How to Succeed in the West: Stats, Best Practices and Common Mistakes for F2P Core Games (Kongregate F2P Monetization Presentation, Game Solutions Centre Singapore)
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How to Succeed in the West: Stats, Best Practices and Common Mistakes for F2P Core Games (Kongregate F2P Monetization Presentation, Game Solutions Centre Singapore)

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As a platform for free-to-play browser games for core gamers, Kongregate has a unique perspective and a wealth of data on what types of mechanics and characteristics of F2P games are most effective at ...

As a platform for free-to-play browser games for core gamers, Kongregate has a unique perspective and a wealth of data on what types of mechanics and characteristics of F2P games are most effective at maximizing player retention, monetization and satisfaction. David will begin by looking at the retention and monetization metrics of free-to-play games by Asian & Western developers. He will then share the best practices and game mechanics that Asian developers can learn from their Western counterparts, highlight common mistakes that Asian developers make in bringing their games to a Western audience, and cover specific DO’s and DON’Ts regarding game themes, gameplay mechanics, community management/customer support and pricing with specific examples. Asian developers will walk away with a better understanding of the Western market, how to avoid costly mistakes and how to maximize success in Western markets.

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  • As a platform for free-to-play browser games for core gamers and mobile F2P publisher, Kongregate has a unique perspective and a wealth of data on what types of mechanics and characteristics of F2P games are most effective at maximizing player retention, monetization and satisfaction. <br /> We have developers from all over the world distribute their games on Kongregate.com, including many Asian developers. <br /> In this talk, I will share practices, highlight common mistakes that Asian developers make in bringing their games to a Western audience, and cover specific DO’s and DON’Ts regarding game themes, gameplay mechanics, community management/customer support and pricing with specific examples. <br /> You will walk away with a better understanding how to avoid costly mistakes and how to maximize success in Western markets.
  • Hardcore gamers <br /> Driven by achievements (1M+ badges/wk) <br /> 96%+ of users already have Unity installed
  • Some of Kongregate mobile games <br /> Millions of downloads – promotion through Kongregate and GameStop channels, Apple/Google features <br /> Tiny Dice Dungeon is by a Springloaded, a local indie developer based here in Singapore
  • Here are some of the browser developers that we work with. We work with developers of all shapes and sizes from indies to big multinational companies. Most of the developers we work with are actually small independent developers.
  • The statistics that most F2P developers look at DAU, $/DAU, D1, D7 and D30 retention. <br /> 30-day retention is usually used to measure to “long term” retention in the F2P industry. <br /> While it is a good stat, 30 days is not “long term”, it is just a start.
  • So let’s take a look at some of that data. Before I dive in I want to give a few definitions so that it’s clear what I’m talking about. <br /> <br /> Very important how you define a user as they can change ARPU dramatically <br /> <br /> We believe the # of play sessions does a better job of capturing the intensity of gameplay. For instance, with 30-day retention, a player that plays the game twice in 30 days and another player that plays the game 100 times in 30 days are not differentiated. <br />
  • ARPU and ARPPUs for F2P games on Kongregate. <br /> X-axis is ARPPU, Y-axis is ARPU, size of bubble represents gross revenues <br /> <br /> ARPPUs for single-player games cluster around $5-$10 <br /> Multiplayer games range $20-$450+ <br />
  • We all tend to obsess over games/companies showing exponential growth but more often that not that’s followed by a crash. Linear may be less sexy and headline-catching, but the tortoise generally does win out. <br /> <br /> Top games still making as much or more as at launch as they hit 2- and 3-year anniversaries on Kong. <br /> <br />
  • I also wanted to provide a quick summary for my presentation from last year’s Casual Connect Asia
  • ARPU on Y-axis <br /> ARPPU on X-axis <br /> Each bubble represents a game and the size of the bubble represents revenue <br /> Cluster at bottom left is single player games <br /> Green bubbles are games by Western developers <br /> Brown are games by Asian devs <br /> Purple are mixed (Western developer based in Asia or vice-versa) <br /> <br /> Average ARPPU for a multiplayer game from Asia: $181 <br /> Average for Western multiplayer game: $51 <br /> Only 9 Western games have an ARPPU above $100 <br /> ARPPU is the main factor in high ARPU for Asian games, important factor for all games <br />
  • Asian games tend to have lower % buyers <br /> Western game tend to have higher conversion rates <br /> <br /> Data is a few month older than the data used in the previous graphs so #s are smaller for some games (e.g. game at $350 ARPPU in this graph is at $450 ARPPU in previous graph because users had more time to spend in the game) <br />
  • Asian games also tend to have lower initial retention as you can see here <br /> Western games tend to have higher initial retention <br /> <br /> Data is a few month older than the data used in the previous graphs so #s are smaller for some games (e.g. game at $350 ARPPU in this graph is at $450 ARPPU in previous graph because users had more time to spend in the game) <br />
  • And consequently also less players making it deep into the game since Asian games lose more players in the early game <br /> <br /> Data is a few month older than the data used in the previous graphs so #s are smaller for some games (e.g. game at $350 ARPPU in this graph is at $450 ARPPU in previous graph because users had more time to spend in the game) <br /> <br />
  • Let’s put the data in chart form <br /> You can see a strong correlation between long term retention and monetization- a player can only spend if they are still in the game! <br /> The more they plan, the more they are likely to buy, buy multiple times, spend more per transaction and overall. <br /> <br /> Revenue is dramatically weighted towards those who play a game very, very deeply – more than 80% of revenue comes from the 2% of players with more than 100 lifetime sessions <br /> <br /> Asian multiplayer games lose more players in the early part of the funnel, but more than make up for it by getting extremely deep investments from their most dedicated players. <br /> <br />
  • <br /> What are possible factors for the differences? <br /> What can Asian developers do to improve player retention and % buyers? <br /> <br /> Some common mistakes by Asian developers may account for some lower retention and % buyers <br />
  • Puzzle & Dragons (5/8 – 5/15) <br /> #1 Top Grossing Game in Japan <br /> Top ~90-150 Grossing Game in US <br /> P&D’s US ranking is still great but not as good relative to success in Japan <br />
  • Western gamers may also have trouble remembering Chinese names for characters and locations. This can make it harder harder to follow the game story or even play the game if the player can’t distinguish between different Chinese names
  • Autumn Dynasty Warlords is from a local Singaporean developer (Touch Dimensions)
  • Autho-pathing is a common mechanic in Chinese MMOs in which clicking on a quest automatically makes your character move to the desired location to complete the quest <br /> Auto-combat in these games basically start the battle and has the computer AI complete the battle with no input whatsoever from the player <br /> Player comments complaining about how these games play themselves, are all the game and are not interactive (with lots of upvotes!)
  • Ex. Chinese MMO (Tales of Solaris) which featured auto- and manual combat. <br /> But they set the default mode to auto combat <br /> Some players didn’t even know there was a manual combat mode (which made the game actually more fun and interactive, like a console turn-based Japanese RPG) <br /> We asked the developer to set the default mode to manual combat instead of auto <br /> This led to higher player rating and initial retention
  • Example of Wargaming removing all P2W monetization mechanics in World of Tanks and only selling cosmetic items. It may or may not work for them. But monetizing off just cosmetic items is very hard unless you have a a big volume of users and a high res 3D game in which the players can see the difference in appearance and show it off to others.
  • Example from Dragons of Atlantis which had a top hard currency package of USD$400 <br /> Incredulous players bombarded the game’s Comments Section <br /> <br /> Hiding the big packages led to players not complaining about it anymore <br /> <br /> Don’t scare away potential players or buyers <br /> The more you play a game, the more likely you are to buy and the less price sensitive you become. In other words, as you become more invested in the game, time-wise and emotionally, the more likely you are to become also financially invested in the game.
  • CCG game with VIP system <br /> Earn VIP points by buying Gold (hard currency) <br /> VIP points unlock VIP levels with increasing VIP bonuses (gamifying purchasing like airlines/hotels) <br /> At launch, the developer stated outright that 200k gold is needed to unlock VIP10 (highest level) <br /> Players quickly calculated that it would cost USD$4,000 to unlock VIP <br /> Players flooded game’s Comments Section pointed this
  • We asked the developer to remove the text about 200k Gold needed for VIP10 and player anguish subsided <br />
  • Asians developers usually just say that the issue has been fixed and never really apologize for issues or use canned responses that do not come across as sincere: <br /> “We are sorry for the inconvenience. Thank you for your patience and keep playing the game!”
  • This is Wartune, a big hit in China by Seventh Road that has been brought to the west by R2 games. <br /> It has so many currencies, bars, buttons, etc that it’s almost hard to see the screen of an advanced player, though they do a good job of introducing them gradually. <br /> There’s synchronous solo & team PvP, solo & team PvE, asynchronous plundering, guild battles, farming, town building, weapon synthesizing & upgrading, astral collecting & combining, and I’ve definitely forgotten something. <br /> It is important to pace the introduction of new features/gameplay modes to not overwhelm players with a long and intimidating tutorial.
  • RPG is defined a bit loosely here, and really means that you’re building up your account over time, leveling up, adding skills, etc.
  • The very top games have both synchronous and asynchronous multiplayer because more things to do is better, but asynchronous generally the focus. Aysnchronous allows players to play and interact at their pace and convenience which leads to deeper engagement.
  • Now let’s look at best practices and examples to optimize monetization
  • Shopping should be easy AND frictionless <br /> Example in which user could not find the shop because it was a hot air balloon floating above your town. You had to move your screen up there (and there is no reason to do that if you didn’t know there was a store up there). <br /> Make it easy for users to find the store <br /> Make it easy for them to shop and find what they are looking for (meaningful categories and descriptions, no massive scroll bars) <br /> Mix soft and hard currency items <br /> But don’t try to sell too hard, too fast. First few sessions should focus on fun and giving players reasons to come back and play and get hooked
  • Provide bonuses % or/and items provide incentives for buying larger hard currency packages <br /> Clearly call out bonuses of larger packages! Decrease friction, do the math for the player and make shopping easier. <br /> Make all packages visible in one page <br /> Hide $100+ packages until after first purchase. Prevents sticker shock and users getting turned off by seeing $250, $500+ packages early on <br />
  • Make sure players can spend $1k+ if they want to
  • We’ve got chat next to every game, and forums just below, and we think it’s a big contributor to games reporting significantly higher ARPUs (generally 2-3x ARPU over FB and other platforms, sometimes 5-10x) on Kongregate than on Facebook.
  • Revenue is generally 20x higher for guild members than non-guild members, though generally true of late-stage players it’s a bit hard to tease out causation. However the addition of guilds, especially competitive guilds, is often an inflection point for revenue for games. <br /> Upbends dynamics of pay-to-win – symbiotic relationship between time-rich and money-rich users
  • While this may seem obvious, keeping your players engaged and happy is crucial to your bottom line. Where it gets less obvious is frequency. Adding 6 major features once every year is completely different than one major new feature every 2 months in the eyes of a player. You can also use things like events and special deals to stagger dev-heavy content and features while still keeping an active community.
  • Here is another view of Fantasy Online, this time graphing weekly revenue. The spikes occur due to increased interest from players and promotions run by Kongregate, but then the low end after each spike gets higher. Players react well to a game that feels like it is alive and growing, and are more willing to invest in it when they feel that their investment will retain value in the long run, or perhaps even gain in value as the game develops.
  • By contrast, here is an Asian MMO that started off doing extremely well – far better than Fantasy Online (so far!). They were featured early and built a big audience, but then not much happened with the game. The only major update was launched over a year after the game released on Kongregate, and while it built up a relative spike of interest briefly, the momentum was lost and the game, while still profitable, hasn’t been able to regain its earlier glory days. Meanwhile, Fantasy Online has grown and now outperforms this other game by a fair margin.
  • Taken to an extreme, here is Dream World, which is a mostly text-based MMORPG that developed a bit of a (large) cult following on Kongregate. Initially the game did well, though was not outstanding and definitely was below the aforementioned Asian MMO. A single expansion was launched after a few months, and then not much until 9 months after release. At that point, content updates become much more frequent, with new features, promotions, and events appearing on a monthly basis. Large spikes followed by higher valleys grew revenue tremendously. The only real downturn was late 2011 when the Playmage team focused their efforts on their new game (Time World) and didn’t update Dream World significantly. As predicted, sales trailed off a bit, until after Time World launched. Just recently Dream World launched a New Server with a special event and the revenue appears to be heading back upward.
  • The common mistakes highlighted in this presentation are factors that contribute to lower retention and % buyers for F2P games from Asian developers <br /> The mistakes introduce friction to the user experience. Friction causes you to lose players which will decrease your retention. <br /> Reduce long term retention leads to reduced monetization.
  • This is about how you think about your business.

How to Succeed in the West: Stats, Best Practices and Common Mistakes for F2P Core Games (Kongregate F2P Monetization Presentation, Game Solutions Centre Singapore) How to Succeed in the West: Stats, Best Practices and Common Mistakes for F2P Core Games (Kongregate F2P Monetization Presentation, Game Solutions Centre Singapore) Presentation Transcript

  • How to Succeed in the West: Stats, Best Practices and Common Mistakes for F2P Core Games David P Chiu Senior Director of Developer Relations & Business Development Kongregate, A GameStop Company
  • What is Kongregate? • Open platform for browser-based games – Flash, Unity, HTML5, Java, etc. – 96%+ of users already have Unity installed • 21M+ monthly unique visitors worldwide • Core gamers – 85% male, average age of 22 • MMOs, RPGs, CCGs/TCGs, TD, shooters, etc. • Platform level virtual currency “Kreds” for F2P games • Acquired by GameStop July 2010
  • Kongregate is also a mobile publisher of F2P games
  • Some of Kongregate’s Existing Developer Partners
  • Stats both reflect & shape mind-set So what statistics does F2P focus on? Daily Active Users, DAU $/DAU 1- & 7-Day Retention To a lesser extent MAU & 30-Day 30-Day Retention is a good stat, but 30 days is not “long-term” retention, it’s the start.
  • A little background • All stats are lifetime, min 6 weeks on platform • ARPU: average revenue per user • ARPPU: average revenue per paying user • Player: a Kongregate registered user who loaded the game page at least once • Plays = Sessions: our preferred method to measure retention
  • $0.00 $1.00 $2.00 $3.00 $4.00 $5.00 $6.00 $7.00 $8.00 $9.00 $10.00 $0 $50 $100 $150 $200 $250 $300 $350 $400 $450 $500 ARPU(USD$) ARPPU (USD$) ARPU & ARPPU
  • Linear Growth x Many Years = Awesome Business
  • Asian F2P vs Western F2P Stats
  • ARPU and ARPPU
  • ARPU and % Buyers
  • ARPU and % Repeats
  • ARPU and % 50+ gameplays
  • Asian vs Western Style • Asian games: High ARPPU, tight player funnel – Monetization caters well to big spenders • Western games: Lower ARPPU, wide player funnel – Monetization focuses more on initial retention and broad conversion to paid at lower prices • Some common mistakes by Asian developers when bringing their games to the West can contribute to the lower retention and conversion rates • What are common pitfalls to avoid and best practices to adopt?
  • What works in Asia doesn’t necessarily work in the West
  • • Puzzle & Dragons (5/8 – 5/15) – #1 Top Grossing Game in Japan – Top ~90-150 Grossing Game in US • P&D’s US ranking is still great but not as good relative to success in Japan What’s popular in Asia isn’t always popular in the West
  • • MT Card Battle from LocoJoy – Huge success in China – But much less successful in the US Can’t expect a game to be successful in the West just because it was successful in Asia What’s popular in Asia isn’t always popular in the West
  • What’s popular in Asia isn’t always popular in the West • Many successful games in Asia based on Romance of the Three Kingdoms and Journey to the West • But Westerners are not familiar with these classical Chinese novels and themes • Less likely to play Asian-themed game (compared to a medieval themed game) • Also have trouble remembering Chinese names for characters and locations • Hard to follow the game story or even play the game
  • Example: Autumn Dynasty Warlords • RTS game set in ancient China • Great game but theme only appeals to a niche audience in the West DO consider how universal the game theme is and if it will appeal to Westerners
  • Auto-pathing and Auto-Combat • The last 2 years have seen a flood of auto-pathing/auto-combat games from Asia • Very popular game mechanics in Chinese MMOs • Convenient feature that speeds up the game • Reduces fatigue from grinding • But unpopular with Western gamers • Like interactivity, control and choice • Want to play a game, not watch a game play itself • Feel all auto-pathing/auto-combat games are the same
  • Auto-pathing and Auto-Combat • If a game has both manual and auto-combat options: DO show player both options and give ability to set the default (or default to manual combat) DON’T set the default to auto-combat
  • Attitudes Towards Free-to-Play and Pay-to-Win
  • Free-to-Play and Pay-to-win • Free-to-play games have become a dominant model worldwide • Asian developers and players are used to paying for power • But some Western developers and gamers still don’t like it • Some Western players avoid games they feel are “pay-to-win” or in which (big) spenders have too big of an advantage over free players – So avoid appearing outright as a pay-to-win game
  • Free-to-Play and Pay-to-win • Soften the perception of pay-to-win and avoid sticker shock: DO hide USD$100+ packages until after first purchase DON’T scare away potential players/buyers with high prices (Ex. “$400 packages?!?!”)
  • Sticker Stock: Extreme Edition • Chinese CCG game with VIP system • Earn VIP points by buying Gold (hard currency) • VIP points unlock VIP levels with increasing VIP bonuses • At launch, the developer stated outright that 200k gold is needed to unlock VIP10 • Players quickly calculated that it would cost USD$4,000 to unlock VIP10 • Players flooded game’s Comments Section • Even those that liked the game complained
  • Free-to-Play vs Pay-to-win • Developer removed 200k Gold for VIP10 text at Kongregate’s request • And no new complaints about the USD $4,000 cost of VIP10 DO be careful with messaging and placement of big ticket items in the shop DON’T come across as the extremely greedy, money-grubbing developer
  • Customer Service Expectations
  • “The Customer is Always Right” • Western customer culture is very different compared to Asia – Consumers feel more entitled, have higher expectations of customer service – Also more empowered (ability to get refunds, issue chargebacks, organize boycotts) • Need good community management and customer service teams to keep players satisfied
  • Community Management and Customer Service • The more time you invest playing a game, the more emotionally attached you become • Emotional investment can potentially lead to financial investment as well • Player less likely to spend in with inactive developer  Will the game get updated? Will bugs get fixed? Does the developer even care? • Creating positive community and showing good customer service  Players are more confident that their investment of time and money will not be wasted • Show the players that you are care about them (and not just making money) • Be visible – engage in chat, forums, etc • Be responsive – reply to common complaints/bugs/questions, purchase issues, etc. • Be informative – give advance notice for maintenance and changes
  • Communicating during a crisis Sometimes bad things happen (game does down, major bugs appear) and players will be upset • Effective crisis management can help calm the storm a little • Be open, transparent and honest • Post in the game forum to apologize and assure players that you are aware of the problem and are working on it • Don’t be silent! Players will think that you don’t care about them or the game. • Provide updates regularly even when you have nothing new to report (better than nothing) “We are still working to get the game back up ASAP. Sorry but please bear with us” • If you are unsure about when the issue can be fixed, avoid giving specific timelines • Don’t forget to express regret and acknowledge players’ frustration •  “We know that this sucks as those in the middle of a Clan War will lose valuable time and gold from the downtime. We are sorry and we are working as fast as we can.”
  • After the crisis: Customer service is a chance to surprise and delight • Handle things quickly • Be generous with compensation • Poor compensation can make things worse • But don’t do something unless you’re willing to do it for everybody • Don’t forget to express regret – an apology goes a long way • Canned messages or short replies can come across cold or corporate • E.g. “It was fixed. You can play now.”  No sympathy • Example of poor compensation making players angrier:
  • Miscellaneous Best Practices
  • Timing is everything! • Specify time zones or set a server time and have it be visible so there is no confusion leading players to miss events/sales • Bar on top of Wartune’s loading screen clearly lists the server time, the next event’s start time and a countdown to it • If all players are in the same server (not split into US vs EU servers), then have at least 2 instances of an event so players in different time zones can join • Daylight Saving Time – be aware of when changes occur and make adjustments as needed so you don’t start events 1 hour early or late
  • Timing is everything! • Do not schedule maintenance if no one is around afterwards to make sure everything went well E.g. Chinese MMO dev does maintenance 5-7pm China time but everyone leaves work before maintenance is done • Maintenance fails and game is down for 12+ hrs • Big drop in daily revenue • Players unhappy with extremely long maintenance and lack of response from developer
  • You only get one chance to make a first impressions • Don't flood with fake reviews and comments as players are smart enough to know • Don't use art assets and sound effects/music from popular games  Players will notice and rate down your game • Make sure that your game has a good translator
  • Keep players busy! More things to do = more players staying • Solo and team PvE • Solo and team PvP • Asynch raids • Guild battles • World boss raids • Farming • Town Building • Weapon/Gear Synthesizing & Upgrading • Astral Collecting and Combining • Etc. It is important to pace the introduction of new features/gameplay modes to not overwhelm players with a long and intimidating tutorial.
  • Without progress you have nothing • The foundations of a F2P game are a strong RPG elements and a sense of progress over time • Building up account, leveling up, adding/improves skills and stats, etc • Surprisingly it’s more important than multiplayer Type % 50+ Plays % Buyers ARPPU ARPU Multiplayer RPG 2.6% 0.75% $69 $0.51 Multiplayer Non-RPG 1.0% 0.45% $9 $0.05 Single-player RPG 1.8% 1.29% $12 $0.10 Single-Player Non-RPG 0.2% 0.53% $4 $0.02 Deep RPG mechanics and multiplayer matter: • 25x ARPU for Multiplayer RPG vs Single Player non-RPG!
  • Asynchronous > Synchronous Type % 50 Plays % Buyers ARPPU ARPU Synchronous 1.4% 0.54% $43 $0.25 Asynchronous 3.6% 0.80% $88 $0.66 Both 2.9% 1.07% $51 $0.55 Single-Player 0.8% 0.85% $7 $0.05 • Multiplayer keeps players engaged and busy in the long run • But not all types of multiplayer are created equal • Top games have both synchronous and asynchronous multiplayer (more is better) • Asynchronous is better than synchronous because it allows players to play at their own pace and convenience
  • Best Practices for Optimizing Monetization: A happy customer is a paying customer
  • Shopping should be easy and frictionless • Location, location, location – make the store easy to find! • Make it easy to find the right item – Meaningful categories and item descriptions – No massive scroll bars • Mix soft currency and hard currency items • BUT – don’t try to sell too hard, too fast. First few sessions should focus on fun & giving players reasons to come back to play and get hooked.
  • Buy Screen • Bonuses % or/and items provide incentives for buying larger hard currency packages • Clearly call out bonuses of larger packages! • Make all packages visible in one page • Hide $100+ packages until after first purchase
  • Making the shopping experience interesting • First time buyer/ Starter packages • Seed players with some paid/hard currency and guide “intro purchase” • Deals/events to get people into the habit of spending regularly • Offer items that enhance the gameplay experience (not just speedups) • Intro the right items at the right time – Lvl 1 players should not be shown the lvl 100+ holy sword that’s on sale for $100) • Keep them coming back – keep store fresh by adding new items, unlocking items as players level up and featuring seasonal and time-limited items
  • Make sure players can spend as much as they want • The longer someone plays your game the more likely they are to buy and the less price sensitive they become • Give committed players the ability to spend at $1,000+ if they want • Have lots of items that are appealing and useful to a committed player and price them higher (if possible) than items meant for early/mid-game play. [Higher means $30-100, not $1000] • If you make a fun game, someone may want to spend an infinite amount. • Don’t create a situation where spending is capped by availability or utility. • Again, remember to make it easy for players to buy!
  • Make it easy for community to build Chat, forums, player-to-player messages are all great Real relationships build when people interact. The more ways they can do it, the better.
  • Guilds are awesome • 100% of our top games have guilds • Guild members spend 10-20x more than non-guild members • Strong correlation as guilds improve retention and monetization with late stage players Some reasons they make a difference • Social incentives to return  I want to see my friends • Social pressures to return  I don’t want to disappoint them • Improves the psychology of purchases  I’m doing it for the team, not me • Upends the dynamics of pay-to-win  can set up a symbiotic relationship between buyers and non-buyers where both add value to the same group
  • The Value of Developer Activity Keep feeding your players • Regular updates, new features, and events yield greater engagement and reduced fatigue. • Sales and specials can offer significant jumps in revenue.
  • The Value of Developer Activity Hot New Games Badges added Custom User Items New zone, XL, etc. Equips, Guild bonuses Halloween, sale Christmas event Guild wars FantasyOnlineRevenue
  • The Value of Developer Activity Front Page Badges Item promotion New Version Revenue Fantasy Online Asian MMO
  • The Value of Developer Activity Front page Badges added Expansion Labor day event Expansion Christmas update Expansion Easter event Expansion Expansion New Server Revenue Fantasy Online Dream World Asian MMO
  • Remember: Commitment Matters Type of Player % Buyers Avg Trx ARPPU ARPU % Players % of Rev Non-Repeats 0.03% 2.1 $24.69 $0.01 43% 0% Repeats (2-9 plays) 0.40% 1.85 $19.61 $0.08 40% 3% Regs (10-49 plays) 4.68% 2.61 $21.35 $1.00 10% 12% Committed (50+ plays) 16.53% 7.03 $96.92 $16.02 7% 84% DO apply these learnings and best practices into your own game DON’T make the mistakes other Asian F2P developers have made in Western markets
  • THANK YOU For a copy of the presentation or questions, email davidchiu@gamestop.com For more talks & data visit developers.kongregate.com For web games contact us at apps@kongregate.com If you’re interested in mobile publishing it’s davidchiu@gamestop.com Follow us on Twitter: @EmilyG & @KongregateDevs