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Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer
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Eng662 cyber culture_e_poster_dawnboyer

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Research Project for Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA English 662, Cyber-Cultures and Digital Writing by Dawn Boyer

Research Project for Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA English 662, Cyber-Cultures and Digital Writing by Dawn Boyer

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  • 1. Do millennials have a cognitive awareness of participation in social media venues for impact on future career search or schooling prospects? Dawn D. Boyer, M.Ad.Ed., Old Dominion University English 662, Cyber-Cultures and Digital Writing
  • 2. Parallel Tasking or Wasting Time?
    • The demographic age group of older teens and young adults between 18 and 24 are called Millennials.
    • These are computer and tech savvy – using multiple venues to communicate, work, and play.
    • If millennials are not playing Nintendo video games, or Internet-based games on their X-Box 360, they may be chatting via their cellular device, IM’ing on Facebook or MySpace, while text messaging in the background.
  • 3. Answers sought in this research study…
    • Do Millennials know how use of social media network sites might reflect on career goals, future, or school?
    • Have they been warned, or do they know, about using explicit language, posting unflattering (porn) photos?
    • Have teachers, parents, or peers informed them to use a private setting to avoid the risk of the ‘wrong people’ seeing their ‘ privlic ’* info?
    • Do Millennials even care?
    *Privlic = mashup of the words private and public (posted info): public because a unique set of people can view or see it, but private because the set of people seeing the information is limited to a restricted group by profile owner.
  • 4. Researcher’s Biases / Assumptions
    • 50%+ millennials would have photos, posts, foul language, or commentary considered ‘risqué.’*
    • Millennials would be naïve about background checks.
    • Millennials would be on social media for hours daily.
    • *Graphics of private body parts, sexual innuendos / overt sexual words, photos, graphics, or content that could be labeled as pornographic or unacceptable in general society (US).
  • 5. What the literature had to say…
    • Millennials make up 24.8% of users, down from 40.8% in Jan/09, whereas 35-54 year old users have doubled their use (istrategylabs, 2010)
    • Social media site profile content may potentially embarrass future employers; they avoid the future disciplinary hassle by not hiring candidates (deVries, 2003)
  • 6. What the literature had to say…
    • There are no expectations of privacy once data is stored electronically (deVries, 2003)
    • Sub-cultures imitate real-life and learning is based on community discourse (Squire & Steinkuehler, 2005)
  • 7. What the literature had to say…
    • Teens learn from each other across social media platforms
    • (Squire & Steinkuehler, 2005)
    • ‘ Word-of-Mouth’ (WOM) is one of the most powerful method of electronically communicating to young people
    • (Crutzen, 2009)
  • 8. What the literature had to say…
    • There are four diverse users of the Internet and interactive media use of millennials:
      • Traditionalists
      • Gamers
      • Networkers
      • Producers
    • (Van Den Beemt, et al, 2010)
  • 9. What the literature had to say…
    • Four clusters of activities are:
    • Browsing (Traditionalist),
    • Performing (Gamers),
    • Interchanging (Networkers),
    • Authoring (Producing), which form a dimension stretching in scope for interactivity based on the level of use
    • (Van Den Beemt, et al, 2010)
  • 10. What the literature had to say…
    • In targeting millennials for (military) recruitment, study of the demographic culture is essential at three sequential levels:
      • Surface
      • Middle – social norms and symbols
      • Deep – beliefs, including values, emotions, and underlying assumptions
    • (Lt. Col. Kay A. Smith, 2009)
  • 11. Literature based generalized theories…
    • Social media & technology users are computer literate, highly capable of pushing through & increasing value of a message
    • Teen or young adult users of communication technology have a broad range of reach to their peers
    • (Crutzen, 2009)
  • 12. Literature based theories are…
    • Peer messages carry more weight than organization-based messages
    • (Crutzen, 2009)
    • It’s not so much the content employers should be concerned about – they should be looking at applicants’ capability of using modern technology to it’s fullest extent
    • (Lt. Col. Kay A. Smith, 2009)
  • 13. Methodology
    • Observation of public behavior on social media sites used by Millennials
    • Convenience sample based on a close-knit, social group of older teens (18-20 years)
    • Gender representations in population = males (9) + females (7)
    • High School grads; currently participating in secondary schooling
  • 14. Methodology
    • Researcher observed social media sites as qualitative data collection
    • Data collected from websites with no names or identifiers attached, data remains confidential
    • Participants answered 6 questions
    • Data coded for confidentiality of responses, avoid participants risk of criminal / civil liability / damage to financial standing / employability / reputation
  • 15. Data Results
    • Nine (56.25%) males and seven (43.75%) females
    • 13 (81.25%) of the participants were ‘strangers’ to researcher
    • All but one (93.75%) of millennials had Facebook profiles
    • One (6.25%) had additional, active social media
  • 16. Data Results
    • Seven (43.75%) had public profiles
    • Eight (50%) had private statuses
    • One (6.25%) was unaware background checks were completed on applicants
  • 17. Data Results
    • Two (12.5%) were unaware schools and companies would check social media sites for content
    • Eighteen percent of the participants were unaware of potential negative consequences via social media
  • 18. COMMENTS BY PARTICIPANTS
    • “…keep MySpace ‘friends’ separate from Facebook ‘friends’ for privacy issues, even though both set to privacy…”
    • “…keep Parole Officer from reading about activities…a sibling read about…activities and phoned PO to ‘tattle’ on activity…”
    • “…abandoned all forms of social media because…‘stalkers’…were ‘fighting’ online over me…”
    • “…I don’t comment on ‘smoking’…”
    • …social media profiles “caused too much trouble.”
  • 19. Most participants who had heard about ‘background checks by employers’ noted…
    • “… I don’t work for the type of company that would do that (background check)…”.
    • a nationwide, retail-chain, employer for whom participant worked: “…checked social sites of employees for negative comments about the company. If caught making negative comments…employee would be immediately “fired.”
    • “… aware hackers could get into the profile site…”, so [participants] were careful what they posted – regardless of private or public profile settings
  • 20. Data Collection Indications…
    • Participants do have a cognitive awareness of content within social media profiles pivotal to interaction and communication
    • Aware of hazards of social posted content, language, photos
    • Used social media sites regularly - 100% used Facebook primarily
    • 82% aware future employers and schools may use social media sites in background check venue
  • 21.
    • Content showed commentary by the profile owners and ‘friends’ with application invitations or comments on applications
    • Commentary about reality TV shows or series; popular culture (music); name calling; joking
    • Posts ran no more than two lines long (10 to 16 words average)
    • Predominant use of ‘text messaging’ abbreviations or acronym spelling
    Data Collection Observations…
  • 22. Unacceptable Content Concerns
    • Only two agreed content possibly considered for deletion to avoid explaining to future employers as a negative hiring impact: “…I might take it off later…but for now, I’m OK with it…”.
    • Majority - they wouldn’t change a thing on social media sites or profiles.
  • 23. Researchers Assumptions Unfounded…
    • Millennials – basically have no intentions to ‘shock’ with gross, profane, or pornographic content on social sites
    • Well aware future employers and schools could check on them (as well as current employers)
    • Wise enough to ensure profiles set to private if they believe content might leak out to (Internet) public
    • Have a balanced life outside of Internet cyber-culture of online social media participation.
  • 24. Extrapolation…
    • Cyber-culture based millennials are not so different in a public venue online than they are off-line
    • Millennials leading ‘public lives on social media sites’ behave in a similar manner in which they behave in real life public spaces
    • One might expect millennials to be naïve about online public behavior (‘privlic’ or public) consequences, and who might see it, this group showed otherwise
  • 25. Further Research Recommendations
    • Have millennials been rejected for employment in large numbers based on activity online in social media or platforms; how has it affected their future (career / personal)?
    • Can metrics be extrapolated from this demographic to show how much of time is really spent online versus offline?
  • 26. Further Research Recommendations
    • How does millennials’ time spent on social media affect work, school, or ability to socialize in the real world?
    • Does online socializing increase scope of older teens in reaching out to global community?
    • Does online socializing provide a broader range of learning experience?
    • Have millennials been able to target networking capability for personal socialization into career networking, and if so, how?
  • 27. Research Study Conclusions…
    • Millennials are aware of social media content and feel content is ‘harmless’ to what might be seen in public platforms by a ‘private circle’ of friends or the public in general
    • Millennials are aware content may be seen by those who can determine their career/schools
    • Millennials learned content ‘political correctness’ from peers in the real world, as well as online cyber-communities
  • 28. Additional ‘Bonus’ Conclusions…
    • Millennials act and react online in the same or similar manner in which they would act in real life in public
    • Millennials use the same informal communication style online (digital) as in other tech-based platforms – text messaging, shorthand or acronym language

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