Saudi dammam nov 2012

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  • Put this on the handout. Audience have to allocate words to one of three categories; ‘take’, ‘make’, ‘break’.Then have people stand at the front, each holding a card with either ‘take’, ‘have’, or ‘break’. Presenter calls out some other words, and a volunteer has to stand next to the right person, depending on whether they think it collocates with ‘take’, ‘have’, or ‘break’.
  • Put this on the handout. Audience have to allocate words to one of three categories; ‘take’, ‘have’, ‘break’.Then have people stand at the front, each holding a card with either ‘take’, ‘have’, or ‘break’. Presenter allocates each of these words to different volunteers. They each have to stand next to the right person, depending on whether they think it collocates with ‘take’, ‘have’, or ‘break’.
  • Put this on the handout. Audience have to allocate words to one of three categories; ‘take’, ‘have’, ‘break’.Then have people stand at the front, each holding a card with either ‘take’, ‘have’, or ‘break’. Presenter calls out some other words, and a volunteer has to stand next to the right person, depending on whether they think it collocates with ‘take’, ‘have’, or ‘break’.
  • Put this on the handout. Audience have to allocate words to one of three categories; ‘take’, ‘have’, ‘break’.Then have people stand at the front, each holding a card with either ‘take’, ‘make’, or ‘break’. Presenter calls out some other words, and a volunteer has to stand next to the right person, depending on whether they think it collocates with ‘take’, ‘make’, or ‘break’.
  • In class, you might do this with flashcards
  • Saudi dammam nov 2012

    1. 1. Saudi Electric CompanyTeacher TrainingNovember 24th – 26th 2012
    2. 2. Saturday 24th November Sunday 25th November Monday 26th November07.30 – 09.00 Session 1 Communicative Language Teaching Teaching Reading Classroom Management  Introductions  What do we read & why do we read it  Managing multi-level classes  Warmers  Problems & Strategies  Pair & Groupwork  Teacher Beliefs  Reading Techniques  Checking understanding  Challenges we face  What makes a good lesson BREAK09.15 – 10.45 Session 2 Presenting Grammar Teaching Speaking Teaching Writing  What is grammar?  Factors that inhibit speaking  Why teach writing  Deductive vs Inductive Approach  Speaking Activities  What do we write  Grammar from your coursebook  Assessing student speaking  What makes a good piece of writing  Writing Activities  Assessing student writing BREAK11.00 – 12.30 Session 3 Teaching & Learning Vocabulary Using Your Coursebook Effectively Lesson Planning  Why is learning vocabulary difficult?  What makes a good coursebook  Principles of Lesson Planning  Our experience as language learners  Successful language learning  Planning a model lesson from  Techniques for teaching vocabulary  Motivating your students your coursebooks  Dealing with unknown words (Planning a ‘model’ lesson  Recording new vocabulary incorporating ideas and techniques learned on the course) PRAYER13.00 – 14.00 Session 4 Grammar Practice Activities Bringing variety to your teaching Course Review & Feedback  Timelines  Games & activities  Trainees present their ‘model’  Substitution Tables  Exploiting the internet lesson  Games  Course review and feedback  Q&A
    3. 3. Your Trainer Your trainer for this training course will be Mr. David Quartermain. You can call him David David was born in England, and educated at Canterbury and Cambridge in England, and Indiana and Virginia in the USA. He has an M.A. degree in Political Science, and a Diploma in Teaching English as a Foreign Language to Adults (DELTA). Before becoming a teacher, David worked as a Market Research Executive for five years in the city of London. However, he got tired of working in such a large city, and in 1991 became a primary school teacher working with students aged 8-9. In 1992 he left the UK to teach English. His first job was in Greece; a beautiful country with a wonderful climate and excellent food. Later, David worked in Poland and Vietnam before moving to Macau in 2003. Macau is part of China, very near to Hong Kong. He now works as a teacher-trainer, helping teachers across China to improve their classroom techniques. He has worked in many countries, but this is his first visit to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. David particularly enjoys the food here. He is very much looking forward to being your trainer for this course.
    4. 4. Your Colleagues 1) Is the youngest 2) Has been a teacher the longest 3) Speaks the most languages 4) Has visited the most countries 5) Was born the nearest to here 6) Has the most letters in their name 7) Is the tallest 8) Enjoys teaching the most 9) Is the heaviest smoker 10) Was born in November
    5. 5. Teacher Beliefs 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 It is hard to motivate students to learn English Whenever students make mistakes the teacher should correct them Tests and exams show clearly how much English a student has learnt A coursebook must always be followed exactly A teacher of English must have excellent English themselves Students who don’t do homework are lazy In a class of mixed levels, it is best to teach to the highest level The role of the teacher changes in lessons, and from lesson to lesson The teacher should stand at the front of the class when teaching Classrooms are noisy, busy places
    6. 6. Teacher Beliefs Dictionary Definition: ‘A successful lesson’ /sək’sesfəl ‘lesən/ 1. 2. 3.
    7. 7. Teacher Beliefs Class size Your own language ability Low student motivation Poor Coursebook Poor classroom Lack of teacher training opportunities Lack of teaching resources / equipment Lack of time for classes / preparation Low student ability Other …………………………………………
    8. 8. Teacher Beliefs Your role Your classroom Boss Hospital Friend Prison Advisor Library Motivator Supermarket Organiser Factory Judge Laboratory Resource Theatre Performer Paradise
    9. 9. Teacher Beliefs
    10. 10. PresentingGrammar
    11. 11. Presenting GrammarDiscuss• What is grammar?• Do you like teaching grammar?• Do your students like learning grammar?• Why do we teach grammar?
    12. 12. Presenting Grammar 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10Students need to be given detailed grammar rules if they are to learn a language successfully Knowing grammar is essential for effective communication Grammar is usually the most boring part of learning a foreign language Grammar should be taught and practised ‘in context’
    13. 13. Presenting Grammar Implicit Knowledge Explicit Knowledge  ability to sort incoming language  ability to describe acceptable into manageable chunks utterances and rules  ability to infer relationships  ability to disqualify unacceptable between language chunks utterances and identify errors  ability to generate original language  ability to form rules & develop in real time systems A The teacher sets the students a task to B The teacher gives an example of a new do, e.g. writing ‘rules’ for visitors to their city. structure on the board, e.g. “I had been They then listen to people talking about rules running for 20 minutes when I felt a pain in and regulations, and what they must or can or my left foot.” The teacher explains the form mustn’t do. and the rules for using the structure. The The students observe, analyse and compare students make sentences using the new examples of language and meaning. The structure based on picture cues in the text students are guided to understanding a range book. They are given more sentences to write of modal verbs used for giving rules and for homework. regulations. Inductive Deductive
    14. 14. Presenting Grammar A BTaken from Workplace Plus Book 1 Unit 5. Pearson/Longman. Taken from Cutting Edge Elementary. Pearson/Longman.Author: Joan Saslow and Tim Collins Author: Sarah Cunningham & Peter Moor
    15. 15. Presenting Grammar The deductive approachWhat are the possible advantages? …And the disadvantages?1: Gets to the point quickly 1: Concepts may be ‘over their heads’2: Respects intelligence / maturity of students 2: Teacher explanation is often at the expense of student involvement3: Confirms students’ expectations of language learning 3: Explanations are seldom memorable
    16. 16. Presenting Grammar Ingredients for a successful grammar lesson  Personalise the activity  Provide comprehension work to allow noticing of the grammar targets  Use a real communicative task as the basis of the lesson  Give students a chance to re-try the task  Focus on student errors they involve the target structure or interfere with meaning  Have a grammar reference summary available at the end of the lesson
    17. 17. Presenting Grammar So how good is your grammar? Decide if the sentences below are ‘correct’ or ‘wrong’ 1. If that’s the time, we’re late! 2. With whom are you going out tonight? 3. Never in the field of 4. Knowing you, you’ll get this one wrong! human conflict has so much been owed by so many, to so few. 5. Should anyone call, tell them I’ll be back at 4. Gee, I’m really sorry. Brad’s 6. not here. He just went to the 7. The teacher asked Ahmed to try and do mall. better The taxi arrived while the 8. luggage was carrying down
    18. 18. (Taken from Technical English 2 Unit 6 Pearson/Longman Author: David Bonamy)
    19. 19. Teaching & LearningVocabulary
    20. 20. Teaching & Learning Vocabulary • Is teaching vocabulary necessary? • Is teaching vocabulary easy? • Is learning vocabulary easy? • How good are you at remembering new vocabulary?
    21. 21. Teaching & Learning Vocabulary 500 words – Average native-speaker uses500,000 words in OED 15-20,000 14,000 meanings
    22. 22. Teaching & Learning Vocabulary bankBank (n) [C] A place to store money.Bank (n) The side of a river.Bank (v) Something you can rely on “You can bank on the bank by the bank.”
    23. 23. Teaching & Learning Vocabulary set
    24. 24. Teaching & Learning Vocabulary
    25. 25. Teaching & Learning Vocabulary Hasta la vista!Think of words orphrases that you りがとうremember learning in (Arigatō)a foreign language Mamma Mia! Why do you think you remember them? je taime!
    26. 26. Teaching & Learning Vocabulary ? How can we improve the learning process
    27. 27. Teaching & Learning VocabularyDo you teach every word in the same way? tired
    28. 28. Teaching & Learning Vocabulary phone snake bird toothbrush chalk keys childhood ice-cream water Your boss!
    29. 29. Teaching & Learning Vocabulary Appeal to visual learners
    30. 30. Teaching & Learning VocabularyVisual Learners Write things down To stay focused, look at people who talk to you …………………………………………………………………………… …………………………………………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………………………Auditory Learners Study ‘out loud’ with a friend Ask for oral instructions if you don’t understand …………………………………………………………………………… …………………………………………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………………………Kinaesthetic LearnersWalk around the room while you are learningTake short breaks often (about every 20 minutes)Highlight or underline your notes or draw things on them………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
    31. 31. Teaching & Learning Vocabulary Techniques for introducing new vocabulary Definition Translation Dictionary Synonyms Picture Mime / Gesture Realia Guessing from context ………………………………….. …………………………………..
    32. 32. Teaching & Learning Vocabulary How would you establish meaning for the following words? 1 punch 2 pleased 3 tanker slap happy yacht smack ecstatic dhow hit delighted cruise liner kick over the moon battleship 4 doctor 5 promote 6 woollen accountant resign cotton engineer retire nylon miner lay off leather lawyer get the sack plastic
    33. 33. Teaching & Learning Vocabulary Dealing with unknown words Renowned curator Jacques Sauniere staggered through the vaulted archway of the museum’s Grand Gallery. He lunged for the nearest painting he could see, a Caravaggio. Grabbing the gilded frame, the seventy-six-year-old man heaved the masterpiece toward himself until it tore from the wall and Sauniere collapsed backward in a heap beneath the canvas. As he had anticipated, a thundering iron gate fell nearby, barricading the entrance to the suite. The parquet floor shook. Far off, an alarm began to ring. The curator lay a moment, gasping for breath, taking stock. I am still alive. He crawled out from under the canvas and scanned the cavernous space for somewhere to hide. A voice spoke, chillingly close. “……………………………………………”
    34. 34. Teaching & Learning Vocabulary
    35. 35. Teaching & Learning Vocabulary Word Pron Translation Grammar Use Example Memory Aidriver / rɪv ə / Noun [C] The River + name - The river flows through River bed my village River bank Shallow / Deep - The river is Wide / Narrow very wide and deepshipswim
    36. 36. Grammar PracticeActivities
    37. 37. Grammar Practice Activities Present Simple Present Continuous / Progressive Present Perfect Past Simple Past Continuous / Progressive Past Perfect Future Simple Future Continuous / Progressive Future Perfect Past Perfect Continuous Present Perfect Continuous Future Perfect Continuous Past Present Future
    38. 38. Grammar Practice Activities Grammar Auction: You have 1,000 Riyal. What grammar will you choose to buy? 1) Its seven twenty oclock 2) What are you going to do in this morning 3) It was so beautiful a day that we went swimming 4) Burglars broke in the house while the owner was on holiday 5) I recommend you to take a long vacation 6) Let’s make fire 7) It’s strange that you should say this 8) You might want to have a word with him 9) Because I didn’t know him, so I didn’t say anything 10) He took some students in to earn some extra money
    39. 39. Grammar Practice Activities homework chicken child wood biscuit equipment C Both U
    40. 40. Grammar Practice Activities Substitution Tables: Pronoun Auxiliary Main (Article) Noun verb verb He is playing football She You We They
    41. 41. TeachingReading
    42. 42. Teaching Reading Things you read in English Things you read in ArabicThings your students read in English Why they read them
    43. 43. Teaching Reading Are your students good readers? Terrible Excellent 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Factors that help Factors that hinder1. Motivation to read (acquire knowledge) ……………………………………. 1. Different alphabet …………………………………….2. Graded input in textbooks ……………………………………. 2. Too many unknown words …………………………………….3. Reading is a natural part of education ……………………………………. 3. Exposed to narrow variety of texts …………………………………….4. ……………………………………. Good study habits 4. Unfamiliar topic matter …………………………………….5. Teacher input ……………………………………. 5. Poor reading techniques …………………………………….
    44. 44. Teaching Reading How do we read? a) You read a poem by your favourite poet and pay close attention to the poet’s use of language. intensive …………………………………………………………………………………………………… b) You visit a library in the course of researching a particular topic and quickly look through books and magazines to see whether they have valuable information. scanning …………………………………………………………………………………………….…... c) You are relaxing at home and sit down to read the latest novel by your favourite writer in your mother tongue. You can take your time extensive ..…………………………………………………………………………… d) You’ve been given a copy of the training course schedule and course outline. skimming ………………………………………………………………………………………………….… e) You read the weather forecast in your newspaper to find out the temperature tomorrow. scanning .……………………………………………………………………………………………………
    45. 45. Teaching Reading Effective or Ineffective Strategies I/E a) Using your finger to help your eyes follow lines of text ………………… I b) Read each word very carefully in order to understand the entire text ………………… I c) Mouthing the text silently/quietly to yourself as you read. ………………… ? d) Look at titles, subtitles, pictures, and other visuals before reading E ..................... e) Using context to establish meaning of an unfamiliar word ………………… E f) Mentally translating everything ………………… I g) Mentally translating paragraph if complicated language has led to confusion ………………… E h) Trying to identify the connections between sentences and paragraphs E (through markers such as ‘however’, ‘consequently’) ………………… i) Find the sentence that contains the main idea. E ………………… j) Asking the teacher whenever an unfamiliar word is encountered. I ………………… k) Using a dictionary to find the meaning of all new words I ………………… l) Writing the meaning of new words in L1 in margin of page. I ………………… m) Underlining or highlighting unfamiliar words. I ………………… n) Creating some questions for yourself before you read which you think or hope E the text will answer. ………………… 0) Asking a student to read the text out loud in class. ? …………………
    46. 46. Teaching ReadingEnhancing the Reading Process Pre-Reading Arouses interest in topic, motivates students, provides a reason to read, prepares language Introductory discussion; brainstorm the topic; prediction from title, headline or key vocabulary; examine pictures; students generate questions While Reading encourages type of skill appropriate to text; helps with understanding Skim: order pictures / paragraphs, match title to paragraph Scan: T/F questions, tick list, fill in chart, correct/false statements Intensive/extensive: multiple choice, fill in chart, cloze, students write questions (e.g. for other students) or answer comprehension questions, jigsaw reading Post-Reading Consolidate language, exploit topic, relate to students’ own interests / views / knowledge Practice other skills (discussion, role play, summary writing, projects, write an answer)… Language (analysis of style, grammar, cohesion, find a word that means...)
    47. 47. Teaching Reading
    48. 48. TeachingSpeaking
    49. 49. Teaching Speaking
    50. 50. Teaching Speaking Why are students reluctant to speak? lack of vocabulary lack of grammatical knowledge fear of making mistakes (loss of face) fear of what the teacher will say shyness poor listening skills lack of topic knowledge lack of motivation (what’s the reward?) perception (it’s ‘chatting’ not ‘learning’)
    51. 51. Teaching SpeakingThe teacherwon’t stoptalking!
    52. 52. Teaching Speaking What’s the solution? Personalise it!
    53. 53. Teaching Speaking“In personalized learning, learners are given space to bring their own experiences,attitudes, and feelings into the learning process. Learning is thus made moremeaningful and real, and learners are able to make systematic connections betweentheir own lives and the life of the classroom.When learning is personalized, content is processed more deeply, and learnerindependence and autonomy are fostered.” Dr David Nunan
    54. 54. Teaching SpeakingWhat’s the solution? choice of topic sport food cars work world politics
    55. 55. Teaching Speaking angrysad happy confused tired
    56. 56. Teaching SpeakingWhat’s the solution? preparation time
    57. 57. Teaching SpeakingWhat’s the solution? group practice first
    58. 58. Teaching SpeakingWhat’s the solution? use a modelA: Dzien dobry Jak sie masz?B: Dobrze
    59. 59. Teaching SpeakingWhat’s the solution? make speaking meaningful
    60. 60. Teaching Speaking
    61. 61. Teaching Speaking You’re stuck in a desert. Which piece of equipment would you find most useful? torchcosmetic mirror parachute water knife bottle
    62. 62. Teaching Speaking
    63. 63. Teaching Speaking The Tree Climbing Game
    64. 64. Teaching Speaking
    65. 65. Teaching Speaking
    66. 66. Teaching Speaking
    67. 67. Teaching Speaking Error Korrekshun I try to correct errors as little as I never let my students make possible. I want my students to express mistakes. If they say anything themselves in English without worrying wrong, I stop them and make too much about making mistakes. them say it correctly. Sometimes I notice points that everyone I don’t want them to learn bad gets wrong and deal with them later - but English from each other. I never interrupt students to correct them.
    68. 68. Teaching SpeakingThere are 5 decisions a teacher has to make when encountering oral errors or mistakes:1. Decide what kind of error / mistake has been made (grammar? pronunciation?)2. Decide whether to deal with it (is it useful to correct it?).3. Decide when to deal with it (now, end of activity, later?).4. Decide who will correct it (teacher, student self correction, other students?).5. Decide on an appropriate technique to indicate that an error has occurred or to enable correction.
    69. 69. Teaching SpeakingWhat’s the solution? error correction self-correction peer correction correct individually later praise before criticism ignore
    70. 70. Teaching Speaking Match the error / mistake with its description: Error/Mistake Description1. He like this school. a) pronunciation ( / ɪ/ vs / i: / )2. Where you did go yesterday? b) pronunciation ( / ʃ/vs / ʧ/ )3. The secretary is in THE office. c) pronunciation (word stress)4. Give me one bread! d) grammar (wrong tense)5. I eat shocolate every day. e) vocabulary (incorrect collocation)6. After three years they made a divorce. f) grammar (subject-verb agreement)7. I am here since Tuesday. g) grammar (word order)8. I’m going to heat you. h) vocabulary (incorrect word and rude!)
    71. 71. Using yourCoursebook Effectively
    72. 72. Using your coursebook effectively  Think about the books you use to teach English at your school • Who chooses them – yourself or somebody else? Who? • Do you like using them? Why / why not? • What is the best book you’ve ever used? Why was it so good? • Now think about the worst book you’ve used – why was it so bad?  What makes a good coursebook?  How important is the coursebook in determining whether your students succeed in learning English? Not at all Extremely Important important 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
    73. 73. Using your coursebook effectively Authentic  What authentic materials do you use in your teaching? Materials  What advantages / disadvantages do they have over coursebooks?  How do you exploit them?
    74. 74. Using your coursebook effectivelyWhat other factors determine whether your students become successful language learners?• The Teacher’s own language ability• The Teacher’s qualifications• The Teacher’s teaching experience• Whether the students like and respect the teacher• Student motivation• The learning environment (quality of classrooms)• Availability of learning resources (computers, library, etc)• The importance of English for the student’s future career• Exposure to English outside the classroom• Desire to get high marks in exams• Family expectations• Interest in British & American culture / people• Other………………………………………………………………
    75. 75. Using your coursebook effectively Intrinsic Motivation Extrinsic MotivationThis is caused by factors within the This is shaped by factors outside thestudent. For example, a person might be individual. For example the student might bemotivated simply because they enjoy the motivated by the need to get a job, pass anlearning process, because they are exam, study overseas or to please hernaturally competitive, or because they parents.desire the praise and satisfaction of doingsomething well. The teacher can do a lotto increase or reduce a student’s intrinsicmotivation.
    76. 76. Using your coursebook effectively Puzzle TimeThere are 19 people.18 are children, 1 is an adult.They need to cross a river.None of them can swim.There are no bridges.There is only one canoe.Only 3 people can fit in the canoe at one time.1 of the 3 must be the adult.How many trips across the river will be needed to geteveryone to the other side of the river ?
    77. 77. Using your coursebook effectively 17
    78. 78. Using your coursebook effectively • Re-read the problem several times • Visualised the problem in your head• Drew a picture or diagram of the problem • Used a mathematical formula • Came up with a wrong answer first • Talked with someone else while working • Thought about it before writing something down • Asked someone else for help • Decided not to do it !
    79. 79. Using your coursebook effectively Golden Rules I can achieve this by …1 Set a personal example with your own behaviour as a teacher Don’t be lazy.2 Create a pleasant, relaxed atmosphere in the classroom Be friendly3 Present tasks properly Present new language, use instructions effectively, move from presentation to practice4 Develop a good relationship with the learners Be nice5 Increase learners’ linguistic self-confidence Praise and encourage6 Make the language classes interesting Interesting, varied lessons and activities7 Promote learner autonomy Don’t be too dominant and help with learning strategies8 Personalise the learning process Make it relevant to learners9 Increase the learners’ goal-orientedness Add some challenge10 Familiarise learners with target language culture Add some cultural aspects of English11 Include regular groupwork in your class Work on getting groups and interaction in class12 Help students realise that it is mainly their effort that is needed for Be tough on them! success13 Emphasise the usefulness of the language Explain how learning ‘x’ will help ‘y’Your suggestion:
    80. 80. Bringing Variety to your Teaching
    81. 81. Bringing Variety to your Teaching a chance notes an exam a rest the bed
    82. 82. Bringing Variety to your Teaching Take … a chance notes an exam a rest the bed
    83. 83. Bringing Variety to your Teaching Make … a chance notes an exam a rest the bed
    84. 84. Bringing Variety to your Teaching Break … a chance notes an exam a rest the bed
    85. 85. Bringing Variety to your Teaching How often do you…? Make a acomplaint Break a aholiday Take athe law Break promise Take Make chance list
    86. 86. Bringing Variety to your Teaching Travel through the maze using only those words with first syllable stress () 4 6 2 3 hamburger Egypt banana students answer apple weather 6 7 4 9 Saturday regular tomorrow results pronounce started remember 6 9 Motorola possible Saudi another Tokyo customer Manchester 6 4 7 3 1 passenger Microsoft already government photograph teacher luckily 1 2 Africa unhappy football monument Toyota Lebanon bicycle 5 5 7 9 4 0 relative telephone afterwards Nokia unlucky dictionary Mercedes 7 5 8 Arabia remember computer language Egyptian opposite hospital FINISH
    87. 87. Bringing Variety to your Teaching Travel through the maze using only those words with first syllable stress () 4 6 2 3 hamburger Egypt banana students answer apple weather 6 7 4 9 Saturday regular tomorrow results pronounce started remember 6 9 Motorola possible Saudi another Tokyo customer Manchester 6 4 7 3 1 passenger Microsoft already government photograph teacher luckily 1 2 Africa unhappy football monument Toyota Lebanon bicycle 5 5 7 9 4 0 relative telephone afterwards Nokia unlucky dictionary Mercedes 7 5 8 Arabia remember computer language Egyptian opposite hospital FINISH (00-853) 66 55 77 14
    88. 88. Bringing Variety to your Teaching ✔/ ʊ/ sound ✘ / uː/ sound SHOOT FOOD BOOK YOU BOOT GROUP FULL MOOD FRUIT TWO SPOON SCHOOL GOOD COULD SOUP SHOE ZOO CHOOSE BEAUTIFUL FOOT MUSA LOOK WOULD MAHMOUD THROUGH PULLEY THREW MENU AFTERNOON UNIFORM WOOL MOON FOOTBALL WOOD TOOTHPASTE NEWSPAPER COOKER SOUVENIR TUESDAY PULL TOOL SUPERMARKET SHOOT SHOULD CHEW
    89. 89. Bringing Variety to your Teaching ✔/ ʊ/ sound ✘ / uː/ sound SHOOT FOOD BOOK YOU BOOT GROUP FULL MOOD FRUIT TWO SPOON SCHOOL GOOD COULD SOUP SHOE ZOO CHOOSE BEAUTIFUL FOOT MUSA LOOK WOULD MAHMOUD THROUGH PULLEY THREW MENU AFTERNOON UNIFORM WOOL MOON FOOTBALL WOOD TOOTHPASTE NEWSPAPER COOKER SOUVENIR TUESDAY PULL TOOL SUPERMARKET SHOOT SHOULD CHEW
    90. 90. Bringing Variety to your Teaching Blockbusters 1 11 21 6 16 2 12 22 7 17 3 13 23 8 18 4 14 24 9 19 5 15 25 10 20
    91. 91. Bringing Variety to your TeachingUsing movie clips
    92. 92. Bringing Variety to your TeachingBrainstorm  What “new” technology do you use to communicate in your day-to-day life?  How many of these do your students also use?  How many of these have you used as a teaching aid?  How can ‘new’ technology enhance the learning experience?
    93. 93. Bringing Variety to your Teaching www.discoveryeducation.com/teachers
    94. 94. Bringing Variety to your Teaching www.bellenglish.com/
    95. 95. Bringing Variety to your Teaching http://elllo.org/
    96. 96. Bringing Variety to your Teaching http://www.natcorp.ox.ac.uk/
    97. 97. Bringing Variety to your Teaching “…it is inconceivable that any two students will have exactly the same knowledge of English at any one time. Even if we were able to assemble a class of complete beginners, it would soon be clear that some were learning faster than others – or learning different things.” ‘The Practice of English Language Teaching’ (4th Ed.) Jeremy Harmer (Longman 2007)
    98. 98. Bringing Variety to your Teaching Teaching Mixed Ability Classes • On average, how many students do you have in each class? • How is it decided which students go into which class? • How big a range of ability does any one class have? • What challenges are there when teaching mixed-ability classes?
    99. 99. Bringing Variety to your Teaching Consider how answers are elicited. Rather than asking students to raise their hand if they know the answer (which allows strong students to dominate), write questions on the board and have students discuss them in pairs/groups. Teacher allows students enough time to complete exercises in their book. Then elicits answers verbally in front of the whole class. Try to first see which questions weaker students have answered correctly and make sure you ask them to read their answers for these questions. Give stronger students additional roles. They can act as ‘mentor’ for weaker students, or help you check answers for other students near them. Such ‘peer teaching’ can create a more positive learning environment. Not all students need to be set the same tasks or asked the same questions. Less able students can be assigned easier tasks that will generate the same feeling of satisfaction when they are completed successfully. More able students can be given additional tasks / questions. Your suggestion 1 Your Suggestion 2 The best idea from your colleagues
    100. 100. Bringing Variety to your TeachingPair & Group work  How often do you use pair & group work in your teaching?  What kind of activities do you use them for?  How do your learners feel about these kinds of activities?
    101. 101. Bringing Variety to your Teaching The advantages of group and pairwork activities are: • There is an element of cooperation between learners; responsibilities are shared • Learners participate more equally in groupwork • Learner participation is maximised; particularly in pairwork • ……………………………………………………………………………… • ……………………………………………………………………………… •……………………………………………………………………………… However, there are also some challenges to these methods: • Learners may have partner preferences • Learners revert to L1 • ……………………………………………………………………………… • ………………………………………………………………………………
    102. 102. Bringing Variety to your TeachingTips for setting up and running pair work & group work more effectively:• Explain to your learners the value of such an activity• Provide instructions as a ‘whole class’ first• Ensure learners understand that fluency is more important than accuracy• Move away from the centre/front of the room• Keep a record of errors, particularly related to the target language• Notice students who are doing a good job, and praise them at the end• Give students in a group specific roles• Remind groups how long they have to complete the activity
    103. 103. ClassroomManagement
    104. 104. Classroom Management How can you check that students understand the meaning of newly taught vocabulary? “Do you understand?” What is wrong with the teacher saying:
    105. 105. Classroom Management CCQ’s Concept checking involves asking simple questions using the new word or phrase. In the example below, the teacher is checking the word ‘bakery’. Consider the statement: “I managed to find an apartment.” This means: - I experienced difficulty in finding an apartment - Despite the difficulty, I found one In simpler language: - I found an apartment - It wasn’t easy! Changed into CCQ’s: Q: Did I find an apartment? Q: Was it easy?(picture from pg 28 of Tasks for Teacher Education)
    106. 106. Classroom Management What structure do these concept checking questions ask for?• Q: When did he start learning Arabic? (3 months ago) Q: Is he (still) learning Arabic now? (yes) Q: Will he continue in the future? (probably) Present Perfect Continuous Structure: __________________• Q: Is it heavy? (yes) Q: Can he carry it? (no) Structure: __________________ + verb Too + adjective + to• Q: Did he go to university when he was 17? (no) Q: Was it possible for him to go to university when he was 17? (yes) Could have + past participle Structure: __________________
    107. 107. Classroom ManagementOops! What’s wrong with these concept checking questions?1) I’ve known Omar since university. - Do I know Omar? - Do I like Omar? -What did we study at university?2) A wardrobe - Is it made from wood? - Is there one in your house? - Is there one in your bedroom?3) He managed to open the window. - Did he manage to open the window? - Why did he open the window?4) If he hadn’t overslept, he would have caught the plane. - What would have happened if he hadn’t overslept? - Why did he oversleep?5) He’s always falling asleep. - With regard to the narcoleptic condition the subject apparently presents, does the speaker, in your opinion, consider said subject’s habit of falling asleep always, or possibly just too often for the speaker’s liking, as verging on the annoying to the point of irritation?
    108. 108. Classroom Management You have just presented the following new words in a lesson. Construct concept questions for each one. - Glasses - Picnic - Favourite - I’m playing tennis with my brother tomorrow - Cosy - Cushion
    109. 109. Teaching Writing
    110. 110. Teaching Writing What have you written in Arabic in the past week?What have you asked your students to write in English?
    111. 111. Teaching Writingstudents younew words SMSgap-fills e-mailsfinish the sentence shopping liststranslations reminders / notesletters blogstests
    112. 112. Teaching WritingDo youyour studentswritingwriting? Do enjoy giving enjoy assignments? Why not?
    113. 113. Teaching Writing
    114. 114. Teaching Writing Why should we teach writing ?
    115. 115. Teaching Writing allows learners time to think It’s safer suits different than speaking learner styles WRITING is a ‘real life’ shows progress skill integrates other skills valid assessment
    116. 116. Teaching WritingPut the following writing activities in order of difficulty for your students:a) Guided writing, where the teacher gives help with compositions by discussing ideas, ordering, then choosing appropriate vocabulary, etc.b) Doing exercises, e.g. gap-fill, complete the sentence, etc. (controlled)c) Free writing, where the teacher gives a title and a word limit and invites the students to write.d) Copying, where the teacher asks students to copy down something the teacher has written on the board.Where would you place these activities on this scale?easy difficult Copying Doing exercises Guided writing Free writing Which of the above activities focus on accuracy and which on fluency?
    117. 117. Teaching Writing Writing Activity Examples: Identify whether the following activities are copying, controlled, guided or free: Copying __________ Copying tables from the board Guided __________ Paragraph building (opening and closing sentences are given. Students fill in missing details) Free __________ Writing a narrative from a series of pictures Controlled __________ Students transform a series of sentences into a coherent paragraph by inserting linkers where needed Guided __________ Complete the story (e.g. give the beginning, and students have to complete the text) Controlled __________ Gap filling from given choices Free __________ Write a letter applying for a job stating: where the advert was posted, personal details, qualifications Guided __________ Paragraph to be constructed by re-ordering given sentences
    118. 118. Teaching Writing1. Conventions – respecting conventions of overall shape, layout, ordering, syntax etc..2. Vocabulary – using accurate and appropriate lexical items3. Cohesion – using correct and appropriate markers such as linking expressions, grammatical references (this, his), etc..4. Punctuation and use of capital letters5. Communicatibility – achieving the communicative aim of the writing6. Grammar – using a range of grammatical structures accurately and appropriately7. Spelling8. Coherence – referring intelligibly to external factors (e.g., the shop) and using logical arguments9. Register – Does it set the right tone?
    119. 119. Teaching WritingYou have lost some sunglasses which you borrowed fromyour English friend, David. Write a note to David.Hello David! I writtin to appollogisebecause I lost your red sunglases.Sorry I don’t know how lost. Yastordayin the evening after skool I go to bay anew ones. Sorry. Bye buy David. __%
    120. 120. Teaching Writing medals missions
    121. 121. Teaching WritingHello David! I writtin to appollogisebecause I lost your red sunglases.Sorry I don’t know how lost. Yastordayin the evening after skool I go to bay anew ones. Sorry. Bye buy David.
    122. 122. Teaching Writing1) Correction Codes gr = grammar ww = wrong word mw = missing word sp = spelling t = tense wo = word order p = punctuation Ugh = horrible!  = I’m going to phone your father!
    123. 123. Teaching Writing5) Team-Work4) Don’t mark it!2) Whole-class3) Peer-Editing feedback Official Cheating Time!
    124. 124. Teaching Writing Sentence StemsOnce upon a time there was a _________________ .The ____________ lived _________________ .The ____________ was very ________________ .But _____ was also very _________________ .So one day, _______ decided to _________________ .
    125. 125. Teaching Writing Sentence StemsOf all the ___________________ in the world.I would recommend that you __________________________.In the first place, ________________ .More importantly, _________________ .On top of that, _________________ .Overall then, my advice to you is _________________ .
    126. 126. Teaching Writing Sentence completion • In thehappiestyears, … going to …. Waiter, was have ………… Excusecan 10 when tell Hi! How me,Ican you I’m …… I wish watching ………… me the ………… love my students would feel next your the …………
    127. 127. Teaching Writing Substitution tables My is very
    128. 128. Teaching Writing
    129. 129. Teaching Writing A long time ago, there was a poor man in a small village. He had an orange tree in his garden. One day, he found one of his oranges was much bigger than the others. It was as big as a football. The poor man took the orange to the king.
    130. 130. Before students write• Brainstorm content ideas• Show similar examples• Give key vocabulary• Give framework sentences around which they build examples• Minimise the task
    131. 131. After students write• Comment on what you liked about the writing• Give specific ways to improve• Compare with a model answer• Read / display good student writing• Give an opportunity to re-write
    132. 132. Lesson Planning
    133. 133. Lesson Planning Lesson Plan Ingredients  Timing  Class profile  Assumed knowledge  Materials  Procedures  Interaction  Main aims  Stage aims  Anticipated problems Is there anything else you think should be included in a lesson plan? ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
    134. 134. Lesson Planning Look at the following sentences. Where in the lesson plan would you put them?Stage aim a) The second part of the lesson will try to teach the students how to pronounce the new words.Materials b) New Interchange, by Jack Richards, Cambridge University Press, Unit 3Class Profile c) There are 14 students in the group, aged between 15 and 17.Main aim d) To teach the form and meaning of the 1st conditional.Interaction e) Student to Student in groups of 3.Timing f) 15 minutes. g) They did the present continuous in Unit 2, so they should know how to form a continuousAssumed Knowledge tense.Procedures h) I will write a model sentence on the board and ask students to give me other example sentences.Anticipated i) Two of the students were absent from the last lesson, so they may not understand the first part of today’s lesson.Problems
    135. 135. Lesson Planning Look at the aims below and decide if they are satisfactory as they stand, or whether they need amending or supporting with further information. Rewrite the ones you don’t like. a) To improve students listening skills. ✘ b) To read the text on page 31 of Workplace Plus Book 2. ✘ ✔ c) To encourage better student co-operation and interaction. i.e. to help the class gel. d) To extend students’ knowledge of and ability to use adjectives of character. ✔ e) To help students use dictionaries. ✘
    136. 136. Lesson PlanningAnticipating Problems.What problems do you think students might have with the following items of language? i) ii) iii) Would you I’ve got to do Hold on a mind if I some work minute ! smoked tonight. here?
    137. 137. Lesson PlanningIntroduce your class profile, the background to the lesson, and your overall aim(s)Stage Time Aim Procedure Interaction Materials1.2.3.4.5
    138. 138. Course Review & Feedback
    139. 139. Course Review & Feedback  Your Model Lesson  Course Review & Feedback  Q&A
    140. 140. Any Questions?
    141. 141. David Quartermaindavidq@ipm.edu.moBell Educational Services Ltd2012

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