414   Web 2.0  in schools leadership and policies
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  • CosN conducted a national survey t o investigate the beliefs, perspectives and experiences of district level administrators (superintendents, district curriculum directors and technology directors) pertaining to the implication of Web 2.0 for teaching and learning in our schools. District administrators said that Web 2.0 was generally a positive influence on students’ lives, especially on their communication skills, the quality of their schoolwork, and interests outside of school. Two exceptions were students exercise/physical conditioning and students’ behavior in schools.
  • Top three priorities for improving student learning through the use of Web 2.0: Keeping students interested and engaged in school. Meeting the needs of different kinds of learners Developing critical thinking skills. Curriculum directors identified four key content areas that they predicted would be most positively impacted by Web 2.0: social studies, writing, science, and reading. *Other options of lower priority to respondents and not listed above include: offer opportunities for students to create innovative products; build the capacity of students to function successfully on teams; provide opportunities for all students to voice ideas; document student progress over time (e.g., performance assessment); provide opportunities for community-based projects.
  • 60% of district administrators believe that student use of Web 2.0 should be limited to participation on approved educational websites.
  • Concern- balancing the responsibility and liability associated with Internet safety with the potential learning opportunities of Web 2.0 and the need to prepare students to thrive in the coming Web 3.0 world. There is a significant nervousness about Web 2.0 in schools, serious discussions taking place about potential uses and abuse, and early discussions about how Web 2.0 might be used to the learning advantage of student. The policies fall into formal and informal. Formal policies are enacted through a board policy; official decisions formally communicated through an acceptable user policy that students and/or parents must sign prior to use; a student handbook; official memos that regulate specific uses of Web 2.0; o a written procedure guiding the deployment and operation of a filtering system.
  • Technology issues were identified as critical barriers to restructuring. The issues include: a lack of adequate access to technology; a lack of reliable and robust Internet access; the continuing need for high-quality, ongoing professional development on effective uses of Web 2.0; and, a new mindset for embracing Web 2.0. Sample comments addressing each barrier follow.
  • 48% said some use in teaching and learning was present
  • Technology issues were identified as critical barriers to restructuring. The issues include: a lack of adequate access to technology; a lack of reliable and robust Internet access; the continuing need for high-quality, ongoing professional development on effective uses of Web 2.0; and, a new mindset for embracing Web 2.0. Sample comments addressing each barrier follow.
  • The learning opportunities that digital media provide are generally more available to kids outside of schools rather than in them. To be competitive and responsible U.S. youth must graduate from school ready to thrive in those realities, one of which is the participatory culture of Web 2.0 technologies. Innovation and change in society is outpacing K-12 education’s current capacity for innovation. The call is immediate and long-term. Urgency to ensure that educators are effectively tapping the potential of participatory environments inherent in Web 2.0. Long-term in the need to use Web 2.0 to establish school cultures that continuously promote and embrace innovations that advance deep, authentic learning.   While school administrators generally realize that digital media can have benefits for learning, many districts have been wary of digital media – especially social networking and other participatory media – and in many instances are banning or severely restricting use.   Schools need help in formulating policies and in implementing leadership practices that enable the effective use of digital media in support of learning.   The most effective use of digital media in schools occurs when participatory and collaborative learning are enmeshed in the culture of the school rather than when digital media are simply introduced in classroom settings with minimal planning.   Schools which have good and widespread access to digital media provide access to learning resources that are otherwise not accessible to students.

414 Web 2.0 in schools leadership and policies Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Web 2.0 in Schools: Leadership & Policy Keith R. Krueger, CEO, CoSN
  • 2. CoSN Mission MISSION Empowering K-12 district technology leaders to use technology strategically to improve teaching and learning The primary challenge we face in using technology effectively in education is human, not technical. For that reason, CoSN focuses on Leadership and Policy .
  • 3. Key Technology Trends
    • Time-to-Adoption: One Year or Less
    • Collaborative Environments
    • Online Communication Tools
    • Time-to-Adoption: Two to Three Years
      • Mobiles
      • Cloud Computing
      • Time-to-Adoption: Four to Five Years
      • Smart Objects
      • The Personal Web
  • 4. Web 2.0 in Schools: Goal
    • Help district level administrators successfully deal with the policy and leadership challenges, as well as the opportunities presented by Web 2.0 and the emergence of “participatory culture”.
  • 5. Web 2.0 Definition Online application that uses the World Wide Web (www) as a platform and allows for participatory involvement, collaboration, and interactions among users. Web 2.0 is also characterized by the creation and sharing of intellectual and social resources by end users.
  • 6. Promise 73 % of the nation’s district administrators see the educational significance of Web 2.0 tools in the American classroom. Significant opportunities for improving curricula and teaching materials in social studies, writing, science and reading at all grade levels.
  • 7. Promise: Students’ Lives District administrators rate the effect of Web 2.0 applications on student’s life and education.
  • 8. Promise: Teaching & Learning
    • Top three priorities for improving student learning through the use of Web 2.0
      • Keeping students interested and engaged
      • Meeting the needs of different kinds of learners
      • Developing critical thinking skills
  • 9. Reality: Access 70% school districts ban social networking 72% school districts ban chat rooms Most other Web 2.0 tools are allowed (e.g., blogging, wikis, sound files, visual media, posting messages, virtual worlds, interactive games, polls/surveys, etc.)
  • 10. Reality: Policies
    • Internet safety . Educators struggling to balance keeping students safe while realizing the potential of Web 2.0
      • Over 53% agreed that Web 2.0 has caused district policy makers to become nervous about allowing student access.
      • Only 3% school districts have formal policies adopted specifically to address Web 2.0
  • 11. Reality: Not experienced users Percentage of Superintendents indicating the highest level of use he/she makes of specific Web 2.0 applications n=777 Superintendents
  • 12.
      • The use of these tools in American classrooms remains the province of individual pioneering classrooms .
      • 56% reported that Web 2.0 applications have not yet been integrated within the curriculum.
    Reality: Practice Web 2.0 is outpacing the capacity of K-12 education to innovate.
  • 13. Reality: Barriers to Use
    • School district are more focused on the challenges of Web 2.0 than on restructuring to leverage Web 2.0 for learning.
    • Many district administrators said that educators in their districts were not sufficiently familiar with Web 2.0 to understand it fully, much less ready to redesign schooling.
  • 14. Summary
    • District administrators see the educational significance of Web 2.0 of
    • They see the promise of Web 2.0 to energize learning and equip students with the skills they will need in life.
    • Yet, the reality is that schools are struggling with the how to make effective use of Web 2.0 as a vital element of the learning environment.
  • 15. Other US Perspectives
    • Craig Wacker, John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
    • Fred Morton, Director, Maggie Walker Governor’s School for Government and International Studies
    • Sheryl Abshire, Calcasieu Parish Public Schools, LA
  • 16.
    • In times of change, learners inherit the Earth; while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists .
    • Eric Hoffer
    • www.cosn.org/web20