Q+A with Dalucci Design Dana Angelucci
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Q+A with Dalucci Design Dana Angelucci

on

  • 1,159 views

Emerging interior designer Dana Angelucci lets down her hair and shares her personal insights on helping clients elevate their residential and commercial spaces.

Emerging interior designer Dana Angelucci lets down her hair and shares her personal insights on helping clients elevate their residential and commercial spaces.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,159
Slideshare-icon Views on SlideShare
1,155
Embed Views
4

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
1

2 Embeds 4

https://si0.twimg.com 3
http://pinterest.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

11 of 1

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Q+A with Dalucci Design Dana Angelucci Q+A with Dalucci Design Dana Angelucci Document Transcript

    • Elevated  Spaces…    One  of  the  biggest  thrills  for  interior  designers,  is  watching  different  décor  elements  come  together  to  create  just  the  look  they,  and  their  clients,  had  envisioned—a  process  that  involves  more  than  one  viewpoint  and  a  lot  of  details.      For  Dana  Angelucci,  founder  of  Dalucci  Design,  based  in  Philadelphia,  the  excitement  also  extends  to  the  improved  lifestyles  a  fresh,  “more  organized”  space  can  provide  to  her  clients.  Nothing  gets  her  going  more  than  the  knowledge  that  something  as  benign  as  closets  and  extra  sinks  in  a  bathroom,  or  “found  space”  for  a  kitchen  pantry,  can  have  such  a  huge  impact  on  a  homeowner’s  state  of  mind.  No  matter  what  a  project’s  scope  is,  says  Angelucci,  it’s  the  little  things  that  make  a  difference.  But  to  get  to  the  “little  things,”  as  she  often  reminds  her  clients,  you  have  to  see  the  big  picture.  Then  you  worry  about  the  details.  “Tell  me  how  you  live,  and  then  tell  me  what  you  want.  It’s  that  simple.”      TWE:  How  long  have  you  been  in  the  interior  design  business?  DA:  Officially,  about  three  years.  But,  my  childhood  exposure  to  the  architect,  construction  and  design  industries  pretty  much  makes  me  a  “lifer.”  I  can  still  remember  watching  my  grandfather,  father  and  uncles  as  they  dissected  building  and  remodeling  projects  on  paper  and  on-­‐site.  Their  conversations  fascinated  me.  Many  of  the  projects  I  saw  from  start  to  finish—from  footers  being  poured,  to  studs  and  drywall,  to  paint  and  then  the  final  touches—sparkling  chandeliers,  plush  carpets  and  artwork.  All  of  it  enticed  me.        TWE:  Where  does  the  Dalucci  philosophy  fall  in  relation  to  the  industry,  and  also  to  other  designers  in  the  area?    DA:  One  of  my  core  strengths  is  the  comfort  level  I  have  in  blending—old  and  new,  funky  with  functional,  “glam”  with  livability—and  an  ability  to  draw  out  and  
    • refine  a  clients  true  style.  Empowering  my  clients  to  trust  their  instincts  creates  a  unique  bond  that  enables  me  to  build  lasting  relationships.  I  also  tend  to  use  trends  cautiously  and  strategically,  and  to  keep  my  design/décor  preferences  in  check.  I  prefer  to  enhance  rather  than  bulldoze.  And  when  it  comes  to  resolving  space  and  budget  constraints,  I  am  always  up  for  a  challenge.  It’s  the  ultimate  jigsaw  puzzle.  When  you  find  the  right  piece,  or  design  detail  that  fits,  it’s  exhilarating.      TWE:  How  do  you  infuse  your  personal  style  into  the  Dalucci  brand?  What  are  some  of  your  signature  touches  on-­‐  and  off-­‐site?    DA:  While  I  promote  my  clients  style  first,  I  do  have  a  few  cardinal  rules  and  design  pet  peeves.  First,  is  organization:  My  clients  learn  right  away,  that  this  is  the  key  to  working  with  me—and  to  enjoying  their  space  long  after  I  leave.  I  take  the  time  to  not  only  design  the  new  organizational  system,  but  also  to  teach  them  how  and  why  I  did  it  that  way,  and  tailor  it  to  their  own  habits  so  its  not  such  a  hard  new  habit  for  them  to  pick  up.  “Clutter-­‐clearing”  (re-­‐arranging  books,  picture  frames,  etc.)  and  organization  both  offer  instant  gratification;  I’ve  never  had  a  client  that  didn’t  thank  me  for  persuading  them  to  toss  or  file.  And  again,  my  affinity  for  blending  old  and  new  permeates  every  project.  I  love  getting  clients  into  their  attics  for  a  shopping  trip.  Usually  there  is  something  great  up  there  just  gathering  dust.  But  through  sharing  it  with  me  and  with  guests,  a  deeper  insight  is  gained  into  into  their  personal  style,  as  well  as  their  cultural/familial  history.  Incorporating  this  into  an  updated,  beautiful  and  functional  space  minimizes  any  chance  that  the  space  will  feel  rigid  or  cold  because  everything  is  new.    I  often  use  earthy  tones  on  the  walls  for  the  same  reason.        TWE:  What  are  some  of  the  challenges  facing  both  designers  and  their  clients  in  the  current  economy?  DA:  The  current  economy  has  made  designers  more  resourceful  and  creative  in  their  sourcing.    Salvage  is  very  hot  right  now,  and  everyone  is  shopping  around  more,  which  is  actually  good  for  all.  Buying  local  has  become  even  more  popular,  not  just  because  of  the  product,  but  because  of  the  quality  of  customer  service  and  strong  relationships  —  traditional  business  values  that  never  go  out  of  style.          
    • TWE:    What  are  some  of  your  favorite  interiors  in  the  city?    DA:  That’s  a  hard  question  a  space  is  more  than  just  what  it  looks  like…  I  think  of  what  it  feels  like  when  I’m  in  there.  Like  was  it  a  comfortable  dining  experience,  shopping  experience,  etc.  Could  I  see  or  grab  the  item  easily?  My  favorite  building  (inside  and  out)  is  the  Bellevue  Stratford.  It’s  just  so  rich  in  history  and  so  beautiful.    I  have  a  deep  appreciation  for  revivals,  especially  when  the  integrity  of  the  period  style  is  preserved  and  the  amenities  of  today  are  properly  integrated    TWE:  What  are  some  of  your  favorite  design  blogs,  locally  and  nationally?  DA:    Remodelista,  Padstyle,  3Rings,  Houzz.com–  just  to  name  a  few.  Sometimes  I  stumble  upon  a  great  one,  read  it,  tab  it,  keep  it  up  a  while  and  then  forget  –  so  I  am  always  wandering  to  see  what  everyone  is  doing.  I  am  still  a  fan  of  glossy  magazines.    It’s  my  nightcap  buddy  on  the  weekends…      TWE:  What  was  your  room  like  as  a  kid?  How  much  say  did  you  have  in  the  way  it  was  decorated?    DA:  I  have  been  rearranging  the  furniture  in  my  bedroom  since  I  was  strong  enough  to  push  a  bed  from  one  end  of  the  room  the  other.    My  mom  never  got  involved  or  pushed  for  certain  window  treatments  or  anything,  so  I  was  always  in  charge  of  my  space.    Thus,  I  was  always  imagining  new  designs  for  my  room  and  coming  up  with  new  ways  to  hang  a  curtain,  affix  it  to  one  side,  cut  it,  re-­‐sow  it  and  piece  it  together.    I  loved  moving  my  furniture  around  and  that  remains  true  today.    Space  planning/furniture  placement  is  by  far  my  favorite  thing  to  do  when  designing.    I  also  find  it  among  the  top  most  important  elements  when  designing  a  space  –  like  real  estate,  in  design  I  think…  “Location,  location,  location.”      Even  the  best  piece  will  look  horrid  in  the  wrong  spot.    This  spatial  inclined  designer  feels  that  a  good  space  plan  promotes  the  best  design  and  living  environment.    Also,  when  I  was  young  and  had  just  finished  rearranging  my  room  (and  organizing)  I  remember  feeling  so  excited  and  happy,  that  I  didn’t  want  to  leave.    My  friends  still  joke  today  about  me  going  to  their  houses  and  rearrange/reorganizing  their  rooms.    TWE:  Where  do  you  look  for  design  inspiration?    DA:  I  have  a  fairly  active  imagination,  so  there’s  no  shortage  of  ideas.  (Pinterest  is  also  a  favorite  resource—for  me,  and  apparently,  the  entire  webiverse.)  I  can  shop  just  about  anywhere  too;  despite  the  economy,  there  are  great  little  boutiques  everywhere  selling  eco-­‐chic  to  Uptown  Manhattan  chic.  Nothing  gets  
    • me  going  as  much  as  walking  block  after  block,  taking  a  pulse  on  what’s  for  sale  and  what’s  in  use.  Hey  if  you  don’t  want  me  looking,  close  the  blinds!  I  get  a  lot  of  inspiration  from  my  dreams,  as  crazy  as  that  sounds.  Basically,  I  obsess  and  fantasize  about  furniture  and  décor  the  way  other  people  daydream  about  food.        TWE:  Improvement  is  the  motivation  behind  all  remodels.  How  does  your  design  improve  a  client’s  experience  in  their  home?  How  do  you  know  you’ve  provided  a  good  design?  DA:  In  any  project,  spatial  layout  is  key.  Without  a  deeper  understanding  of  HOW  to  improve  a  space,  it  can  just  be  a  big  bill  with  little  payoff.  Being  able  to  get  involved  at  the  beginning  of  a  full-­‐scale  remodel,  allows  me  to  attain  optimal  fulfillment  for  both  my  client  and  myself.  This,  of  course,  begins  with  listening  carefully  to  what  a  client  wants  out  of  the  remodel  AND  what  he/she  wants  in  the  way  of  improved  everyday  living.  Being  skilled  at  helping  to  identify  a  client’s  needs  even  if  when  he/she  is  unaware  of  these  issues,  is  crucial  to  getting  it  right.    When  I  get  letters  from  my  clients  after  the  project,  telling  me  how  much  happier  they  are  (it’s  not  always  about  how  much  better  the  space  looks  that  grabs  them);  that’s  getting  it  right.      TWE:  What  are  some  of  the  challenges  of  creating  redesigning  an  existing  home?  DA:  With  an  existing  structure,  too  many  changes  equal  huge  construction  costs  and  lengthy  construction  times.    SO,  identifying  the  most  crucial  problem  areas  in  the  space  is  key  that  way  we  CAN  finish  and  we  don’t  sky  rocket  the  budget  towards  the  end….  Not  everything  always  has  to  change.    An  expert  needs  to  inform  the  client  which  area(s)  are  truly  in  need  and  what  areas  are  simply  cosmetic.    The  client  in  turn  needs  to  communicate  what  they  really  dislike  about  their  current  home  and  what  they  are  okay  with,  by  this  we  can  prioritize  and  get  the  job  done  with  effective  results!    Then,  I  plan,  plan,  and  plan.    I  always  have  a  plan  of  attack.    I  think,  “What  can  we  re-­‐paint,  sand  or  refurbish  to  make  a  totally  new  look  out  of  an  existing  wall  or  built-­‐in/etc.  without  breaking  the  bank?    How  can  we  do  this  with  as  little  aggravation  to  the  daily  lifestyle  of  the  client?    What  item(s)  are  the  clients  attached  to  on  a  sentimental  level?    It  is  also  crucial  to  know  what  NOT  to  touch.    And  always  remember,  perfect  does  not  exist  and  some  limitations  can  be  good!          
    • TWE:    Kitchens  can  be  the  most  complex  and  expensive  rooms  to  remodel.  How  do  you  design  a  kitchen  for  the  21st  century  homeowner?  DA:  When  designing  kitchens,  learning  what  is  most  important  to  the  person  who  runs  the  kitchen  Step  No.1.    Being  up  on  appliances  (and  having  great  connections)  is  also  paramount.  Typically  the  cost  of  appliances  eats  up  a  lot  of  the  budget,  so  there’s  plenty  of  reason  to  know  each  and  every  detail.  Getting  clients  to  think  practically  in  a  kitchen  project  is  not  always  easy.  Kitchens  are  showpieces.  If  a  client  is  a  cook,  I  help  them  get  their  dream  kitchen.  If  they’re  more  about  the  occasional  party  and  resale,  I  help  them  get  the  look.  Energy  efficiency  is  obviously  hot  right  now,  so  there’s  even  more  information  to  sift  through.  Finding  space  when  it’s  not  there  is  another  challenge  as  prep  areas  are  bigger  nowadays;  people  seem  to  be  cooking  at  home  more  and  eating  out  less.    With  so  many  cool  cooking  shows  and  portable  tablets,  you  can  learn  from  the  best  in  your  own  home.  Saving  a  little  space  to  set  up  your  iPad  wise.  Storage  is  bigger  now  too.  Everyone  has  an  abundance  of  appliances  but  they  don’t  necessarily  want  them  out  on  the  counter  all  the  time.        TWE:  How  do  you  approach  bathroom  design  for  different  types  of  client?  What  are  a  few  of  your  favorite  elements  to  include  in  a  bathroom?  DA:  Clients  want  to  be  comfortable  in  their  bathroom.    The  style  may  change,  but  being  accommodated  properly  (shower  size,  counter/sink  height,  privacy  needs)  come  first.  The  best  question  to  ask  clients  is  what  they  hated  about  their  existing  bathroom.  Generally,  I  love  a  sharp  tile  design,  sleek  and  clean,  or  sophisticated  rustic.  Tile  covers  so  much  surface  area  in  a  bathroom  that  the  design  has  to  be  spot  on.  I  use  AutoCAD  to  layout  my  tile  for  a  bathroom  so  the  tile  layers  know  exactly  what  I  am  trying  to  accomplish.  Quality  tile  layers  have  a  HUGE  impact  on  a  bathroom’s  design.  I  like  the  guys  who  treat  it  like  an  art  instead  of  slapping  tile  over  grout  and  calling  it  a  day.      TWE:  Outside  of  kitchens  and  baths,  what  is  your  favorite  living  space  to  design?  How  do  you  make  this  space  stand  out?  DA:  Entryways,  master  bedrooms  and  dining  rooms.  I  love  the  impact  and  drama  of  a  stunning  entryway  and  the  formality  of  a  dining  room.    As  for  the  master  bedroom,  the  design  process  is  very  different  than  any  other  room  because  it’s  a  very  personal  space  with  tremendous  impact  on  the  client.  It’s  more  of  a  challenge,  and  I  like  challenges.          
    •  TWE:  What  space  would  you  love  to  get  your  hands  on  and  renovate/revamp?    DA:  That’s  easy:  The  Bellevue-­‐Stratford  on  Broad  Street.  I  already  have  a  design  concept  drawn  up  for  the  19th  floor  that  would  include  a  club,  theater  and  restaurant,  The  Labyrinth.  It  is  based  on  unexpected,  almost  surrealistic  design  concepts.  Bringing  this  project  to  life  would  be  immensely  gratifying.      TWE:  What  should  potential  customers  consider  when  embarking  on  an  interior  design  project  with  a  professional?  DA:  Three  things:    budget,  timeline  and  trust  level.  Once  those  parameters  have  been  worked  through,  it’s  time  for  a  little  show  and  tell.  All  initial  consults  should  start  with  a  client  sharing  photographs  and/or  magazine  clippings.  Showing  details  and  styles  that  you  like  is  much  easier  than  explaining  it.  Plus,  it  enables  the  designer  to  pick  the  images  apart  and  find  out  exactly  what  it  is  about  this  space  that  is  enticing—the  lines,  the  colors,  the  shapes,  the  accessories,  all  of  the  above?  The  client  also  can  glean  information  about  the  designer—most  significantly  if  the  designer  is  genuinely  excited  about  your  choices.  Finally,  it  is  imperative  that  you  put  trust  in  your  designer  and  clearly  communicate  your  personal  style  and  your  LIFE  style.  Without  knowing  how  you,  and  others,  are  going  to  use  the  space,  it  is  impossible  to  create  a  design  that  is  both  attractive  and  functional.  To  designers,  insight  into  a  client’s  life  serves  as  a  mental  blueprint  and  results  in  a  space  that  excites  you  every  day.     daluccidesign.com