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Anglicanism and the Western Christian Tradition (c) Anglican Centre in Rome 09.2010
 

Anglicanism and the Western Christian Tradition (c) Anglican Centre in Rome 09.2010

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First Part of the Presentation based on Displays at the 2002 Exhibition at the Vatican Museum and Norwich Cathedral, charting the communion of origins and shared history of the Church of England and ...

First Part of the Presentation based on Displays at the 2002 Exhibition at the Vatican Museum and Norwich Cathedral, charting the communion of origins and shared history of the Church of England and the Latin Catholic Church, their life together in contemporary Britain and their hopes for full communion.

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    Anglicanism and the Western Christian Tradition (c) Anglican Centre in Rome 09.2010 Anglicanism and the Western Christian Tradition (c) Anglican Centre in Rome 09.2010 Presentation Transcript

    • Welcome toAnglicanism and the Western Christian Tradition Continuity and Change Click mouse or space bar to continue
    • Anglicanism and the Western Christian Tradition Continuity and Change A presentation based upon the exhibition produced by the Dean and Chapter of Norwich Cathedral in conjunction with the British Ambassador to the Holy See and hosted in the Vatican Museums in 2002, now updated and made available electronically by the Anglican Centre in Rome.The Anglican Centre in Rome Norwich Cathedral
    • The 2002 Exhibition Temporary imageThe Exhibition was held in the Salone Sistino of the Vatican Museums at the invitation of the Roman Catholic Church.
    • Continuity and Change Despite more than four hundred years of separation since the Reformation, Anglicans remain part of the Western Christian tradition.Living apart has meant, however, that there has been change as well as continuity.Here the diocese of Norwich is used as a specific case study to help unfold a rich and intriguing history.
    • Contents click on any heading to go to the relevant page 1.Anglicanism and the Western Christian Tradition: Continuity and Change 2.The Re-evangelisation of England 3.The Foundations of the Church in England 4.The Consolidation of Norman Power 5.The English Parish Church 6.The Benedictines 7.A School of the Lord’s Service 8.The Break with Rome 9.The English Reformation 10.The Catholic Restoration 11.The Elizabethan Settlement 12.Catholic Recusancy 13.The Civil War 14.Non-conformity or Protestant Dissent 15.Religious Freedom in a Changing World 16.The Evangelical and Catholic Revival 17.The Church of England and the Crown 18.The Emergence of a World Communion 19.Ecumenism – the Search for Unity 20.Growing Together in Worship 21.Church and Society 22.Cathedrals Today Acknowledgements and Copyright Copyright-holders, where they have been traced, have given their permission for the use of images solely in this presentation. Images should not be reproduced without obtaining permission from the copyright-holders.
    • Anglicanism and the Western Christian TraditionContinuity & Change‘Anglicanism’, as it has come to be known, traces its roots to thechurch in England which parted from the jurisdiction of the Bishop ofRome during the sixteenth century European Reformation.Despite more than four hundred years of separation, Anglicansremain part of the Western Christian tradition.Living apart has meant, however, that there has been change as wellas continuity.The ancient dioceses of the Church of England reflect this in differentways. Here the diocese of Norwich is used as a specific case studyto help unfold a rich and intriguing history. This presentation seeks totell something of this story. Return home
    • The Re-evangelisation of EnglandThe martyrdom of St Alban is evidencethat there were Christians in England inthe third century. Later Anglo-Saxoninvasions helped paganism to reassertitself after the departure of the Romanlegions. The Martyrdom of St Alban c305 Return home
    • The Re-evangelisation of EnglandThe country was re-evangelised in thenorth from Iona by Irish-Celtic monks, ledby St Aidan. In the south, missionariescame from Rome sent by Pope Gregorythe Great and led by St Augustine. In EastAnglia, St Fursey from Ireland and St Felix,a Burgundian bishop sent fromCanterbury, spearheaded a similar ‘dual The pectoral cross found with St Cuthbert’s relics in Durhammission’ in 635 Bottom: Christians at Prayer. Wall decoration atNext slide: Lullingstone Roman Villa, Kent10th Century Irish High Cross from ClonmacnoiseSt Felix, Apostle of East Anglia Return home
    • ‘Cross of the Scriptures’, a 10th Century Irish High Cross from Clonmacnoise, IrelandSt Felix, Apostle of East Anglia. The 12thcentury relief in Norwich Cathedral Return home
    • The Foundations of the Church in EnglandTheodore of Tarsus became Archbishop ofCanterbury in 668. He inherited a Churchwith seven huge dioceses each servingone of the principal Anglo-Saxonkingdoms. To bring order and structure tothe English Church he created smallerdioceses. In 673 he divided the East North Elmham, the site of the 10th century Cathedral of East AngliaAnglian see with bishops based atFelixstowe and Elmham. Although hisoverall plans did not come to full fruition inhis lifetime, he had laid good foundations.By 1066 there were fifteen dioceses.Norfolk and Suffolk, however, were onceagain a single diocese based on NorthElmham. Stones from North Elmham provide a link with the first Bishop’s Throne Return home
    • St Luke from the GospelA fragment from the decrees of a Council Book of St Augustineof Bishops held at Clofesho in 747 Background: North Elham, the site of the 10th century Cathedral of East Anglia Return home
    • The Consolidation of Norman PowerThe conquest of England by William ofNormandy drew the country closer to theContinent and its cultural and religiousinfluences. Norman policy was to centrepower on the principal commercial cities.To this end cathedrals were re-located:Selsey gave place to Chichester,Dorchester to Lincoln, and The Bayeux Tapestry – the Normans land in England, 1066Crediton to Exeter. Return home
    • The Consolidation of Norman PowerBishop Herfast moved the East Angliansee from Elmham to Thetford.Finally, Herbert de Losinga, a Benedictinebishop from Normandy, built his cathedralat Norwich in 1096 alongside the newNorman castle.Apart from the Abbey at Bury St Edmunds,his cathedral was the greatest church inEast Anglia.Next slide:The medieval city of Norwich dominated by Castle and Cathedral Return home
    • The medieval city of Norwich dominated by Castle and Cathedral Return home
    • The English ParishCentral churches staffed by secular ormonastic clergy provided a focus formission and ministry amongst the smallertribal communities of Anglo-SaxonEngland.In Norman times the manor became thelocal administrative unit. Churches werebuilt by monastic communities, local lordsand others to serve the people living ontheir estates The wealth of the wool trade: St Mary’s Worstead, Norfolk Return home
    • The English ParishOver the centuries wealthy parishionersbeautified and enlarged their churches andleft fine monuments to their name.In East Anglia mediaeval trade withEurope, particularly in wool, generatedconsiderable wealth making Norwich thesecond city in the land. The alabaster tomb of Lord and Lady Bardolph (1441), benefactors of Dennington Church, Suffolk A typical English parish church interior: SS Peter and Paul, Salle in Norfolk Return home
    • The BenedictinesThe new cathedral at Norwich was staffedby a community of Benedictine monks.Cathedrals in the care of religiouscommunities were unique to England. Thistradition had been inherited from theAnglo-Saxon Church. The bishop was theAbbot, but the Prior administered thecathedral and the monastic community.Canterbury, Winchester and Durham wereamong those served by monasticcommunities and many of the greatchurchmen of the day, such as Lanfrancand Anselm, were monks. St Benedict (and St Leonard) from the pulpit at Horsham St Faith, Norfolk. 15th century Return home
    • The BenedictinesAt Norwich the bishop and his householdlived north of the cathedral, while themonastic buildings lay to the south. The largest surviving monastic cloisterThe Prior’s door, Norwich Cathedral in England, Norwich Cathedral Return home
    • A School of the Lord’s Service The 12th centuryThe Rule of St Benedict envisaged ‘a monastic scribeschool of learning in the Lord’s service’ Eadwine at workundergirded by prayer, manual work andhospitality.Able Norwich monks studied at Oxford andone, Adam Easton, served in the Romancuria and was created cardinal in 1381 byPope Urban VI.The daily round of services – the Opus Dei– was the main work of the community. Monks in choir, from a late medieval Psalter Return home
    • A School of the Lord’s ServiceFollowing the Reformation in 1549Archbishop Cranmer transposed themonastic hours to form the Prayer Bookoffices of Mattins and Evensong.The present cathedral foundation singsEvensong each day, continuing a traditionalmost unbroken since the Reformation. The choir of Norwich Cathedral sing in the medieval monks’ stalls, Return home
    • The Break with Rome Henry VIIIWhen Henry VIII wrote a defence of the Studio of Hans Holbein theSeven Sacraments in 1521, Pope Leo X Younger, from the Castleawarded him the title ‘Defender of the Howard CollectionFaith’.A series of parliamentary enactmentsculminated in the Act of Supremacy(1534) declaring Henry supreme head ofthe English Church.Nevertheless determined to annul his firstmarriage with or without Papal sanction,Henry appointed an able scholar, ThomasCranmer, Archbishop of Canterbury. The Great Bible in English, ordered by Henry VIII to be set up in all churches, Return home
    • The Break with RomeThe resistance of leading churchmen likeBishop John Fisher and Henry’s formerChancellor, Thomas More, resulted in their West front,execution. Castle AcreThe king proceeded to dissolve themonasteries, secularising their property,but continued to resist doctrinal reform. A surviving archway from the medieval priory at Walsingham, Norfolk Return home
    • The English ReformationReligious change gained momentum witha series of parliamentary statutes underthe boy-king Edward VI. By now Cranmer,with support from the king and others,favoured more radical reform oncontinental lines. Iconoclasm was licensed,the chantries were abolished. The destruction of images. The defaced rood screen of Beeston-next-Milehan, Norfolk.De la Warr Chantry, Boxgrove Priorry Next slide: The destruction of images: cloister boss Return home
    • The destruction of images: a mutilated cloister boss, Norwich Cathedral Return home
    • The English ReformationCranmer’s vernacular liturgical projectsresulted in the first English Prayer Booksof 1549 and 1552.Despite Cranmer’s increasingly protestantintentions, particularly with regard toeucharistic doctrine, the new liturgy stillretained much material from the medievalservice books, and was, by continentalprotestant standards, suspiciously catholic.Now reshaped, the services of the Churchinvited fuller participation by the laity. The frontispiece of the Book of Common Prayer,1552 Return home
    • The Catholic RestorationEdward VI’s death in 1553 led to theaccession of the devoutly Catholic Mary,and a policy of restoring Catholicism toEngland.Cranmer, with other key reformers, wasburned at the stake. There were many martyrs on both sides of the religious divide. Here, Archbishop Cranmer is burnt at the stake. Engravng from Foxe’s Book of Martyrs Return home
    • The Elizabethan SettlementThe catholic restoration collapsed withMary’s death (1558) and the accession ofher half-sister, Elizabeth, who wasdetermined to pursue a less radicalProtestantism.The Act of Supremacy (1559) againstwhich all the bishops present voted,made the Queen supreme governor ofthe Church in England. Elizabeth I The Act of Supremacy National Archives Return home
    • The Elizabethan SettlementPuritans hoped for more sweeping reform.But in the search for identity, exemplified inthe writings of Richard Hooker and others,the newly emerging Church of Englandpreserved many aspects of the “oldreligion”, including the three-fold ministry ofbishops, priests and deacons. Richard HookerNext slide:A post-Reformation church interior Return home
    • The Elizabethan Settlement A post-Reformation church interior reflects the new emphasis on Scripture and preaching. Bylaugh Church, Norfolk Return home
    • Continuing Catholicism - RecusancyElizabeth’sexcommunication, byPope Pius V in 1570,further polarised hersubjects.His Bull, Regnans inExcelsis, absolvedCatholics of theirallegiance to theQueen, necessitatingonce again a new andpolitical choicebetween loyalty to theCrown and loyalty to The Gunpowder Plot conspirators who attempted to blow up Parliament in 1605.the Pope. © National Portrait Gallery, London Return home
    • Continuing Catholicism - RecusancyCatholics showed much courage in livingout their faith. Seminaries such as Douai inFrance and the Venerable English Collegein Rome trained priests for clandestineservice in England. Those caught weretortured and executed. Despite periodicoutbursts of persecution, there was a gooddeal of co-existence and Catholicismremained strong, notably in some greataristocratic houses. A priest’s hole. Harvington Hall, WorcestershireNext slide:The houses of Catholic recusant families Return home
    • Continuing Catholicism - RecusancyThe houses of catholic recusant families:Oxburgh Hall , Norfolk (top)Stonor Park, Oxfordshire (right) Return home
    • 1642 – 1651 The Civil WarArchbishop William Laud, supported byKing Charles I, who was married to theCatholic Henrietta Maria, emphasisedthe sacramental value of the Church ofEngland and its continuity with itscatholic past.This caused fierce opposition, as didthe King’s disregard for Parliament andhis belief in a divine right to rule. Civil The execution of Charles I at thewar resulted. Both Archbishop Laud Banqueting House, Westminster, 1649and Charles were executed. © National Portrait Gallery, LondonEpiscopacy was abolished and for adecade the Church of England formallybecame Presbyterian. Return home
    • 1642 – 1651 The Civil WarBut a new age did not dawn and in 1660the monarchy was restored, episcopacyre-established and the Prayer Bookrevised. The return of Charles II as king in 1660. Return home
    • Non-conformity or Protestant DissentThe Act of Uniformity in1662 madedissenters of those radical Protestants whorefused to conform to the Church ofEngland.Their varying views on matters of doctrineand church government created differentcommunities which eventually became Oulton Congregational Church, Norfolkknown as Baptist, Congregationalist andQuaker.Next slide:John Bunyan in prison Return home
    • John Bunyan, author of Pilgrim’s Progress, in Bedford Prison,from a window in the Bunyan Meeting Free Church, Bedford Return home
    • Non-conformity or Protestant DissentIn the eighteenth century John Wesley, apriest of the Church of England, developedan itinerant preaching ministry challenginghis hearers to live by ‘scriptural holiness’.His converts were known as Methodistsand formed societies which eventuallybroke away from the Established Church. John Wesley preaching from his father’s tomb in Epworth Return home
    • Religious Freedom in a Changing WorldFrom the end of the 17th Century a newspirit of toleration began to grow in Englishsociety. Eventually this led to the repeal ofthe Test and Corporation Acts in 1828,which had restricted the civil rights of Non-Conformists. In 1829 the CatholicEmancipation Act followed. Nicholas Wiseman, first Archbishop of Westminster.In 1850 the Roman Catholic hierarchy wasrestored, dioceses set up, and NicholasWiseman appointed first Archbishop ofWestminster. Westminster Cathedral, started in 1895 Return home
    • Religious Freedom in a Changing WorldAt the same time the increase in urbanpopulation led to the creation of newChurch of England dioceses. The Cathedral of the Diocese of Liverpool which was founded in 1889 Return home
    • Evangelical & Catholic RevivalThe impact of the late eighteenthcentury European evangelical revivalgave a new missionary zeal to thatparty within the Church of England.This was followed by an equallysignificant catholic rebirth led by JohnKeble, Edward Bouverie Pusey andJohn Henry Newman, the latter a childof the evangelical revival.Newman’s developing understandingof the nature of the Church eventuallyled him to the Church of Rome Cardinal John Henry Newman © National Portrait Gallery, London Return home
    • Evangelical & Catholic RevivalRooted in a discovery of the teaching ofthe early church, catholic revivalemphasised order, dignity and beauty inworship; and, together with the insights ofevangelical leaders, an emphasis onholiness.The Anglican Benedictine Community of St Mary’s Abbey, Early 20th century reredos, Wymondham AbbeyWest Malling at the daily office Return home
    • The English CathedralThe cathedral is the focus of the Bishop’sministry within the diocese and a centre ofmission and education. Today cathedralshave become powerhouses for theChurch.They attract large numbers of people whocome as seekers, pilgrims and touristsmany of whom find the anonymity of alarge church initially helpful in exploring The Lichfield Festivaltheir spiritual journey. Here they findcounsel, hospitality, patronage of the arts,inspiring architecture, fine music andliturgy, together with opportunities forlearning.Next slide:The vibrant life of Norwich Cathedral Return home
    • The English CathedralScenes from Cathedral life Return home
    • The Church of England & the CrownThe English monarch is stillanointed and crowned by theArchbishop of Canterbury andexercises the position of“Supreme Governor” of theChurch of England. With theevolution of constitutionalmonarchy these powers are nowexercised through Parliament The Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, 1953but with Royal Assent. It wasthrough Parliament that the laitywere first given a voice in thegovernance of the Church. Return home
    • The Church of England & the CrownIn recent years theChurch, through itsGeneral Synod, has beengiven greaterresponsibility in orderingits own affairs,particularly in worshipand doctrine, and in theconsultation processleading to theappointment of itsbishops by the Crown. General Synod, February 2009 Return home
    • The Church of England and the Beginningsof a World CommunionAs British colonists and merchants spreadacross the globe, Church of Englandchaplains followed, under the jurisdiction ofthe Bishop of London.When the American colonies becameindependent a constitution was drawn upfor the Anglican Church there and bishopswere consecrated. In 1787 there followeda bishop for Nova Scotia and in 1814 thediocese of Calcutta was established. Declaration of Independence 1776 Return home
    • The Emergence of a World CommunionAs the number of new dioceses grew, sodid the need for doctrinal coherence anddiscipline. The Colenso controversy inSouth Africa encouraged ArchbishopLongley to call the first LambethConference in 1867. Lambeth Conference, 1867 Lambeth Palace, A view cross the Thames, 1750 Return home
    • The Emergence of a World Communion The Lambeth Conference 1998 The Lambeth Conference 2008 Return home
    • The Emergence of a World CommunionThe Archbishop of Canterbury is not only Primate of the Church ofEngland, he is also President of the world-wide Anglican Communion.2009 Primates’ Meeting,Alexandria, Egypt Return home
    • The Emergence of a World CommunionThe worldwide Anglican Communion nowcomprises more than 80 million members in 44regional and national member churches aroundthe globe in more than 160 countries.A full list of the 44 different churches (34provinces, 4 United Churches, and 6 otherchurches) can be found at the AnglicanCommunion website:www.anglicancommunion.org Return home
    • Ecumenism – The Search for UnityFour centuries of separation have beenfollowed by a century of healing as both atthe international and the local levelChristians have debated, explored and co-operated together.The first meeting between an Archbishopof Canterbury and a Pope since theReformation took place in 1960 whenArchbishop Geoffrey Fisher visited PopeJohn XXIII. Archbishop Geoffrey Fisher Return home
    • Ecumenism – The Search for UnityThe Second Vatican Council’s Decree onEcumenism (1964) opened the way for theestablishment of the Anglican-RomanCatholic International Commission. Thisdialogue has enabled the Churches tomake great strides towards unity.Meanwhile in 1966 Archbishop MichaelRamsey with the encouragement of PopePaul VI established the Anglican Centre inRome. Pope Paul VI and Archbishop Ramsey, 1966 The Queen at the Anglican Centre in Rome, 2000 Return home
    • Ecumenism – The Search for UnityAs Archbishop Ramsey was leaving the1966 Vatican meeting, Pope Paul handedhim his own episcopal ring. Since thenthe ring has been worn by Archbishops ofCanterbury whenever they meet the Pope. . The episcopal ring: “I felt vividly”, said Ramsey, “that he was giving me a piece of himself.” This tradition continues under the present Archbishop, Dr Rowan Williams, who has met on several occasions with Pope Benedict XVI and his predecessor.Archbishop Rowan and Pope Benedict, November 2009 Return home
    • Ecumenism – The Search for Unity 2006 Roman Catholic Bishops of England and Wales and Church of England Bishopshold a joint meeting in Leeds 2009 Greetings from the Archbishop of Canterbury at the Installation of the Archbishop of Westminster Return home
    • Growing TogetherIn 1976, the church of St John the Baptistin Norwich became the cathedral of thenew Catholic diocese of East Anglia. StJohn’s and Norwich Anglican Cathedralwork together as leading members of theecumenical partnership in the city. The Roman Catholic Cathedral in Norwich Opening the Jubilee Door at St John the Baptist Cathedral Return home
    • Growing Together in WorshipThe desire for Christian unity has been apowerful motive force in the renewal ofworship.Roman Catholic and Anglican scholarshave both contributed to the recovery ofthe early shape of the Eucharistic liturgyand other Communions have arrived at asimilar common pattern. The Sunday Eucharist at Norwich Anglican Cathedral Return home
    • Growing Together in WorshipTranslators have since provided agreedEnglish- language texts for the Churchesto share. Sunday by Sunday Christiansnow follow the same readings fromscripture.When the Queen received the first copy ofCommon Worship, the new Prayer Book, itmarked a key point in the renewal of the The Queen opening of copy of the new prayer book at the receives a General Synod, 2000Church of England’s liturgy. © PA/John Stillwell Return home
    • Growing Together: Church & SocietyThe Churches together inEngland have contributed bothjointly and severally to actionon current social issues; thecampaign on climate change,support for asylum-seekers,and challenging the call foreuthanasia are all cases inpoint. The churches are everactive in the relief ofhomelessness and poverty. The Archbishop of Canterbury with Cardinal Cormac Murphy O’Connor and other faith leaders on a Walk of Witness, July 2008.Next slide:Churches working with the vulnerable Return home
    • Growing Together:Church & Society A traditional birth attendant in Bangaldesh (above) Welcoming asylum seekers (top right) Caring for the homeless (right) Return home
    • Growing Together: Church & SocietyBoth the Anglican and Roman CatholicChurches have made a particularcontribution in the field of educationthrough their church schools. The Churchof England continues to be involved in adistinctive way in the life of the nationthrough its bishops sitting in the House ofLords. The Bishop of Norwich encourages work in education and learns from the younger generation Return home
    • Growing Together: Church & Society The Archbishops of Canterbury and Westminster campaign for Climate Change – The Wave 2009 Return home
    • Continuity, Change and CovenantSince 2002, successive Archbishops of Canterbury and Westminster,along with the other two co-presidents of Churches Together inEngland, have made a personal covenant:We believe in the Triune God: the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Because we confess "one,holy, catholic and apostolic church" our paramount ecumenical task is to show forth thisunity, which is always a gift of God. Jesus Christ revealed to us on the cross his love andthe mystery of reconciliation; as his followers, we intend to do our utmost to overcome theproblems and obstacles that still divide the churches.We rejoice that the Churches in England are steadily growing closer in mutual trust andrespect. As Presidents of Churches Together in England we have in common many joysand hopes, and we have much to offer and to receive from one another in the rich diversityof our traditions. continued …. Return home
    • Continuity, Change and CovenantWe believe that in our common pilgrimage we are being led by the Holy Spirit, and thatGod the Father, through our Lord Jesus Christ, is calling us to a deeper unity and to agreater sharing in our mission in his world.We therefore commit ourselvesto persevere in seeking a common understanding of Christs message of salvation in theGospel;in the power of the Holy Spirit, to work towards the visible unity of the Church of JesusChrist in the one faith, expressed in common discipleship, worship, witness and service. continued …. Return home
    • Continuity, Change and CovenantWe commit ourselvesto persevere in seeking a common understanding of Christs message of salvation in theGospel;in the power of the Holy Spirit, to work towards the visible unity of the Church of JesusChrist in the one faith, expressed in common discipleship, worship, witness and service.We undertaketo develop our mutual friendship and support,to pray, study and work together for the unity and mission of the Church,to consult together on issues affecting the common good,to promote justice, integrity and peace,to speak with one voice to give common witness to Jesus Christ, as far as we are able. Return home
    • About the presentationThis presentation is based on the Exhibition held in the Vatican Museums in 2002,arranged by Her Majestys Ambassador to the Holy See and the Dean and Chapter ofNorwich, at the invitation of the Roman Catholic Church.As part of its role of fostering friendly and informed relations between the AnglicanCommunion and the Roman Catholic Church, the Anglican Centre in Rome hasupdated the Exhibition in digital form, and now makes it available as this PowerpointPresentation and as an on-line version to be seen atwww.anglicancentreinrome.org/anglicanism .The Anglican Centre depends largely on individual donations to finance its work and itspresence in the heart of Rome. You are invited to support the Centre through prayerand giving. To make a donation go to www.anglicancentreinrome.org/donate .If you would like to be kept informed about the Anglican Centre, send a message tocentro@anglicancentre.it . Acknowledgements and copyright next page Return home
    • Acknowledgements and copyrightThe Anglican Centre in Rome gratefully acknowledges permission to use the images in this presentation.Thanks are due to the Dean and Chapter of Norwich for making material available, and to the Catholic League fortheir generous financial support of the project.Copyright-holders, where they have been traced, have given their permission for the use of images solely in thispresentation. Images should not be reproduced without obtaining permission from the copyright-holders.The Anglican Centre in Rome apologises if any copyright has been infringed and will rectify any error.Images - Copyright holders:Continuity and ChangeNorwich Cathedral - Public DomainThe Re-evangelisation of EnglandThe Martyrdom of Alban - UnknownCross of the Scriptures - Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government, DublinPectoral Cross - The Dean & Chapter of DurhamSt Felix - Woodmansterne, The Dean & Chapter of NorwichThe Foundations of the Church in EnglandSt Lukes Gospel - The Master and Fellows of Corpus Christi College, CambridgeNorth Elmham - Stephen HaywardThe Consolidation of Norman PowerBook of Job from Bury Bible - The Master and Fellows of Corpus Christi College, CambridgeCity of Norwich - Norwich Union, artist Tom GriffithsBayeaux Tapestry - Public domainThe English Parish ChurchSt Mary Worstead - Richard TilbrookSS Peter & Paul, Salle - Richard TilbrookTomb of Lord & Lady Bardolph,Dennington --Richard Tilbrook More acknowledgements and copyright next Return home
    • Acknowledgements and copyright continuedImages - Copyright holders:The BenedictinesPulpit panel. Horsham St Faith, Norfolk - EM TrendellNorwich Cathedral - Heritage House GroupPriors Door - EM TrendellA School of the Lord’s ServiceMonks in Choir - UnknownNorwich Cathedral Choir - Jacqueline WyattEadwine - The Master and Fellows of Trinity College, CambridgeThe Break with RomeHenry VIII -Studio of Hans Holbein the Younger, Portrait of Henry VIII, from the Castle Howard CollectionWalsingham Arch - Public domainThe Great Bible - By permission of the Master and Fellows of St Johns College, CambridgeThe English ReformationRood screen, Beeston-next-Mileham - Stephen HaywardThe Frontispiece of the Book of Common Prayer - Public domainA mutilated boss, Norwich Cathedral - Julia HedgecoeDefaced rood screen - Stephen HaywoodThe Catholic RestorationThe Burning of Archbishop Thomas Cranmer - The Trustees of Lambeth Palace LibraryThe Elizabethan SettlementElizabeth - Public domainBylaugh Church - Richard TilbrookRichard Hooker - Public domainThe Act of Supremacy - The National Archives, ref. C65/143 m.5Catholic RecusancyPriests Hole, Harvington Hall - The Archdiocese of BirminghamGunpowder Plot Conspiracy - National Portrait Gallery, LondonOxburgh Hall - The National Trust Photographic Library / Matthew AntrobusStonor Country Life - Picture Gallery / Paul Barker More acknowledgements and copyright next Return home
    • Acknowledgements and copyright continuedImages - Copyright holders:The Civil WarLaudian Screen, Brancepeth - Country Life Picture Gallery / Paul BarkerReturn of Charles II - The Trustees of Lambeth Palace LibraryExecution of Charles I - National Portrait Gallery, LondonNon-conformity or Protestant DissentOulton Church, Norfolk - Public domainJohn Wesley Preaching - Guildhall Museum, Boston, LincsJohn Bunyan - Bunyan Meeting Free ChurchReligious Freedom in a Changing WorldNicholas Wiseman - Public domainWestminster Catholic Cathedral - Public domainLiverpool Cathedral -- Public domainThe Evangelical and Catholic RevivalWest Malling Anglican Benedictine Community - Michael HarrisJohn Henry Newman (Millais) - National Portrait Gallery, LondonWymondam Abbey Reredos - -Des Adams PhotographyThe English CathedralLichfield Festival - Lichfield Festival OfficeSt Johns Cathedral, Norwich - Public domainWedding - Coes of Castle Meadow, NorwichThe Church of England and the CrownQueen visiting the Centre - Anglican Centre in RomeArchbishop Fisher crowns Queen Elizabeth II - The Trustees of Lambeth Palace Library More acknowledgements and copyright next Return home
    • Acknowledgements and copyright continuedImages - Copyright holders:The Emergence of a World CommunionLambeth Palace - The Trustees of Lambeth Palace LibraryThe Anglican Communion - The Anglican Communion OfficeLambeth Conference 1867 - The Anglican Communion OfficeLambeth Conference 1998 - The Anglican Communion OfficeLambeth Conference 2008 - The Anglican Communion OfficeEcumenism – the Search for UnityArchbishop Geoffrey Fisher - Lambeth PalaceThe Second Vatican Council -Public domainPope Paul VI and Archbishop - Public domainThe Episcopal Ring - Archbishop of Canterbury2006 Roman Catholic Bishops - Catholic Bishops Conference of England and WalesGreetings from the Archbishop - Catholic Bishops Conference of England and WalesGrowing Together in WorshipNorwich Anglican Cathedral Norman CarmichaelQueen receiving Common Worship - PA Photos / John StillwellGrowing Together: Church and SocietyWalk of Witness - Lambeth PalaceAsia Begum - Christian Aid / Elaine DulgenanCaring for the Homeless - St Botolphs, AldgateWelcoming Asylum seekers - The Diocese of NorwichThe Bishop of Norwich - The Diocese of NorwichContinuity, Change and CommitmentThe Wave Catholic - Bishops Conference of England and Wales Return home