Nutrition, Physical Activity And Cancer Prevention Cirignano
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2nd Annual DCC Retreat

2nd Annual DCC Retreat

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Nutrition, Physical Activity And Cancer Prevention Cirignano Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Nutrition, Physical Activity & Cancer Prevention Update Sherri Cirignano, MS, RD, LDN Rutgers University
  • 2. Objectives
    • Promote awareness of the link between nutrition, physical activity and cancer prevention
    • Understand the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) Recommendations
    • Identify ways to promote client personal weight, physical activity and/or nutrition goals
  • 3. Controllable Causes of Cancer
    • Lifestyle Choices
    • Weight
    • Physical Activity
    • Eating Habits
    • Tobacco Use WCRF/AICR, 2007
  • 4. AICR Recommendations for Cancer Prevention WCRF/AICR,2007
  • 5. AICR Recommendation #1
    • Be as lean as possible without becoming underweight. WCRF/AICR 2007
  • 6. Weight Maintenance Tops the List
    • Evidence for increased risk
        • Body fatness  Convincing for esophageal, pancreas, colorectal, breast (post), endometrium, kidney; Probable for gallbladder
        • Abdominal fatness  Convincing for colorectal; Probable pancreas, breast (post), endometrium
        • Adult weight gain  Probable for breast (post)
    • Balance caloric intake with physical activity
    • Work towards a healthy BMI (18.5-24.9) and waist measurement (<31.5” for women/<37” for men)
      • WCRF/AICR, 2007
      • USDA
  • 7. Tips to Make it Happen!
    • Make it goal-oriented
    • Make it safe
    • Make it positive
    • Make it Happen! One step at a time
  • 8. AICR Recommendation #2
    • Be physically active for at least 30 minutes each day.
      • WCRF/AICR, 2007
  • 9. Get Moving-Get Healthy!
    • Evidence for decreased risk
      • Convincing  for colon cancer
      • Probable  for breast (post), endometrium
      • Limited-suggestive  for lung, pancreas, breast (pre)
    • Adults:
      • Engage in moderate – vigorous activity for 30-60 minutes every day / Limit sedentary activities
      • WCRF/AICR, 2007
    • Children and Adolescents:
      • Engage in 1 hour (60 minutes) or more of physical activity every day / Limit sedentary activities
      • USDHHS
  • 10. Tips to Make it Happen!
    • Make it safe
    • Make it goal-focused
    • Make it easy
    • Make it fun
    • Make it Happen! Every day
  • 11. AICR Nutrition Recommendations
  • 12. AICR Recommendation #3
    • Avoid sugary drinks. Limit consumption of energy-dense foods.
    • Evidence probable for increased risk of weight gain, overweight and obesity
    • Drink mostly water and up to one glass of fruit juice per day
    • Choose nutrient-rich foods more often
    • Consume fast foods sparingly, if at all
      • WCRF/AICR, 2007
  • 13. AICR Recommendation #4
    • Eat more of a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes.
    • WCRF/AICR, 2007
  • 14. Cancer Prevention Benefits of Non-Starchy Vegetables
    • Evidence probable for a decreased risk of mouth, pharynx, larynx, esophageal, stomach and colorectal cancers
    • Non-starchy vegetables includes
      • Cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cabbage)
      • Root vegetables (carrots, beets, turnips)
      • Allium vegetables (garlic, leeks, shallots)
      • Green leafy vegetables (collard and turnip greens)
      • WCRF/AICR,2007
  • 15. Cancer Prevention Benefits of Fruit
    • Evidence for decreased risk
      • Probable for mouth, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, lung, stomach
      • Limited-suggestive for nasopharynx, pancreas, liver, colorectum
    • Includes
      • Citrus fruits
      • General fruits including apples, watermelon, guava and apricots
      • WCRF/AICR,2007
  • 16. More Matters!
    • Eat a variety of vegetables and fruits
    • Include vegetables and fruits at meals and snacks
    • Limit fried and starchy vegetables
    • Choose 100% juice for fruit or vegetable juices
      • WCRF/AICR, 2007
      • Fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org
  • 17. Make Half Your Grains Whole
    • Evidence for decreased risk
      • Probable for colorectal due to fiber
    • Choose whole grains
      • Aim for 3 ounces each day
      • Include whole grain rice, bread, pasta and cereals
      • Limit refined grains
      • WCRF/AICR,2007
      • www.health.gov
  • 18. Legumes
    • Evidence for decreased risk
      • Probable for colorectal due to dietary fiber
      • Limited-suggestive for stomach, prostate due to legumes
    • Kidney, black & soy beans, chickpeas and lentils
    • Excellent source of plant protein & fiber
    • Aim for three cups/week
      • www.mypyramid.gov
      • WCRF/AICR, 2007
  • 19. The New American Plate www.aicr.org
      • Learn More
  • 20. Tips to Make it Happen!
    • Make it easy
    • Make it different
    • Make it fun
    • Make it Happen! With one food type at a time
  • 21. AICR Recommendation #5
    • Limit consumption of red meats and avoid processed meats.
    WCRF/AICR,2007
  • 22. Recommendation #5 Specifics
    • Evidence for increased risk with regard to red meat and processed meat
      • Convincing for colorectum
    • Recommendations:
      • Limit red meat to less than 18 oz. each week
        • Includes beef, pork and lamb
      • Have little, if any, processed meat
        • Includes bacon, salami, hot dogs, sausages
        • WCRF/AICR,2007
  • 23. Making Protein Choices
    • Choose fish, poultry, or beans as an alternative to beef, pork, and lamb
    • When eating meat, select lean cuts and smaller portions
    • Bake, broil, or poach meat, rather than frying or charbroiling
    • Save processed meats for special occasions only
      • Learn More
      • WCRF/AICR,2007
  • 24. Grilling
    • Evidence for increased risk is limited-suggestive for stomach cancer
    • For safer grilling:
      • Marinate and/or pre-cook meats before grilling
      • Use lean meats
      • Remove charred meat portions
      • Grill vegetables and fruits
      • AICR
  • 25. AICR Recommendation #6
    • Limit consumption of salty foods and foods processed with salt.
    • Probable evidence for increased risk of stomach cancer
    • Intake of sodium should be less than 2400mg per day
    • Avoid processed foods
    • Check food labels
    • Gradually reduce the amount of salt added
    • Use spices, herbs or lemon instead of salt
      • WCRF/AICR,2007
  • 26. Review of Diet Recommendations
    • Avoid sugary drinks and limit energy- dense foods
    • Eat more of a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes
    • Limit consumption of red meats and avoid processed meats
    • Limit consumption of salty foods and foods processed with salt
      • WCRF/AICR,2007
  • 27. AICR Recommendation #7
    • If consumed at all, limit alcoholic drinks to 2 for men and 1 for women a day.
      • WCRF/AICR,2007
  • 28. Limit Alcohol
    • Evidence for increased risk
      • Convincing for mouth, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, colorectal (men), breast (pre & post)
      • Probable for colorectal (women) and liver
    • Limit alcohol consumption
      • One drink = 12 ounces beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80 proof spirits
      • Alternate between alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks and dilute alcoholic drinks
      • Aim to keep a few nights a week alcohol-free
      • WCRF/AICR,2007
    • Water is the recommended beverage of choice
      • Am J Clin Nutr 2006;83:529-542
  • 29. AICR Recommendation #8
    • Don’t use supplements to protect against cancer.
    • Evidence for increased risk
      • Convincing w/beta-carotene and lung cancer
    • The best source of nutrients is food and drink
    • Exceptions:
      • Pregnant women & nursing mothers
      • Children & adolescents
      • Older adults
      • WCRF/AICR,2007
  • 30. AICR Recommendation #9
    • It’s best for mothers to breastfeed exclusively for up to six months.
    • Protective to moms against breast cancer
      • Evidence for lactation is convincing for decreased risk of breast cancer (pre & post)
    • Decreases the risk of over- weight and obesity in children
      • Evidence for weight gain, overweight and obesity is probable
      • WCRF/AICR,2007
  • 31. AICR Recommendation #10
    • After treatment, cancer survivors should follow the recommendations for cancer prevention.
    • Seek professional advice when in treatment
    • Follow prevention recommendations to reduce risk of recurrence
      • WCRF/AICR,2007
  • 32. And, always remember – do not smoke or chew tobacco
  • 33.
    • Aim to be a healthy weight throughout life
    • Be physically active everyday in any way for 30 minutes or more
    • Eat a variety of healthful foods, with a focus on plant foods
    • Limit consumption of alcoholic beverages
    • Avoid tobacco use and exposure
      • WCRF/AICR,2007
    The Power of Prevention
  • 34. Nutrition, Physical Activity & Cancer:
    • This presentation was created by
    • Family & Community Health Sciences of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
    • Authored by: Sherri Cirignano, MS, RD, LDN
    • cirignano@njaes.rutgers.edu
    • 2009
    The Power of Prevention