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Classroom management dq 2013
 

Classroom management dq 2013

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  • Work in Macau – how many of you have been there? But Macau is very small, so I like to go to conferences often
  • Well, they imagine you probably have very few students. All of them incredibly eager to answer the teacher’s every question, and to participate in every activity. Is this the classroom you work in? No, mine neither. Instead, the reality is more like…..
  • Noisy Layout of desks / seats Nobody paying attention to the teacher
  • 4 classrooms. Audience decides if they represent ‘good’ classrooms’. Answer: Without good classroom management, all of these could be a disaster.
  • One of these is inherently different from all the rest. Discipline! Because this is something which is largely dealt with during the lesson, whereas the others are largely managed pre-lesson
  • + maybe 1% family / home environment
  • 6) Be friendly, not friends
  • www.superteachertools.com
  • So how do we be consistent? Major has 8 rules (next slide)
  • Notice that this is not one of Major’s rules!
  • www.superteachertools.com
  • These are not printed on handout
  • These are not printed on handout
  • Try to lower the noise level
  • Try to lower the noise level
  • Try to lower the noise level
  • Responsibility / control. You’re the boss!
  • Responsibility / control. You’re the boss!
  • Notice that this is not one of Major’s rules!
  • How is the relationship between the teacher and the students likely to vary in each case? How will it affect the classroom atmosphere? Which arrangements are most conducive to the teacher remaining in control? In which situation will the teacher dominate most? What will his/her role be in each case? Which arrangements are best for students to be able to talk to each other? How will the size of the group affect the arrangement? What activities might be suitable for each arrangement?
  • Seating arrangements can determine: How students feel about each other How they feel about the teacher How the teacher feels about them How students (and teacher) interact The types of activities that can be performed
  • Seating arrangements can determine: How students feel about each other How they feel about the teacher How the teacher feels about them How students (and teacher) interact The types of activities that can be performed
  • http://www.personalisedrewardcharts.co.uk http://www.slideshare.net/elphintcahgebleg/managing-classroom-behavior-and-discipline-jim-walters-et-all

Classroom management dq 2013 Classroom management dq 2013 Presentation Transcript

  • David QuartermainMPI-Bell Centre of EnglishMay 2013Classroom ManagementHow to create an effective, stress-free classroom
  • Pick me!A typical day at Bell Thailand
  • Have you ever felt like this?
  • What kind of‘classroom management’ problemshave you experienced?
  • Why are these bad classrooms?
  • Are these good classrooms?WARNING!Without Classroom Management,all of these classes could be a disaster!
  • What is‘classroom management’?Classroom management nThe ways in which student behaviour, movement, interaction etc.,during a class is organised and controlled by the teacher (or sometimesby the learners themselves) to enable teaching to take place moreeffectively.Longman Dictionary ofLanguage Teaching & Applied LinguisticsClassroom management is a term used byteachers to describe the process of ensuring thatclassroom lessons run smoothly despitedisruptive behavior by students..
  • What is‘classroom management’?DisciplineSeatingTiming / PacingAttending to student needsActivities organised wellBest use of resourcesGiving instructionsMonitoring / feedbackTeacher RolesDiscipline
  • What do the experts tell us aboutclassroom management?
  • Di Guilo (2007) claims that there are 3 stepsto a managed classroom:1) Preventative InterventionBefore the fact2) Supportive InterventionDuring the fact3) Corrective InterventionAfter the fact
  • Major (2008) has 8 rules of Classroom Management:1) Keep students busy2) Be Alert3) Be Engaging4) Be Consistent5) Get to know your students6) Don’t try to be your students’ best friend7) …or their worst enemy8) Praise good behaviourMajor M.R. (2008) The Teacher’s Survival Guide“Teaching is NOT a popularity contestTeaching is NOT a popularity contest”Marchesani (2007) The Field Guide to Teaching
  • What does David tell us aboutclassroom management?
  • Tip No. 1: Set Clear Rules!• Classroom Contractwww.superteachertools.com
  • Tip No. 2: Be consistent!Start as you mean to finishKnow your rules from Day 1Keep Them!Treat each ‘broken rule’ or unwantedbehaviour with the same consequence
  • Boring them to death is not an option!(however tempting it may seem!)
  • Tip No. 3: Provide Clear Instructions“Ok, everybody sit down. Now what you have to dois, when you, you take this sheet of paper that I’mhanding out now and keep it secret and some of youare “A”, it’s written at the top and some are labelled“B”. Ok, can you see that? Don’t show your paper toanyone and then you have to describe to yourpartner; sit face to face. Could you move your chairsaround and describe what’s on your paper so thatyour partner can find out what’s different and youmust agree; when you find something draw it onyour paper. Ok, do you understand?”
  • A B
  • A “I’d like you to peruse these questions and have a ponder,then make a stab at answering them.”B “Could you just move your chairs a bit and get yourselves ingroups?”C “Imagine if you were in this situation – how would you feel?Do you see what I mean? No? OK, you – in situation –feelings? what?”D “Let’s just run through the answers shall we?”E “Why don’t you just have a chat about this with yourneighbour?”Tip No. 3: Provide Clear Instructions
  • The worst thing a teacher can say ..Do you understand?
  • What is the purpose ofteachers ‘monitoring’student activity?Tip No. 4: Effective MonitoringHow does the monitoringvary depending on theactivity?
  • Advice taken from Jim Scrivener’s ‘Learning to Teach’Tip No. 4: Effective Monitoring1. Stand back to start with1. Stand back to start with2. Quickly go round and check1. Stand back to start with2. Quickly go round and check3. Don’t interrupt (unless..)1. Stand back to start with2. Quickly go round and check3. Don’t interrupt (unless..)4. Spread your attention1. Stand back to start with2. Quickly go round and check3. Don’t interrupt (unless..)4. Spread your attention5. Don’t correct (unless)1. Stand back to start with2. Quickly go round and check3. Don’t interrupt (unless..)4. Spread your attention5. Don’t correct (unless)6. Be easily accessible1. Stand back to start with2. Quickly go round and check3. Don’t interrupt (unless..)4. Spread your attention5. Don’t correct (unless)6. Be easily accessible7. If you need to, feed in ideas1. Stand back to start with2. Quickly go round and check3. Don’t interrupt (unless..)4. Spread your attention5. Don’t correct (unless)6. Be easily accessible7. If you need to, feed in ideas8. Give encouragement if necessary1. Stand back to start with2. Quickly go round and check3. Don’t interrupt (unless..)4. Spread your attention5. Don’t correct (unless)6. Be easily accessible7. If you need to, feed in ideas8. Give encouragement if necessary9. Take notes
  • Tip No. 5: Control the noise levelsWhat happenswhen you try towin an argumentwith a child byscreaming?So what shouldyou do?
  • Tip No. 5: Control the noise levelsDon’t try to talk OVER the noiseHave a consistent strategy- Fingers on lips- 3, 2, 1- Marble tin- Agreed noise level- Wait!- Scale of punishments- Lights
  • Tip No. 5: Control the noise levelsThe ‘No Game’ BarNO GAMENONOGAME !GAME !
  • You’ve got the power!Are they still acting up?Take it away!(if the problem lies with a thing)Differentiation(keep them busier with special /important tasks)Change seating(during the break)Don’t GetWalked On!
  • You’ve got the Power!!StudentAreaofcontrolOut ofcontrolTeacher
  • You’ve got the Power!!…but use itwisely!
  • Tip No. 6: You have the power of seatingRearrange seating whenever necessary:• Avoid power groups developing• Prevent talkative or disruptive students sitting together• To support mixed ability groups
  • Consider these possible seating arrangementsWhat activities would they be most suited for?Traditional Horseshoe Grouped (facing Teacher)Grouped(facing each other)Closed circles Open circleTip No. 6: You have the power of seating
  • What activities would they be most suited for?Traditional Horseshoe Grouped(facing Teacher)Grouped(facing each other)ClosedcirclesOpencirclesMingle / class surveys Topic discussionlecture Be easiest to change pairsPair work Maximum student productionTeams performing task Class with discipline problemsTest Your typical lesson
  • Think about your own position in the room Stand or sit? Static or moving? Front of room or somewhere else?Does itmatter?
  • Public Praisewww.rewardchartsforchildren.comPoints systemsindividual or teamPublic Praisewww.rewardchartsforchildren.comPublic Praisewww.rewardchartsforchildren.comTip No. 7: Positive Reinforcement
  • TaskYou will be given several example situations.In your groups, talk about the following:• What is the problem?• Why has it arisen?• How will you deal with it now?• What will you do to prevent it arising in the future?
  • a) A student hits another student because of angerb) You often find the lesson ends while you are mid-taskc) A student never completes homework assignmentsd) You often find yourself trying to lower the noise level within the classroome) The entire class performed poorly on their previous testf) One student seems not to want to work with any of the other studentsg) One student always copies from his friend who sits next to himh) A student enjoys playing the role of class clown, frequently disruptinglessons• What is the problem?• Why has it arisen?• How will you deal with it now?• What will you do to prevent it arising in the future?
  • Thank you for listening !AnyQuestions?