Challenges Biodiversity

214
-1

Published on

Presentation to Scottish Government Conference
"Future Common Agricultural Policy for Scotland"
Edinburgh, 16 March 2011

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
214
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Challenges Biodiversity

  1. 1. Rural Policy Centre Challenges for post-2013: biodiversity Davy McCracken Presentation to Scottish Government Conference Future Common Agricultural Policy for Scotland 1 Holyrood Hotel, Edinburgh, 16 March 2011
  2. 2. Biodiversity: not just “nice tohave” or a “luxury to support”Essential in underpinning the final ecosystem servicesassociated with our agricultural ecosystems From Norris et al. (forthcoming) Biodiversity. UK National Ecosystem Assessment
  3. 3. Biodiversity Challenges:Achieving an appropriate balance• Between Pillar 1 and Pillar 2: – need „greening‟ of Pillar 1 and agri- environment in Pillar 2• Between actions supported within Pillar 2: – need more emphasis on environment and better balance across actions funded 3
  4. 4. Biodiversity Challenges:Achieving an appropriate balanceThe ten SRDP Rural Priority options to which the most amount of funding had beencommitted by the end of March 2010 (SG website accessed 13/03/2011) Ranking based on Total amount Funding for funds Cases with of fundscommitted Option Description Option committed broad 1 Restructuring agricultural businesses (Axis biodiversity 1) 521 £42,923,667 Woodland creation - Native woodland actions c. 51% 2 planting (Axis 2) 466 £27,186,119 of funding of Hedgerows - 3 years for biodiversity 3 benefits (axis 2) 1085 £23,477,806 top 10 actions Open Grazed or Wet Grassland for Wildlife 4 (Axis 2) 1203 £19,269,763 5 Diversification Outwith Agriculture (Axis 3) 152 £16,795,472 6 Manure/slurry storage and treatment - Funding for all manure storage (Axis 1) 190 £9,473,002 7 Mown Grassland for Wildlife (Axis 2) 695 £8,690,519 broad 8 Development/Creation Of Micro-Enterprises biodiversity (Axis 3) 54 £7,720,262 actions c. 54% 9 Community services and facilities (Axis 3) 34 £6,831,300 Woodland creation - Mixed of funding of all 10 conifer/broadleaved woodland (Axis 2) 161 £6,663,302 actions Total amount of funds committed to these top 10 options: £169,031,212 Total amount of funds committed to options ranked 2, 3, 4, 7 & 10: £85,287,509 Overall total amount of funds committed to all 127 available options: £262,993,241 4Overall total amount of funds committed to all options with a biodiversity focus £141,829,631
  5. 5. Biodiversity Challenges:Achieving an appropriate balance• Between actions taken to address environmental concerns, e.g.: – Climate Change – Water Framework Directive – Delivery of Ecosystem Services – Biodiversity and 2020 targets “to halt biodiversity loss …. and …. restore them in so far as 5 feasible”
  6. 6. Biodiversity Challenges:Recognising scale of action needed • Intensification of management practices • Abandonment of management practices • Simplification of agricultural landscapes Intensity of agriculture Graph from presentation by: Hoogeveen Y.R., Petersen J.E. & Gabrielsen P. (2001). Agriculture and biodiversity in Europe. Background report to the High-Level European Conference on Agriculture and Biodiversity, 5–7 June, Paris. STRA-CO/AGRI (2001) 17. Council of Europe/UNEP.
  7. 7. Biodiversity Challenges:Recognising scale of action needed Scotland: 1995-2007 (BTO) Stable (but at low levels): • Linnet • Skylark • Starling • Yellowhammer Declined: • Curlew (-51%) • Kestrel (-38%) • Lapwing (-33%) • Meadow Pipit (-25%) UK Wild bird population index: 1970-2007Action needed in protected areas and wider countryside
  8. 8. Biodiversity Challenges:Recognising scale of action neededLowlands – fragmentation and loss of connectivity
  9. 9. Biodiversity Challenges:Recognising scale of action neededLowlands – fragmentation and loss of connectivity
  10. 10. Biodiversity Challenges:Recognising scale of action neededLowlands – fragmentation and loss of connectivity
  11. 11. Biodiversity Challenges:Recognising scale of action neededUplands and islands – changes and loss of High NatureValue farming systems 11
  12. 12. Biodiversity Challenges:Recognising scale of action neededUplands and islands – changes and loss of High NatureValue farming systems Need to establish baseline of how much HNV and where – Scottish Government working on this Need also to consider appropriate support mechanisms and policy framework required 12
  13. 13. Biodiversity Challenges: Joiningup the actions being taken• Need action in protected areas and wider countryside• Need „greening‟ of Pillar 1 and agri-environment in Pillar 2• Need appropriately targeted suites of complementary biodiversity actions on the ground• Need collaborative actions at the landscape-scale• Need greater focus on proactive follow-up once biodiversity actions are implemented• Need underlying policies and schemes to be flexible to allow for implementation of adaptive management – learning by doing
  14. 14. Biodiversity Challenges: Thestatus quo is not an option• If changes to the way that overall CAP support is targeted does not result in an increased focus on biodiversity actions and targeting these effectively, then in Scotland and across the rest of the EU 27: – natural and semi-natural habitats will continue to be lost within intensively farmed areas – HNV farming systems will continue to decline – the biodiversity that underpins the ecosystem services arising from EU agriculture, including production, will be adversely impacted – the resilience and capacity of EU farming systems to cope with shocks and pressures will be adversely impacted
  15. 15. Davy McCracken davy.mccracken@sac.ac.uk www.sac.ac.uk/ruralpolicycentre A briefing on Estimating the scale of future environmental land management requirements can be found at:http://www.sac.ac.uk/ruralpolicycentre/publs/changinenvironment/landmanagementrequirements/ 15
  16. 16. 16

×