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Designing Social Media Engagement

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Everyone talks about social media "return on investment" -- but measuring your "return on engagement" (ROE) is what matters. Research and analysis prove that real social media engagement drives …

Everyone talks about social media "return on investment" -- but measuring your "return on engagement" (ROE) is what matters. Research and analysis prove that real social media engagement drives results. This presentation covers what kind of social media activities give the highest ROE, why it's so important, and how to use that information to design your programs and social media work. Case studies of organizations that have designed their online engagement to result in high ROE will also be highlighted. The presentation also reviews two approaches to measuring measuring Return on Engagement.

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  • Jodi, thanks so much for the comment - so glad you enjoyed it. I'd love to hear about whether or not you use the information to create a strategy for yourself or another.
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  • Great presentation and very focused on the social media engagement as an integrated marketing and publicity tool. Love it.
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  • Collaboration: Wikipedia, wikis, social bookmarking
    Multimedia: photo sharing, video sharing, art sharing, livecasting, podcasting
    Entertainment: virtual worlds, online gaming
    Reviews and opinions: product reviews, service or entertainment reviews (amazon, yelp epinions, eluna) and Q&A (yahoo answers, linkedin answers)
  • A is the org goals.  B is what the audience is interested in (or their goals, needs, etc.)  What's in the middle is generally where THE conversation topic is going to be.
  • Engage: passive activities such as visiting a site, reading the blog, playing a game
    Contribute: ideas, reviews, feedback
    Participate: within a group or fan page
    Create: create new content on a site or on their own about the site
  • Contributors = 80 more people talking than the engage set. Participators = 60 more than the engage set. Creators = 170 more
    Social media activity generated 2.5 times more conversations amongst creators than the engage set.


    http://www.slideshare.net/brandonmurphy/the-true-value-of-social-media-4267498
  • Engage: passive activities such as visiting a site, reading the blog, playing a game
    Contribute: ideas, reviews, feedback
    Participate: within a group or fan page
    Create: create new content on a site or on their own about the site
  • The notion of tie strength was first introduced in 1973 by Prof. Mark Granovetter in his seminal work: The Strength of Weak Ties. He identified four different components of tie strength. Time, Intensity, Trust, Reciprocity of four components.

    Trust and reciprocity are the two components that companies can leverage effectively for building a stronger customer relationship.
  • The notion of tie strength was first introduced in 1973 by Prof. Mark Granovetter in his seminal work: The Strength of Weak Ties. He identified four different components of tie strength.

    Trust and reciprocity are the two components that companies can leverage effectively for building a stronger customer relationship.

    Further reading: http://lithosphere.lithium.com/t5/Building-Community-the-Platform/My-Chapter-on-Relationships-The-R-in-Social-CRM/ba-p/19024
  • Let them help you by letting them help other customers and reward them properly. This will create a cycle of reciprocity can sustain itself. Aside from the added benefit of reducing support cost, implementing a co-creation strategy is one of is the most effective way to increase reciprocity between your brand and your customers.
  • SAR video and avi chai match campaign – didn’t just ask for $, were very social and friendly about it (biggest fundraiser on causes’ class got an ice cream party, kids with ipads at dropoff and pickup, tried F2F, but not only online…) Won a $25K award for innovation in fundraiser. Then got a donor who would give if every single alum gave, and they met the goal, excuse to have a convo with alumni.
  • SAR video and avi chai match campaign – didn’t just ask for $, were very social and friendly about it (biggest fundraiser on causes’ class got an ice cream party, kids with ipads at dropoff and pickup, tried F2F, but not only online…) Won a $25K award for innovation in fundraiser. Then got a donor who would give if every single alum gave, and they met the goal, excuse to have a convo with alumni.
  • Engage: passive activities such as visiting a site, reading the blog, playing a game
    Contribute: ideas, reviews, feedback
    Participate: within a group or fan page
    Create: create new content on a site or on their own about the site
  • .
  • Trust, reciprocity, engagement, participation, fans, and superfans in the Blue Key Tweetathon June 11, 2011
    33% of the Blue Key Champions at the time participated in the Tweetathon (13 participants, out of approximately 35/36 Champions)
  • How do you know it is working? Take time to ID what is working, getting participation level. Be willing to change measures and weights if need be
  • How do you know it is working? Take time to ID what is working, getting participation level. Be willing to change measures and weights if need be
  • Lilypad event – engages superfans IRL. Event takes online engagement further to that space of trust and engagement. Establishes the cause’s commitment to the fans, and trust amongst fans.
  • Lilypad event – engages superfans IRL. Event takes online engagement further to that space of trust and engagement. Establishes the cause’s commitment to the fans, and trust amongst fans.
  • Lilypad event – engages superfans IRL. Event takes online engagement further to that space of trust and engagement. Establishes the cause’s commitment to the fans, and trust amongst fans.
  • Lilypad event – engages superfans IRL. Event takes online engagement further to that space of trust and engagement. Establishes the cause’s commitment to the fans, and trust amongst fans.
  • Attention.  The amount of traffic to your content for a given period of time.  Similar to the standard web metrics of site visits and page/video views.
    Participation.  The extent to which users engage with your content in a channel.  Think blog comments, Facebook wall posts, YouTube ratings, or widget interactions.
    Authority.  Ala Technorati, the inbound links to your content – like trackbacks and inbound links to a blog post or sites linking to a YouTube video.
    Influence.  The size of the user base subscribed to your content.  For blogs, feed or email subscribers; followers on Twitter or Friendfeed; or fans of your Facebook page.

    http://www.beingpeterkim.com/2008/09/a-framework-for.html
    Jeff bulla: http://www.jeffbullas.com/2009/11/09/8-steps-to-demonstrate-positive-return-on-investment-for-social-media-marketing/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/moriza/2565606353/

Transcript

  • 1. It’s All About Engagement: Designing for Return on Engagement Presented by Debra Askanase Principal and Engagement Strategist Community Organizer 2.0 May 18, 2012
  • 2. Today’s conversation I. Hello social media II. Designing engagement III. Measuring Return on Engagement: Two approaches IV. Summary and takeaways
  • 3. I. Hello social media!
  • 4. Your URL isn’t just your website It’s your entire social web
  • 5. Communication Collaboration Multimedia Entertainment Reviews and Opinions Theworldofsocialmediatools
  • 6. A social business is a “networked nonprofit” Old Rules: Marcom focused New Rules: Socially focused Marketing Understand networks Communications Build relationships Multi-channel Connected Silos Integrated http://bit.ly/networkednp Additional resource: The Networked Nonprofit, by Allison Fine and Beth Kanter:
  • 7. You are NOT (primarily) …a community manager …a marketing professional …a development professional …a social media person Your title: Chief Conversation Officer
  • 8. http://www.flickr.com/photos/89165847@N00/5876255457/ II. Designing Engagement
  • 9. Design starts with SMART goals Specific Measurable Attainable Realistic Timely Design your social media activities to meet your org or programmatic goals: • resource awareness • membership • fundraising • activism • sign up for a program
  • 10. Diagram courtesy of Darim Online
  • 11. SocialMedia Engage Creates Trust Moveto Action The social media activity funnel
  • 12. Design engagement for highest ROE Create a video, message, tweet, blog post product about the company Become a fan Friend Follow Join Discuss Post reviews Give feedback Vote Contribute ideas Visit Watch Download Read Play Engage Contribute Participate Create Lowest to highest Return on Engagement * Based on http://www.slideshare.net/brandonmurphy/the-true-value-of-social-media-4267498
  • 13. Creators talked and proactively shared information about the brand the most. They also influenced buying decisions the most. Low-level engagement by itself did not produce significant ROE
  • 14. How they influenced purchasing Create a video, message, tweet, blog post product about the company Become a fan Friend Follow Join Discuss Post reviews Give feedback Vote Contribute ideas Visit Watch Download Read Play Engage Contribute Participate Create 20% 26% 32% 35% Percentage of each group that spurred a purchase
  • 15. Design is supported through a content strategy http://www.flickr.com/photos/venosdale/5974664030/sizes/l/in/photostream/ What content will support your engagement design? - Plot out engagement - Decide what design assets you’ll need - Figure out what content assets you’ll need - Create a content calendar
  • 16. SocialMedia Engage Creates Trust Moveto Action The social media activity funnel
  • 17. http://www.flickr.com/photos/57038784@N00/2215481444/ Companies can leverage trust and reciprocity to strengthen relationship ties *You will see more engagement if your organization is personal
  • 18. Trust: intimacy, mutual confiding Time: Amount of time spent together Reciprocity: amount of reciprocal services Intensity: Emotional intensity, sense of closeness Four components of tie strength
  • 19. Trust = authenticity, transparency
  • 20. Trust = authenticity, transparency Be the person behind the logo
  • 21. Trust = authenticity, transparency Be the person behind the logo
  • 22. Trust = authenticity, transparency Be the person behind the logo
  • 23. Reciprocity = co-creation
  • 24. Reciprocity = friends helping each other
  • 25. Reciprocity = friends helping each other
  • 26. Don’t forget offline supporting online http://www.causes.com/causes/601441-support-sar-academy/actions/1367612
  • 27. Don’t forget offline supporting online http://www.causes.com/causes/601441-support-sar-academy/actions/1367612
  • 28. ROE is fan engagement and trust Create a video, message, tweet, blog post product about the company Become a fan Friend Follow Join Discuss Post reviews Give feedback Vote Contribute ideas Visit Watch Download Read Play Engage Contribute Participate Create TRUST RECIPROCITY
  • 29. Summary: designing engagement Design different ways to become engaged online. Remember your content calendar and offline engagement! Be authentic and transparent: create trust and reciprocity Integrate co-creation into your engagement strategy Being a networked nonprofit makes it all easier!
  • 30. III. Measuring ROE: Two approaches http://www.flickr.com/photos/76283671@N00/184612846/in/photostream/
  • 31. Return on Engagement The metric tied to time and investment spent participating or interacting with other social media users, and in turn, what transpired that's worthy of measurement. *Hat tip to Brian Solis for the inspiration http://socialmediatoday.com/index.php?q=SMC/176801
  • 32. Know what you want to measure http://idealware.org/facebook_survey
  • 33. Approach 1: SMART Goal ROE Are your fans taking the action that you asked them to do? Are they signing up for activities? How many? From which social media channels? How does that compare with last month’s actions? Are they sharing content or talking about it on their own channels? Look at what actions you’ve designed and their effects on your SMART goals: what needs to be tweaked, what is not working?
  • 34. What indicates that your activities are working? • Sales/transactional • What indicators tell you you’re meeting your goal with the right tactics? Percent of member interest clicks from Facebook, amount of time on site from Linkedin visitors, number of inquiries from Twitter followers, etc. • Program involvement • What indicators tell you you’re meeting your goal with the right tactics? Example: increased % of program signup from Facebook. • Customer service • Volunteers/leadership • Personnel/hiring goals • Other …think about this for each goal, and how you are using social media
  • 35. Find online at http://bit.ly/SMARTgoalt racking
  • 36. Tweetathon: • 258 people/1,524 tweets with #bluekey • 169% increase in web traffic • led to >50% of key purchases that week Used with permission from USA for UNHCR SMART goal ROE: #bluekey Tweetathon
  • 37. Approach 2: ROE of Community Commitment How committed is the entire community you’ve built? Are you building a return on engagement? This is a relative metric. You want to compare it against itself, and against your competitors. Value = are you building a community of engaged advocates and stakeholders? Are you creating a sustainable fan base?
  • 38. Status measurements Engagement and activism measurements Numbers that are not in the context of social media conversations, nor reflect the impact of social network conversations Numbers that are in the context of social media conversations, and often reflect the impact of social network conversations Leading to ROE Used to measure ROE
  • 39. “Status” metrics of who is following you show the opportunity • Those that join but not comment are waiting to be activated • The number of those that “activate” on behalf of a brand grows yearly • “Slacktivism” is on the rise also… To rely on status metrics is to incorrectly understand your social media community It’s the potential, but not actual ROE
  • 40. Value of status metrics • Look at trends – what communities are growing, and why • Look at what’s not working – where is there stagnation, little growth • What trends are you seeing?
  • 41. Engagement and activism measurements: foster community These are contextual measurements that speak to how engaged the community is, how willing it is to take action, & your influence on the community => Converts to intended action http://www.flickr.com/photos/34086095@N05/4860818097/
  • 42. Where are the touch points = engagement points? • Facebook Page • Facebook conversation • Twitter follow • Twitter conversation • Twitter DM • Watch a YouTube video • Comment on a YouTube video • Follow company on LinkedIn • Talk with you on LinkedIn in within a group • Connect with you on Linkedin • Etc…
  • 43. Measuring the ROE of Community Commitment 1. Measure the commitment of your fans • Number of engaged fans/online community • Number that proactively talk about your org • Number that create (something you asked them to do) • Number that interact with others • Other measures relevant to your organization 2. Total number of engaged fans in each space divided by Total number of fans 3. Overall percentage = level of community commitment
  • 44. Tying it all together: Lily the Black Bear http://www.facebook.com/lily.the. black.bear http://www.communityorganizer20.com/2010/12/29/what-makes-lily-the-black-bear-so-incredible/
  • 45. http://www.communityorganizer20.com/2010/12/29/what-makes-lily-the-black-bear-so-
  • 46. http://www.communityorganizer20.com/2010/12/29/what-makes-lily-the-black-bear-so-incredible/
  • 47. http://www.communityorganizer20.com/2010/12/29/what-makes-lily-the-black-bear-so-incredible/
  • 48. Designing Lily’s Engagement on FB Engage: Watch videos on FB and Live cam on site, donate, read, visit site Contribute: give opinions and feedback, vote in contests, name the bear, etc. Participate: Facebook Friend, follow tweets, discuss and comment Create: Post their own photos, tweet proactively, comment proactively
  • 49. Designing Lily’s Engagement on FB Trust: you see the bears on webcam, know who’s posting to Facebook, meet the NABC at the Lilypad picnic Reciprocity: offer opinions and feedback, vote in contests, name the bear, fans encourage each other to participate Most importantly, Lily the Black Bear has a fully networked relationship with its stakeholders
  • 50. Tying it all together: Lily the Black Bear moves 143,633 Facebook fans to action Raised $359,597 from 53,502 fans in one year 17,916 votes to win the second Chase Community Giving Challenge Motivated 1793 supporters to donate $165,000 in Minnesota’s Give to the Max day 2011 (over 3,000 donors) Helped local Ely Esy public school win $20,000 in the K-12 America’s School Spirit challenge Helped Soudan Underground Mine State Park in MN win $200,000 in a 2010 parks challenge; activated 1.6 million voters (only 101,000 visited the park!)
  • 51. Tactics Overall Strategy Platforms Website Tactics Campaigns ROE
  • 52. Addendum: the larger spectrum of engagement you can measure Participation – comments, interactions, usage of widgets, @messages, shares, likes, posts, tags Degree of Authority – authoritative sites linking to your URLs, talking to about your content, organization, campaign Influence – size of user base subscribed to your content, ability to influence conversation, Klout/Twitalyzer, #RTs per post, hits to website from social sites Sentiment – how do people feel about you, % change Resource: http://www.beingpeterkim.com/2008/09/a-framework-for.html
  • 53. In summary 1. Know what you want to measure: Define your SMART goals 2. Integrate engagement theory into social media strategy design 3. Design along the ladder of engagement 4. What social media actions are working towards meeting your goals? 5. What is making the most difference? What is not? 6. Two social media measurement approaches: SMART goal ROE and community engagement metric 7. Evaluate: How can you tweak your engagement?
  • 54. What experience will you design? http://www.flickr.com/photos/moriza/2565606353/
  • 55. I’m always available to answer follow-up questions! Email: debra@communityorganizer20.com Website: communityorganizer20.com Blog: http://communityorganizer20.com Linkedin: linked.com/in/debraaskanase Twitter: @askDebra Other slides: slideshare.net/debask Telephone: (617) 682-2977