Ebook and ereaders

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NEFLIN Presentation held at the Jacksonville Public Library for staff, librarians, and academics by Dawn Jensen

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Ebook and ereaders

  1. 1. E-books and E-readers Presented by Virtual Options Coaching & Training
  2. 2. March 6, 2012According to new research fromDigitimes Research, global shipmentsof eReaders are predicted to reach 2million units in the first quarter of 2012,which is down from 9 million, whichshipped during the fourth quarter of2011.
  3. 3. Definition & HistoryeBooks: *  First produced by Project Gutenberg in the 1970s *  Had to be read using a computer until late 1990s *  Started out for small and very targeted markets: technical manuals, etc. *  Most books that were digitized were already in the public domain © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  4. 4. eReaders (standalone)*  eReaders: *  Came on the market in the late 1990s *  Dedicated hardware devices for accessing e-books *  Specifically designed for the reading experience *  Are available for the general consumer to use *  Market is dominated by only a few eReaders: Amazon Kindle B&N Nook Sony Reader ($259) ($259) ($169-$399) © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  5. 5. Other “readers”eBooks are also available via other devices: *  “Regular” computers *  Laptops, netbooks *  Smartphones *  May need special software applications © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  6. 6. Possible document formatsNot all documents can be read on all devices.*  Some possible formats include: *  PDF *  Broadband eBooks (BBeB): proprietary (Sony) *  RTF *  Amazon Whispernet (AZW): proprietary (Amazon) *  HTML © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  7. 7. For Amazon Kindle, from wikipedia © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  8. 8. Conversion*  There are many proprietary and free ebook converters that can convert documents to the formats appropriate for the device you’re using:http://wiki.mobileread.com/wiki/E-book_conversion © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  9. 9. Digital Rights Management short versionDRM=limitations for the user*  Prevents transferring, copying, printing, too many downloads, etc.*  Always check to see what limitations may come with the document you’re purchasing/downloading *  Consumer comments re: DRM: *  “I call it a Swindle, not a Kindle”DRM-free? *  Project Gutenberg *  Manybooks (link at end of presentation) © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  10. 10. DRM-free e-bookshttp://drmfree.calibre-ebook.com/ http://www.gutenberg.org/ http://overdrive.com/ http://openlibrary.org/
  11. 11. Other (evolution of?) eReadersALA Midwinter TechSource webinar:*  Blio (http://blioreader.com) *  Free eReader software*  Copia (http://www.thecopia.com) *  Social eReading experience*  Sophie (http://www.sophiecommons.org) *  “Redefines the notion of a book” © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  12. 12. Advantages*  Books are cheaper (around $10)*  Instantaneous access*  Space saver*  Environmentally friendly*  Access to many out of copyright texts*  Visual advantages for those with weak eyesight or for reading in direct sunlight*  Annotating/hyperlinking/etc.*  Many have read-aloud features*  Many have language translation features © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  13. 13. Disadvantages*  Devices themselves are expensive*  Obsolescence*  Susceptibility to damage*  All your “eggs” in one device*  Content compatibility*  Navigating tricky legal situations © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  14. 14. Some ConsiderationsHow are advantages/disadvantages resolved?*  Consider: *  Use *  Lifestyle *  Preference *  Budget *  Savviness © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  15. 15. Resources*  Horizon Report Resources: http://delicious.com/tag/hz10+ebooks*  Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page*  Scribd: http://www.scribd.com*  DailyLit: http://dailylit.com*  ManyBooks.Net http://manybooks.net © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  16. 16. https://secure.flickr.com/photos/libraryman/
  17. 17. http://www.christopherpnmaselli.com/2010/10/ebooks-amazon-kindle-and-apple-ipad-statistics/
  18. 18. New Research from Pew Research CenterAccording to the Pew Research Center’s Internet & AmericanLife Project, 19% of adults now own a tablet computerand 19% own an e-book reader, according to a surveyconducted this month, up from 10% ownership of tablets and10% ownership of e-book readers.Pew says 9% of adults now own both types of devices. © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  19. 19. Demographic Profile of tablet & e-book readers*  educated and affluent.*  highest rates of ownership are among consumers who are college graduates*  age 30-49*  incomes of $75,000 or more*  36% of adults with incomes of $75,000 or more own a tablet now*  31% own an e-book reader*  rate of tablet ownership is equal for males and females*  more women e-book reader owners (21%) than men (16%). © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  20. 20. © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  21. 21. Weedingyour physicalcollection? Yes? Donate thesebooks to Open Library. More information at:http://openlibrary.org/
  22. 22. “If libraries are no longer storage spaces, I think they become knowledge performance spaces.”   Source:  @rmazar   Share your space. Foster collaboration. Facilitate discovery. “Rethink possible.” © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  23. 23. Privacy and Your Rights
  24. 24. The 2010: E-Book Buyers Guide to E-Book Privacy answers the following questions:ü  Can they keep track of book searches, either on their website or on the website of other e-book sources?ü  Can they monitor what youre reading and how youre reading it after purchase and link that information back to you? Can they do that when the e-book is obtained elsewhere?ü  Does the device have limited compatibility with books not purchased from an associated eBook store?ü  Can they keep track of book purchases? Can they track book purchses or acquisitions made from other sources?ü  With whom can they share the information collected in non- aggregated form?ü  Can they share information outside the company without the customers consent?ü  Do they lack mechanisms for customers to access, correct, or delete the information? Source: http://goo.gl/SwsNB
  25. 25. The E-book User’s Bill of Rights*  the right to use e-books under guidelines that favor access over proprietary limitations.*  the right to access e-books on any technological platform, including the hardware and software the user chooses.*  the right to annotate, quote passages, print, and share e-book content within the spirit of fair use and copyright.*  the right of the first-sale doctrine extended to digital content, allowing the e-book owner the right to retain, archive, share, and re-sell purchased e-books. Read more at: http://goo.gl/YiTb9
  26. 26. Book Discovery/Recommendations © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  27. 27. QR (Quick Response) codes can help guide mobile users in your physical spaces come visit your digital library spaces. © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  28. 28. © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  29. 29. Broward County’sidea. The key is to at least try something new.© 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  30. 30. Idea: Offering free workshops for the public and ask people to bring their devices! © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  31. 31. Idea: Help local authors get published © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  32. 32. A complete self-publishing platform. Converting text to EPUB format using CalibreUpload local content to“Community Reserve.” © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  33. 33. Idea: mention to out-of-state library patrons to find out what e-bookvendor[s] their libraryuses and search for a cheat sheet online.Or ask a librarian for help. Be ready!! http://overdrive.com/files/ ebook-cheat-sheet.pdf
  34. 34. Popular E-book Vendors/ Platforms 3M Cloud Freading Library Gale Virtual Axis 360 Reference Library Blio MyILibrary Books 24X7 OpenLibrary (not a EBL (E-book vendor) Library) OverDrive eBrary Project Gutenberg EBSCO (not a vendor) Safari Books Online
  35. 35. The key is to practice. Use your e- reading device often, explore its functions, and read the FAQs.
  36. 36. Four Main ebook formats*  There are four main ebook formats at present. *  Mobipocket *  Topaz *  ePub *  PDF *  The Amazon Kindle uses Mobipocket and Topaz and it also supports native PDF format ebooks and native PDF files. *  Other ebook readers mostly use ePub format ebooks, but with differing DRM schemes. © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  37. 37. *  There are three main ebook DRM schemes in common use today, one each from Adobe, Apple, and the Marlin Trust Management Organization (MTMO) © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  38. 38. *  Two PC and Macintosh software programs to view e-books are Adobe Reader and Microsoft Reader.[43] Each program uses a slightly different approach to DRM. The first version of Adobe Acrobat e-book Reader to have encryption technologies was version 5.05. In the later version 6.0, the technologies of the PDF reader and the e-book reader were combined, allowing it to read both DRM-restricted and unrestricted files. © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  39. 39. *  Microsoft Reader, which exclusively reads e-books in a .lit format, contains its own DRM software. In Microsoft Reader, there are three different levels of access control depending on the e-book: *  sealed e-books, *  inscribed e-books *  owner exclusive e-books. *  Sealed e-books have the least amount of restriction and only prevent the document from being modified. © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  40. 40. Said another way…*  a system for protecting the copyrights of data circulated via the Internet or other digital media by enabling secure distribution and/or disabling illegal distribution of the data.*  a DRM system protects intellectual property by either encrypting the data so that it can only be accessed by authorized users or marking the content with a digital watermark or similar method so that the content can not be freely distributed. © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  41. 41. Products with DRM*  Certain categories of products are disproportionately impacted by DRM. When youre considering buying a product in one of these categories, its a good idea to do a quick search (on Defective by Design or the web at large).*  Music*  Movies (see: bluray)*  ebooks (see: Kindle Swindle)*  Computers (Mac and Windows)*  Mobile phones (e.g. the iPhone)*  Games © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  42. 42. Microsoft Reader*  The most stringent form of security that Microsoft Reader offers is called owner exclusive e-books, which uses traditional DRM technologies.*  To buy the e-book the consumer must first open Microsoft Reader, which ensures that when the book is downloaded it becomes linked to the computers Microsoft Passport account. Thus the e-book can only be opened with the computer with which it was downloaded, preventing copying and distribution of the text. © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  43. 43. With Printed Books…*  You can buy one with cash, anonymously.*  Then you own it.*  You are not required to sign a license that restricts your use of it.*  The format is known, and no proprietary technology is needed to read the book.*  You can give, lend or sell the book to another.*  You can, physically, scan and copy the book, and its sometimes lawful under copyright.*  Nobody has the power to destroy your book. © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  44. 44. Contrast that with Amazon e-books (fairly typical)*  Amazon requires users to identify themselves to get an e-book.*  In some countries, including the US, Amazon says the user cannot own the e- book.*  Amazon requires the user to accept a restrictive license on use of the e-book.*  The format is secret, and only proprietary user-restricting software can read it at all.*  An ersatz "lending" is allowed for some books, for a limited time, but only by specifying by name another user of the same system. No giving or selling.*  To copy the e-book is impossible due to Amazon can remotely delete the e- book using a back door. It used this back door in 2009 to delete thousands of copies of George Orwells 1984.Digital Restrictions Management in the player and prohibited by the license, whichis more restrictive than copyright law. © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  45. 45. The Dangers of e-books
  46. 46. An Argument against e-books.. http://DefectiveByDesign.org/ebooks.html*  Even one of these infringements makes e-books a step backward from printed books. We must reject e-books until they respect our freedom.*  The e-book companies say denying our traditional freedoms is necessary to continue to pay authors. The current copyright system supports those companies handsomely and most authors badly. We can support authors better in other ways that dont require curtailing our freedom, and even legalize sharing. Two methods Ive suggested are:*  To distribute tax funds to authors based on the cube root of each authors popularity. See http://stallman.org/articles/internet-sharing-license.en.html.*  E-books need not attack our freedom (Project Gutenbergs e-books dont), but they will if companies get to decide. Its up to us to stop them. © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  47. 47. Key Concerns for LibrariesDRM, if not carefully balanced, limits the ability of libraries and schools to serve the information needs of their users and their communities in several ways by:
  48. 48. Eliminating the “First sale” doctrineby limiting the secondary transfer of works toothers. First sale has been for centuries abedrock principle governing the balance ofrights between consumers and sellers ofinformation products. It is first sale that allowspeople to share a favorite book or CD with afriend and that creates secondary markets forworks. It is first sale that allows libraries to loanlawfully acquired works to the public. http://www.ala.org/advocacy/copyright/digitalrights © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  49. 49. Enforcing a “Pay-per-use” model of information dissemination that, if it becomes the dominant or even sole mode of access, will be contrary to the public purposes of copyright law. It should not be the business of government to favor or enforce any particular business model in the information marketplace, particularly one that raises major issues of equity and potentially severe economic consequences for public institutions. http://www.ala.org/advocacy/copyright/digitalrights © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  50. 50. Enforcing time limits or other limitations of use that prevent preservation and archiving.Many market models of DRM distribution systems envision contentthat essentially disappears after a specific period of time or numberof uses.DRM technologies can also prevent copying content into newformats. Such controls will prevent libraries, historical archives,museums, research institutions, and other cultural institutions frompreserving and providing long-term access to the knowledgeproducts of our society.From the days of the Great Library of Alexandria, society has turnedto such institutions to preserve its cultural heritage and provideaccess to it. There is no evidence that alternative organizationscurrently exist or will form to play that role in the digital pay-per-useworld. http://www.ala.org/advocacy/copyright/digitalrights © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved
  51. 51. Eliminating “fair use” and other exceptions in Copyright Law that underpin education, criticism, and scholarship. DRM technology can prevent normal uses of works protected by copyright law, such as printing or excising portions for quotation. For libraries and schools to serve their educational, research, and information roles, the public must be able to use works in the full range of ways envisioned by the Copyright Act in its limitations and exceptions. http://www.ala.org/advocacy/copyright/digitalrights © 2012 Virtual Options LLC Proprietary Information All Rights Reserved

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