriers, availability of suitable models, oven (Merrychef) payback, service parameters Gas hobs Induction hobs Carbon savings, barriers, payback High temp sanitation Low temp sanitation Carbon savings, barriers, payback dishwasher dishwasher Combi with indirect Combi with direct Carbon savings, barriers, payback steam generation steam generation Equipment within LLLC (Least Carbon savings, barriers, payback scope of EuP studies Lifecycle cost on refrigeration, equipment) identified cooking, dishwashing in EuP studies Equipment within Energy Star rated Carbon savings, barriers, payback scope of Energy Star equipment ratings Equipment within ETL rated equipment Carbon savings, barriers, payback scope of ETL
  44. 44. General innovationopportunities Potential for Innovation Innovation NotesCombined messing at weekends (MOD) Identify case studySharing of energy savings and investment between Potential for trialcaterer and client to provide incentives and overcomebarriersCentralised heat recovery from refrigeration, dishwashing Potential for trialand extraction systems for local water heatingImproving capacity of low carbon cooking methods, such Trial if near marketas combined Microwave / Air impingement cookers andinduction hobs.Innovative technologies such as ultrasound dishwashing Probably too far from marketand magnetic refrigeration
  45. 45. Our site data indicatesvariances in energy useBusiness and Industry Site • City-centre office built in 2007 with 850 staff • Cafeteria, staff restaurant, hospitality • Wide range of equipment • Equipment owned by the client and utility bills are paid by them • Site has installed 100 sub-meters • 50,000 meals (main course, buffet or sandwich)
  46. 46. We found similar varianceswith other site types Host site Meals Served/year Benchmark CO2 CO2 Gas use % (kg)/meal (a) (kg)/meal (b) (b)B&I 50,000 0.30 2.31 13%Healthcare 120,000 0.54 1.92 42%MOD (JRM) 45,000 1.46 3.19 25%School 60,000 0.18 0.35 69%Weighted average 275,000 0.57 1.86(a) CIBSE 50: Energy Efficiency in Commercial Kitchens(b) Study estimates
  47. 47. Thank You…..…………Questions? Al-Karim.govindji@carbontrust.co.uk 020 7832 4610
  48. 48. Thank you to our Sponsors
  49. 49. INDUCTION EQUIPMENT HISTORY – HOW IT WORKS, WHERE IT‟S GOING…Stephen HobbsDirectorSignature FSE Ltd
  50. 50. Induction Equipment HistoryHow it works – Where is it going Introduction History of induction How does it work…? Past – Present – Future Benefits Summary
  51. 51. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingIntroduction to…Steve HobbsCompany director having some 25 years experience in thesupply of commercial catering equipment ….First Hotelympia exhibition 1986 – at which ‘inductioncooking technology’ was first presented as the future….
  52. 52. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingIntroduction to…Now some 25 years later this is the ‘first’ industry seminar towidely promote the use of induction…We’re a fast moving industry….In those 25 years ‘induction’ technology has changed anddeveloped but some ‘myths’ still remain….
  53. 53. Induction Equipment HistoryHow it works – Where is it going Introduction History of induction How does it work…? Past – Present – Future Benefits Summary
  54. 54. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingHistory of ‘induction’…Who is this…..?
  55. 55. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingHistory of ‘induction’…Michael Faraday – eminent chemistand physicist of the Victorian age(1791 – 1867)
  56. 56. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingHistory of ‘induction’…Faraday developed the idea andconcept of ‘induction’ technologywhilst trying to develop electricmotors….
  57. 57. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingHistory of ‘induction’…So induction is not a ‘new’technology and has been with us forsome 150+ years
  58. 58. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingHistory of ‘induction’…Initially as a concept ‘induction’ wasunder used until the mid/late 1940’sand 1950’s when started to becomeused in heavy industry such as….
  59. 59. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingHistory of ‘induction’…- industrial furnaces for rapid melting of metals for processing- traditional furnaces used coal / oil- new furnaces using more readily available electric….
  60. 60. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingHistory of ‘induction’…It was not until mid to late 1970’s thatthe concept of induction heating waswidely talked about for ‘cooking’…
  61. 61. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingHistory of ‘induction’…development of this ‘cooking’ conceptmainly driven from other Europeancountries where dependency onelectrical services was higher than inUK…
  62. 62. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingHistory of ‘induction’…In the early 1980’s the concept of‘induction’ cooking appliancesbecomes widely adopted by theprofessional foodservice industry….
  63. 63. Induction Equipment HistoryHow it works – Where is it going Introduction History of induction How does it work…? Past – Present – Future Benefits Summary
  64. 64. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingInduction Cooking…How does it work…?Basic principle developed by Faradayin 1840’s…. which is….
  65. 65. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingHow does it work…?When you pass an electric currentthrough a copper coil you create amagnetic field….
  66. 66. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingHow does it work…?When a ‘ferric’ material is in contactwith that magnetic field you‘magnetise’ the ‘ferric’ content…
  67. 67. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingHow does it work…?turning that ‘magnetic field’ on andoff you ‘magnetise’ and ‘de-magnetise’the ‘ferric’ content in the material….
  68. 68. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingHow does it work…?in turn this process creates ‘friction’within the ‘ferric’ material andgenerates heat….
  69. 69. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingHow does it work…?therefore the ‘heating’ process isgenerated within the ‘cooking vessel’– the quicker this ‘magnetic field’ isturned on and off…
  70. 70. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingHow does it work…?the quicker the ‘heating’ process…
  71. 71. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingPan Magnetic fieldElectroniccircuit CoilElectricalpower
  72. 72. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingHow does it work…?it’s not ‘magic’ it is a basic principleof physics…..
  73. 73. Induction Equipment HistoryHow it works – Where is it going Introduction History of induction How does it work…? Past – Present – Future Benefits Summary
  74. 74. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Past…..Launched to the ‘foodservice’industry in the mid / late 1980’s asthe ‘future’….
  75. 75. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Past…..at that stage hugely expensive as apiece of equipment and got a‘reputation’ as being unreliable andexpensive to maintain…
  76. 76. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Past…..this reputation is still in somepeoples minds, however…..
  77. 77. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Past…..since launched to the industry thecost of ‘component’ parts hasreduced and ‘reliability’ of thoseparts has increased…
  78. 78. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Past…..driving product pricing down andreliability up….
  79. 79. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Present…..there are now multiple products onthe market for different aspects of‘cooking’….
  80. 80. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Present…..Table top ‘plug & play’ type product…Plug in – 13amp use ‘anywhere’…single ring / multiple ring / wok /griddle / plancha / direct cooking…
  81. 81. ‘Plug & Play’ type product……
  82. 82. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Present…..Inbuilt and inset type product…Buffet presentation / show cooking /front of house presentation
  83. 83. ‘Front of house’ type product……
  84. 84. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Present…..Production type product…Integrated as part of main cookingsuite set up in modular or bespoketype product equipment….
  85. 85. ‘main production’ type product……
  86. 86. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Present…..Production type product…single ring / multi ring / multi zone /griddle / plancha cooking…
  87. 87. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Present…..Production type product…hot box delivery systems / mealdelivery systems…
  88. 88. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Future…..As with all technologies…Smaller… lighter… more powerful…
  89. 89. Induction Equipment HistoryHow it works – Where is it going Introduction History of induction How does it work…? Past – Present – Future Benefits Summary
  90. 90. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Benefits…..90% energy efficientTest – 2 litres of water @ 20:C to boiling point% of efficiency = energy consumed / time / heat generated
  91. 91. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it going Induction Time (min) Rate of Return (%) 90 60 55 508.18 9.5 9 4.46 Gas Solid Hot plate Radiant Induction
  92. 92. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Benefits…..90% energy efficientOnly works when a ‘cooking’ vessel is on contact with the ‘magnetic’ fieldonly uses power when needed
  93. 93. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Benefits…..90% energy efficientNo loss of energy through ‘heating’ the surrounding environmentNo loss of energy through noise or light generationReduction in extraction air volume needed
  94. 94. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Benefits…..Safety…..‘heat’ only generated in the ‘cooking’ vessel – therefore very low residualheat in the cooking topLow risk of ‘baking/burning’ on to the cooking top…. Easy clean….
  95. 95. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingInduction – Benefits…..Controllability and speed…..Due to it’s high efficiency it is very easy to control (ie aggressive boil tosimmer near instantaneous)Due to its high efficiency it is much ‘quicker’ saving time and energy…
  96. 96. Induction Equipment HistoryHow it works – Where is it going Introduction History of induction How does it work…? Past – Present – Future Benefits Summary
  97. 97. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingSummary…..History – not a ‘new’ conceptestablished for in excess of 150 years
  98. 98. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingSummary…..How does it work…. It’s not magic it’sa basic law of physics….
  99. 99. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingSummary…..Past…. Considered to be expensive tobuy / maintain / replace…
  100. 100. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingSummary…..Present…. Wide selection of‘professional’ product on the marketspecific to each operation itsrequired for….
  101. 101. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingSummary…..Future…. ‘You’ the chef / designer /specifier innovate – we as themanufacture will develop theproduct….
  102. 102. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingSummary…..Benefits….High energy efficiencyEasy to useSafety in all areasLower running costs
  103. 103. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingSummary…..Think of induction as you would thinkof a PC…..
  104. 104. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingSummary…..The induction appliance you buy isthe ‘hardware’ - the higherspecification of the product thehigher the result achievable….
  105. 105. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingSummary…..but the higher the price….. As withany ‘PC’ it’s not just the ‘hardware’that’s important – the end result isalso dependent on the quality ofthe…
  106. 106. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingSummary…..software…. with your inductionappliance consider both hardware(product) and software (cookingvessel)……
  107. 107. Induction Equipment History How it works – Where is it goingThank you for listening…..Stephen Hobbs, CFSPDirector – Signature FSE Ltd
  108. 108. Thank you to our Sponsors
  109. 109. THE IMPORTANCE OF INDUCTION COMPATIBLE COOKWAREMaurits DemeyereSenior PresidentDemeyere Cookware
  110. 110. Induction Cooking• Principle of induction cooking• Advantages of induction cooking• Cookware for induction cooking• Disadvantages of induction cooking• Discussion of different materials• Conclusion• Needed training, advice and tips : how to use cookware on induction hobs
  111. 111. Principle of Induction Cooking It is the only cooking system where the heating element is thebase of the cooking pot itself.All other systems are working with indirect heating - gas or oil: the hot fire is heating the base of the cooking pot - resistance coils: contact heat and radiation to the base - vitroceramic hotplates: contact heat and radiation - halogen / hi-light heating: radiation and contact Induction cooker and cooking pot are interrelated. They arebecoming like HARDWARE and SOFTWARE.( like a car and the tires . You can have the best car , if you buyunadapted tires the car will not work as you might expect )
  112. 112. Advantages of Induction Cooking Enormous flexibility Better safety in general Better safety for children Easier cleaning (important time gain in prof.kitchen) Lower temperatures in the (professional) kitchen and/or less energy use when kitchen is air-conditioned Much lower energy use compared to gas or electricity Easier adaptation of different diameters of cookware Computer controlled cooker Adaptive cooking possible – sensors – ControlInduc at 250°C or other temperatures
  113. 113. Cookware for Induction CookingFIRST CONDITION: MAGNETIC BASE  MATERIALS WHICH CANNOT BE USED - cupper - aluminium - casted aluminium - glas or heat resistant glas - normal non-magnetic stainless steel (18/8 or 18/10 - SAE304)  MATERIALS WHICH CAN BE USED - iron – steel or enameled steel - cast iron - magnetic stainless steel or 18/0 - SAE400 serie SECOND CONDITIONAim to make cookware which can go on all cooking systems:gas, electric coils, vitroceramic, hi-light, INCLUDINGINDUCTION.
  114. 114. Disadvantages of Induction Cooking Relatively expensive hobs. There are serious quality differences between different systems. Importance to know what you are buying depending on the specific needs :  -large caterer with large quantities to heat  -snack – bar with limited requirements to hobs and pots  -medium bristrot , brasserie or high class restaurant with preparations à la minute for each customer. Only specific (new) cookware can be used. Also there , the differences between the cookware are substantial.
  115. 115. Discussion of different materials ENAMELED STEEL - eventual chipping of the enamel layers - uneven bottom temperature CAST IRON - relatively good for induction, but not very high heat conductivity - heavy but keeping hot very well – ideal slow cooking. - enamel quality?? COOKING POT OF MAGNETIC STAINLESS STEEL ( 18/0) ( without thermoconductive base) - fast warming of water - very bad cooking: sticking – burning + deformation
  116. 116. Discussion of different materials (2)• COOKING POT OF STAINLESS STEEL SAE304 -Thermoconductive base ( or up to the edge ) of cupper (2 to 2,5 mm or 0,08” to 0,12”) or aluminium (or 4 to 5 mm or 0,16” to 0,2”) -Magnetic outer layer (or layers) of other magnetic stainless steel in the base or up to the edge. ( systems of 3 to 7 layers ) - types SAE 400 or 18/0 => Best solution for good speed and even heat distribution if correct materials, thicknesses, concepts and technologies are used. -for straight sided pots : ideal is heavy base with enough aluminum or cupper in between and sidewalls in pure stainless steel to keep heat inside . -for conical pots , frypans or skillets and woks best is multilayer material up to the edge with appropriate thickness of aluminum in between .
  117. 117. Discussion of different materials (3)• COOKING POTS OF ALUMINUM WITH MAGNETIC BASE Can be pure aluminum pots deep-drawn or can be casted aluminum pots. ( different thermal conductivity) A specific extra magnetic base is needed ,mostly of magnetic stainless steel of type SAE 400 or 18/0 .Problem: to apply a magnetic base on such a pot or pan, it is difficult to keep the bottom flat .Therefore the magnetic base diameter is mostly smaller than the flat base of the pot or pan.Negative effect to the magnetic permeability of the system in combination with the hob. The aluminum of the base radius of the pot is acting as a “screen”, lowering the possible power generated by a large to very large percentage. This means longer heating times , more power lost. Sometimes the very cheap aluminum pots in this type have holes in the magnetic base , which is adding to the loss , or they have heavy dents to stabilize, or the magnetic layer is too thin.
  118. 118. Discussion of different materials (4)• COOKING POTS OF CUPPER WITH MAGNETIC BASEIt is possible to make good heavy “cupper pots” with stainless steel ( 18/10 or SAE 304 ) on the inside of the pot, a magnetic base layer or a magnetic layer up to the edge. Nice but very expensive solution, that will not give any difference with a pot having a good “ equivalent” aluminum layer .In addition most restaurants stay away from cupper ( on the outside) because today the cleaning of cupper is too costly .Some “fake “ solutions, where there is a ( very thin ) layer of cupper between layers of aluminum , themselves between non magnetic layer of 18/10 or SAE 304 for the contact with the food and on the outside a magnetic stainless steel type SAE 400.They will not be different with an equivalent aluminum thickness which is lighter and less expensive
  119. 119. Conclusion For good cooking quality, a chef is expecting two very important factors that go together:  very even heat distribution for cooking real food and not only water.  very good speed and flexibility. Important notices : Cookware which is heating up water the fastest is not always the best. Cookware with very even heat distribution can also be too slow.
  120. 120. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF MATERIALS• Thermal conductivity ratio in cal. / cm.sec.C° • Stainless steel 18/8,18/10 or 18/0 0,05 • Copper 0,94 • Pure aluminum 0,53 • Casted aluminum 0,33 • Steel ( as used in enamel st.) 0,16 • Cast iron 0,12 • Glass 0,003
  121. 121. ADVICE NEEDED FROM HOB AND POT MANUFACTURER• To make a change from ( mostly ) gas into induction is a big adaptation.• Get a correct advice before you order the induction hobs.1)High power ( up to 9 or even 12 KW) is only interesting when you have to cook large pots 20 to 50 L• For most preparations 3,5 to 5 KW is more than enough.• Check the induction zones and how the generator activates them : large inductor covering whole zone or half zone; smaller inductors separately regulated or not.
  122. 122. ADVICE NEEDED FROM HOB AND POT MANUFACTURER • 2)Round inductors or square or rectangular inductors. • depend on main use. None of both should be excluded . Specialists are here to discuss. • our advice : whatever you buy : a system with more than one temperature sensor is better. Many have now 5 on an area of 28X28 cm. • Too many times inductors are selected based on the power, speed of heating water and the price which is totally irrelevant for many uses , especially of the “a la carte” restaurants.
  123. 123. ADVICE NEEDED FROM HOB AND POT MANUFACTURER• Get a correct advice before you order the pots and especially ... Don‟t wait until the last moment !!!!• 1)Order pots with a quality adapted to the type of induction hob.• 2)For straight sided pots : heavy base and sidewalls of stainless. ( give best efficiency )• 3)for conical designs as frypans , woks conical sauteuses : multilayer up to edge with correct thickness.• 4) manufacturers of hobs tell us that 90% of the problems arise from the inappropriate pots for the hob. – Poor magnetical base – Deformation of base – Some even deteriorate the induction generator(s).
  124. 124. IMPORTANT TIPS ON HOW TO USE POTS AND PANS• NEVER PLACE POTS OR PANS ONLY PARTLY OUTSIDE INDUCTION ZONE .• - Inductor pot• PART OF POT COULD OVERHEAT ON AREA WHERE HE IS ON INDUCTOR , EVEN MORE WHEN OTHER POT IS ON SAME INDUCTOR. IN MANY CASES NO TEMP. SENSOR WOULD BLOCK HEATING. BASE CAN BECOME OVER 600°C AND MELT AWAY OR CAN BE DESTROYED .•
  125. 125. IMPORTANT TIPS ON HOW TO USE POTS AND PANS• NEVER PUT A LONG HANDLE OVER AN INDUCTOR. ALWAYS HAVE THE LONG HANDLES OUTSIDE “ANY” INDUCTOR.• When a magnetic flux is active in an inductor, when a pot with enough magnetic material in the base or on the side is on the hob, the magnetic flux of a professional inductor , above the inductor ( even up to more than 10 cm away from the hob ) could heat NON MAGNETIC Material up to over 600°C within seconds !!!• The handle, even one made out of non-magnetic stainless steel 18/10 or other materials, can heat up when placed over an such an active inductor in a way that would burn the hand in the 3th degree when placed on the handle
  126. 126. IMPORTANT TIPS ON HOW TO USE POTS AND PANS• Have enough practical training of pots on an induction hob because most chefs are astonished about the heating speed ,especially when making delicate sauces and even more when frying a pan.• NEVER PLACE AN EMPTY POT , PAN OR WOK ON AN ACTIVE INDUCTOR. Within seconds the pot base or pan base can go over 400°C!!• WHEN SELECTING A HOB DON’T ACCEPT TO TEST ONLY POTS , TEST ALSO FRYPANS AND MAKE A SABAYONE OR SAUCE in a CONICAL SAUTEUSE! Especially check that it is possible to work with minimal energy levels . In some hobs of over 5000 or 9000 W there is no good low energy level regulation . Sometimes the lowest level still gives more than 1000W.
  127. 127. IMPORTANT TIPS ON HOW TO USE POTS AND PANS• The chef has to realize that it has to be possible to fine regulate at 300 W – 500 W or 1000 W , which are settings needed on an induction hob when the pan is warm and fish or meat has to be fried !!• To have only one position of the hob regulator ,when for example doing frying, is out of the question. You can start “medium high” or “high” but very fast a lower position is needed.• WE BELIEVE THAT ESPECIALLY FOR INDUCTION, HOB MANUFACTURERS AND POT MANUFACTURERS HAVE TO WORK TOGETHER IN PROMOTING BUT ESPECIALLY IN TRAINING THE NEW POTENTIAL USERS OR THE NEW USERS.THANKS – MAURITS DEMEYERE – 10 TH OF JUNE 2011.
  128. 128. Thanks you to our Sponsors
  129. 129. Demonstrations Followed by Lunch in the Exhibition Area
  130. 130. Thank you to our Sponsors
  131. 131. Closing RemarksKeith WarrenDirector, CESA
  132. 132. Thank you to our Sponsors

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