Business Models and Capability Driven Roadmaps
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Business Models and Capability Driven Roadmaps

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The challenge facing Enterprise Architecture. The impact of digital disruption means the shelf life of business models is getting shorter. Enterprise architecture must learn the skills to move......

The challenge facing Enterprise Architecture. The impact of digital disruption means the shelf life of business models is getting shorter. Enterprise architecture must learn the skills to move away from the operating model layer and elevate architecture to the level of business model design.

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  • 1. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 31 - Business Model Design - The Capability Driven Roadmap PRESENTEDTOBOC’SEAINFODAY APRIL10TH 2014 David O’Hara Principal Consultant , Enterprise Architects
  • 2. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 32 - About Enterprise Architects - Designing the Business Model: Responding to the challenge of Disruption - Creating a Capability-Driven Roadmap - EA Case Study & Tool Demo
  • 3. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 33 Introduction › 20 years in Business-facing roles in the IT industry, mostly private sector » Telco, Retail, FS… › Principal Business Architect (EMEA) at Enterprise Architects » Architecture practitioner & trainer › Specialising in Business Architecture over 9+years » Business Engagement » Business Motivation » Capability Driven Planning » Enterprise Roadmaps » Building EA Practices @DaveO_EA @enterprisearchs David O’Hara › Enterprise / Business Architect #EAID2014
  • 4. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 34 Enterprise Architects
  • 5. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 35 About Enterprise Architects › Enterprise Architects (EA) is an international professional services firm providing strategy & architecture services. › Our vision is to be the most respected specialist architecture organisation globally, setting new standards for effectiveness in strategy execution. › Our core value proposition is to help clients unlock the value of their investments using the principles of architecture. › We believe that architecture is important and, when done well, will profoundly improve corporate performance.
  • 6. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 36 Our Services Enterprise Architects is a dedicated team of architecture specialists • Exclusive Chief Architect/CTO Round Tables • Virtual Teaming & Practitioner Collaboration • Industry Groups & Focus Events • Practitioner Communities • Career Support & Advice • ‘Lifetime Relationship’ Commitment • Contract, Perm & Interim Recruitment • Interim Leadership • Executive & Retained Search & Selection • Candidate Assessments by Qualified Architects • Contract Staff Backed by I/P • Supplied Staff Trained to TOGAF® 9 • HR Career Management • Flexible Workforce Planning and Delivery • TOGAF® Certification • ArchiMate® • Advanced & Applied EA • Business Architecture • Information Management & Governance • EA Kickstart (Combined Consulting, Training & Mentoring) • Customised Private Training – Solving Topical Issues • IT Strategy Delivery • Blueprint & Roadmap Development • Consulting, Advisory & Mentoring Services • Enterprise, Business, Technical & Solution Architecture • Practice Capability Development • Maturity Assessments • Governance Risk & Compliance • Framework & Tool Selection and Support • Repository Management Training & Development Talent Services Knowledge Community Consulting Services
  • 7. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 37 www enterprisearchitects.com youtube.com/user/EntArchitectsEA @enterprisearchs facebook.com/enterprisearchitects enterprise-architects …join the discussion!
  • 8. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 38 Responding to the challenge of Disruption Designing the Business Model
  • 9. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 39 Overview › Change is the only constant…..…..so what else is new? › In the Digital economy, both the PACE of change and IMPACT of change are increasing: market disruption, driven by digital innovation, is occurring more frequently and with greater effect » New players, differentiated offerings, new Business Models…. › For CIOs and Chief Architects, working at the Operating Model layer is not sufficient to respond to these external challenges › Architecture needs to evolve: from Operating Model design to Business Model design The challenge facing Enterprise Architecture: to re-design Business Models
  • 10. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 310 ‘Enterprise Lifecycle's 2014 © Enterprise Architects PTY LTD PERORMANCE TIME ENTERPRISE BRAND PLATFORM BUSINESS MODEL BUSINESS COMPETENCIES PRODUCT Change is moving faster…and the Business Model shelf-life is shrinking Who is best placed to respond to this challenge? …so Business Models become ‘stale’ and must be renewed As what was once innovative becomes commoditised, value discipline orientation changes…
  • 11. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 311 Enterprises must learn how to design and execute Business Models › Architects deeply understand both Business Capability AND Technology… › ….and how they can be remodelled around changes in business strategy Enterprise Architecture Who is best placed to understand and respond to this challenge?
  • 12. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 312 ANALYTICAL THINKING INTUITIVE THINKING * From Roger Martin (2009) The Design of Business GOAL: Reliably produce consistent, predictable outcomes GOAL: Produce outcomes that meet desired objectives Architecture requires a balance of thinking styles The challenge is identifying the right skills in the organisation that are able to traverse the domains of innovative, intuitive thinking and reliable, analytical thinking. NPV EVA Operation Management Quality Management Corporate Governance Enterprise Patterns Portfolio Analysis IT Governance Value Engineering PRINCE2 Six Sigma & Lean Business Intelligence Strategic Traceability Financial Modelling Innovation Management Business Analysis Data visualisation Talent Management System Thinking Mission Business Model Design Stakeholder Value TOGAF Cost Engineering Solution Architecture Knowledge Ecosystem Six Thinking Hats Collective Intelligence Gamification Crowdsourcing Change Management Perception Management Wicked Problems Environmental Scanning Brand Management Integrative Thinking Goals Capability Five Forces Root Cause Analysis Product Management Search for “The EA Headspace” Business Architecture Our Focus Areas
  • 13. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 313 Vision & Mission Design Thinking Business Outcomes Value Systems Innovation Systems Thinking Coherence Business Model Prototyping Capabilities Visualisation
  • 14. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 314 What is a Business Model? Some Definitions › “A Business Model is a set of activities which a company performs, how it performs them, and when it performs them, so as to offer its customers value whilst making a profit” › Business Models – A Strategic Management Approach › “A Business Model describes the rationale of how an organization creates, delivers, and captures value” › Alex Osterwalder – Business Model Generation › “A Business Model is a framework for creating value in a coherent manner” Craig Martin, Chief Architect @ EA Value The Environment The Business Model Market Model Products and Service Model Operating Model  Markets  Industries  Customers  Market Segment  Channels  Customer Relationships  Value Proposition  Offering: Products / Services  Capabilities  Processes / Value Chains  Business Services  Functions  Data  Applications  Technology
  • 15. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 315 The goal of a good Business Model is to create coherence Building coherence requires an understanding of the components of a Business Model, and how to assemble them in a manner that is innovative and differentiating whilst maintaining stability. › A Coherent Business Model is one that is synchronised around: » its market position, » its product and service portfolio; and » its most distinctive strategic capabilities › All of the above working together as a system The Environment The Business Model Market Model Products and Service Model Operating Model  Markets  Industries  Customers  Market Segment  Channels  Customer Relationships  Value Proposition  Offering: Products / Services  Capabilities  Processes / Value Chains  Business Services  Functions  Data  Applications  Technology
  • 16. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 316 Capability Driven › Capability driven architectures are designed to support the strategic objectives of an organisation › Capabilities consist of people, process and technology › To fully understand a capability all these components must exist regardless of their maturity level One of the ways we create coherence is through capability based planning Capability based planning is one of the tools that looks at the best “mix” of resources required to develop this coherence Mission Strategies Tactics Vision Goals Objectives Outcome CAPABILITY People Process Technology
  • 17. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 317 Typical architecture practice maturity EA = IT Architecture Improve project performance EA = Enterprise-Wide IT Architecture (EWITA) Improve IT performance EA = Business Architecture (BA) + EWITA Improve Business Performance EA = Strategic Enabler + BA + EWITA Improve Market Performance (Shareholder Value) Value Mandate EA = Product Architecture + Business Architecture (BA) + EWITA Improve Product/Service Performance E A B C D The majority of organisations today sit approximately here on this curve *Adapted from Ruth Malan, Dana Bredemeyer Business Architecture is seen as a positive progression away from IT
  • 18. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 318 What is Business Architecture? › We like to refer to it as “the Design of Business” › It is about giving strategic business objectives greater clarity and structure by describing how they translate into operations. › The goal of Business Architecture is to operationalise business strategy, thereby helping business leaders avoid a risky leap directly from strategy to specific project investments.
  • 19. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 319 Positioning Business Architecture Business Architecture must connect strategy to business and IT change Business Architecture Strategy Implementation
  • 20. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 320 EnterpriseArchitecture Outcomes Business Architecture is an integral part of the Enterprise Architecture Business Information Applications Technology SERVICES › Business Architecture provides the crucial business context for the ‘technical’ layers, aligning architecture ‘services’ to provide coherent business outcomes
  • 21. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 321 The contribution of Business Architecture relates to the mandate…. EA = IT Architecture Improve project performance EA = Enterprise-Wide IT Architecture (EWITA) Improve IT performance Value Mandate A B Application Architecture Application and Integration Architecture Technology Architecture The Capability Anchor Model Roadmaps and Migration Planning Mandate = IT OPTIMISATION
  • 22. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 322 …and views and viewpoints will be different…. Value Mandate The Capability Anchor Model Mandate = BUSINESS OPTIMISATION EA = Business Architecture (BA) + EWITA Improve Business PerformanceC Org. Structure Required to Fulfil P R O G R A M M E C O M M I T T E E P R O V I S I O N I N G Project Resources (Technical) Project Resources (Functional) Specialists Project A Project B Project C SHARED AND ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES National Accounts Small Business (value segment) Small Business (cost segment) Individual Consumer CEO Mkg. Dist. CEO SalesMkg. Product Design COO . Mana ge Custo mer Relati ons Manage and deliver content ITDesign and Developmen tBusiness Unit - serving Corporate A Business Unit – serving end users Business Unit - serving content providers Marketing for Tomorrow’s: Marketing for Today’s: Marketing Matrix Project Market Segmentation Virtual Time Based Reconfigurable Company structures around market segment Focus on core and outsource the rest Dual organisations one unit focusing on tomorrow, one on today Dual reporting lines with shared services servicing all business units Project teams are created based on shifting strategies. Permanent functional structure exists. Specialists and functional staff combine to form project teams Strategic & Project Investment Priorities and Focus Areas Plan & Market Information, Knowledge & Systems People Assets & Services • Strategically critical • HIGH coverage by in-flightinitiatives • NOT strategically critical • HIGH coverage by in-flightinitiatives • Strategically critical • LOW coverage by in-flightinitiatives • NOT strategically critical • LOW coverage by in-flightinitiatives HIGH COVERAGE LOW COVERAGE Initiative Coverage (primary impact on L1 and L2 activities only) Ref Capabilities # In-flight Initiatives % Gap C14 Sales Planning and Management 9 0% C15 Sales Execution 6 0% C30 Network Development 6 0% C3 Plan to Realise 5 11% C10 Channel Strategy Management 4 25% Ref Capabilities # In-flight Initiatives % Gap C17 Customer Service 9 0% C34 Track and Trace 4 0% C45 Information,Knowledge & Systems Delivery 2 14% C43 People Day-to Day Management 4 40% Ref Capabilities # In-flight Initiatives % Gap C1 Research,Analysis & Insights 4 50% C8 MarketPlanning 3 60% C13 Business Performance Management 4 75% C2 Corporate Vision & Strategy Management 2 100% C5 Acquisition and Divestment 2 100% C40 People Planning 4 100% C48 AssetLifecycle Management 3 100% Ref Capabilities # In-flight Initiatives % Gap C44 Finformation,Knowledge & Systems Planning 11 63% C45 Information & Knowledge Governance 11 67% C41 Recruit& Retain People 5 21% C4 Innovation Management 3 100% C51 Supplier Relationship Management 2 100% Strategically ImportantYES NO Cost/ Value/ Asset Apportionment across the business Realisation Tactics Software Automation Projects Funds investment Widget assembly Credit card approval Inventory Management Outsourcing Projects Major re- design projects Six-sigma based process improvement New Product design Deals with other companies International Delivery On-line purchasing ERP based process improvement Complex Processes, not part of company’s core competency: Outsource Complex, dynamic processes of high value: undertake business process improvement efforts that focus on people Straightforward, static commodity processes: use automated ERP-Type applications and / or outsource Straightforward, static, and valuable: automate to gain efficiency High High Low Low Must be done but adds little value to product or services Very important to success, high value added to products and services Strategic Importance ProcessComplexityandDynamics Complex negotiation, design, or decision process Many business rules; expertise involved Some business rules Procedure or simple algorithm Capability Maturity Overlay Process Maturity Assessment Key Points&Assumptions  The average process maturity across the enterprise is2.3  62%of activities have a process maturity of Adhoc or Repeatable  Process Areas Manage Information Knowledge &Systems and Pan have the lowest average process maturity–1.7and1.8respectively  95Level4activities(22%)have been classified with a Level1maturity(adhoc–minimal to no development of process and procedure) Methodology and Approach:  The Process Owners classified the process maturity of the level4activities within their designated process area.  Results were validated by practitioners out in the business  Activities were classified against the Carnegie Mellon Capability Maturity Model(CMM) The CCM split maturity five categories(see table below)ranging from Level1(adhoc)to Level5(best practice)  The average process maturity for each process area(plan,market,etc.…)is a linear average of the supporting level4activities.i.e.all processes have equal weightings. 1. PROCESS MATURITY FINDINGS Source:Process Maturity Assessment conducted by the Process Owners 62%of Posts processes are underdeveloped and potentially impacting business 1. PROCESS MATURITY FINDINGS Source:Process Maturity Assessment conducted by the Process Owners The lowest capability maturity exists in Information,Knowledge&Systems and Plan Process Maturity Classification Level 1 Adhoc Level 2 Repeatable Level 3 Defined Level 4 Managed Australia Post has minimal to no development of processes and procedures across the organization . Australia Post has established basic processes and procedures which are repeatable across the organization Australia Post has defined all processes and procedures which are standardized and integrated across the organization . Australia Post has defined key performance indicators which are used to manage and measure process and procedural performance . Level 5 Best Practices Australia Post has adopted leading practices and an approach for continual process improvement . Level1 Adhoc Level2 Repeatable Level3 Defined Level4 Managed Level5 Best Practice Total Average Process Maturity Plan Fulfil Info,Knowledge&Systems People Finance Assets& Services Market Customer Totals 24 28 5 5 0 62 1.85 18 22 52 14 0 106 2.85 24 22 7 0 0 53 1.68 6 38 11 2 1 58 2.21 2 5 13 17 12 49 3.65 5 25 5 5 1 41 2.32 12 8 4 7 0 31 2.19 4 24 2 3 0 33 2.12 95 172 99 53 14 433 2.35 22% 40% 23% 12% 3% 100% Maturity Assessment Summary 62%of activities are underdeveloped(not defined) 12% 23% 40% 22% 3% Level1– Adhoc,95, Level2– Repeatable,172, Level3– Defined,99, Level4– Managed,53, Level5–Best Practice,14,  The processes supporting the enterprise are on averagerepeatable– i.e. they are not standardised across the enterprise  Opportunities to improve efficiency exist through standardising and streamlining processes  Plan and Manage Information Knowledge and Systems have the highest room for improvement 0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 1.8 2.2 2.6 2.1 3.7 2.2 1.7 2.3 2.3 Plan Market Fulfil Interact with Customer Manage Finance Manage Information, Knowledge &Systems Manage People Manage Assets& Services Total Level1– Adhoc(1) Level2– Repeatable(2) Level3– Defined(3) Level4– Managed(4) Level5– Best Practice(5) High room for improvement Avg.Process Maturity Loss of coherence Across the Transformation Programs Opex vs.. Effort to Increase Efficiency
  • 23. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 323 …relative to the concerns of different stakeholders Value Mandate Mandate = STRATEGIC OPTIMISATION EA = Strategic Enabler + BA + EWITA Improve Market Performance (Shareholder Value) EA = Product Architecture + Business Architecture (BA) + EWITA Improve Product/Service Performance E D
  • 24. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 324 The Environment The Business Model Market Model Products and Service Model Operating Model  Markets  Industries  Customers  Market Segment  Channels  Customer Relationships  Value Proposition  Offering: Products / Services  Capabilities  Processes / Value Chains  Business Services  Functions  Data  Applications  Technology Our Findings: ownership gap For Business Architecture, lines of responsibility are often unclear Business Ownership Strategic Architecture Mandate – IT Ownership IT Architecture Mandate – Unresolved Business Architecture Mandate ?
  • 25. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 325 Views and Models Supporting the Mandate › Value Chain Analysis › Cross Functional Models › Capability/Business Anchor Models › Process Models › Application Models › Data and Information Models › Technology Models › Value Maps › Product and Offering Maps › Design Models › Customer Experience › Journey Maps › Learning Maps › Motivation Models › Business Model Innovation The Environment The Business Model Market Model Products and Service Model Operating Model  Markets  Industries  Customers  Market Segment  Channels  Customer Relationships  Value Proposition  Offering: Products / Services  Capabilities  Processes / Value Chains  Business Services  Functions  Data  Applications  Technology Mandate
  • 26. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 326 So how do we respond? › If the goal of EA is to create coherence not just at the Operating Model level but at the Business Model level, EA must: › Learn and apply new skills…start thinking like Business Designers! › Elevate the discussion with the business from the Operating Model level to the Business Model level » First and foremost, communicating in the language of the business » Embracing business strategy concepts › Engaging the Business and ‘prototyping’ new business models » Using the right tools for the job: the Business Motivation Model and the Business Model Canvass, not just the Capability Model Responding to the disruption challenge and ownership gap
  • 27. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 327 › To unlock the full potential of Architecture, the mandate needs to increase away from the Operating Model level Responding to Disruption means changing the mandate for Architecture Summary › The Business model lifecycle is shrinking! › Enterprise Architecture must equip the CIO to engage other ‘C’ level stakeholders around the concept of Enterprise Design (i.e. not architecture)
  • 28. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 328 › As the pace of change and impact of disruption increase, and the ‘shelf life’ for Business Models decreases, we will see emerging demand for Enterprise Design skills › To support this demand, the mandate of EA must increase to be about creating coherent Business Models › However, we won’t be asked: EA has the opportunity to ‘step up’ and lead The Design of Business: but we must consciously move away from the Operating Model level and develop the competencies to redesign and prototype new business models Our universe is expanding… Putting it into perspective You are here
  • 29. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 329 End of part one….! Thanks
  • 30. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 330 Approach and Case Study The Capability- Driven Roadmap
  • 31. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 331 Failure points between strategy and implementation In navigating between strategy and execution there are multiple possible failure points STRATEGY PROGRAMMES    Strategy not sufficiently tied to operations Needed capabilities not properly understood or measured Planners not accountable for delivery Benefits aren’t quantified or traced back to original goals The drivers of strategy are often misaligned  This often leads to some typical stakeholder issues regarding transformation exercises Are we investing in the right areas across the enterprise? Is my investment portfolio balanced across all of the economic value add dimensions? Are the strategic programs aligned, or for that matter, are they the right strategic programmes? There is a lot of activity going on out there, how do I know we are doing the right things? Where can we take advantage of synergies across the major strategic programmes?
  • 32. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 332 STRATEGY PROGRAMMES    Strategy not sufficiently tied to operations Needed capabilities not properly understood or measured Planners not accountable for delivery Benefits aren’t quantified or traced back to original goals The drivers of strategy are often misaligned  Addressing the failure points between strategy and implementation › To address these failure points we should focus on the following three areas: 1. Creating a clear view of the goals, value drivers and corresponding levers that drive the strategy 2. Clearly linking the strategy to operations through capabilities 3. Establishing the resources that are needed by the capabilities and ensuring business architects provide oversight at portfolio level
  • 33. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 333 Developing the Capability Driven Roadmap The Challenge: creating traceability from strategy to implementation Transitioning Capability uplift delivered in increments through business & technology change Technology decisions must be traced back to a business objective via the capabilities they enable Motivations Business Model Capability Model Maturity & Gaps Target Architecture Current State Arch. Work Packages ‘Anchor Models’
  • 34. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 334 What is the Business Motivation Model? The BMM is a Blueprint to help develop the Business Architecture, and provides a consistent language to articulate business strategy The BMM is a construct for developing business plans, but is not in itself a methodology. The BMM structure supports the progression from Vision to a set of concrete Goals and Objectives Mission Strategies Tactics Vision Goals Objectives Outcome CAPABILITY People Process Tools
  • 35. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 335 What is a Capability? › An ability that an organization, person, or system possesses. Capabilities are typically expressed in general and high-level terms and typically require a combination of organization, people, processes, and technology to achieve. For example, marketing, customer contact, or outbound telemarketing. – The Open Group › The power or ability to do something – Oxford English Dictionary › Measure of the ability of an entity (department, organization, person, system) to achieve its objectives, specially in relation to its overall mission. – Business Dictionary › The ability to perform or achieve certain actions or outcomes through a set of controllable and measurable faculties, features, functions, processes, or services. – Wikipedia Some Definitions
  • 36. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 336 Identifying Capabilities › All enterprises have ‘capabilities’ – they are the fundamental business outcomes of the enterprise » Capabilities are the things the enterprise must be able to DO in order to fulfil its mission › Capabilities will tend to persist over time » what changes is the way in which the capability is fulfilled (the ‘How’), who is fulfilling the capability, where it takes place and their importance to the business strategy › Capabilities are expressed as outcomes and should be agnostic of technology, product, organisational unit, etc. » Meaning the same capability could be performed by different organisation units or in different contexts, potentially in different ways Some Guidelines
  • 37. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 337 Linking Business and IT Architectures Business Architecture will define the capabilities required to realise and sustain the business strategy. IT Architectures will help to enable these capabilities. CUSTOMER PRODUCT PROCESS PEOPLE APPLICATIONS DATA INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Business Architecture Information Technology Architecture CAPABILITY People Process Tools Requires Uses
  • 38. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 338 Case Study Capability Model transposed into ADOit Business Capability Model
  • 39. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 340 Current State and Target State Application Architecture views in ADOit Mapping of Capabilities to Applications Transition Plan ?
  • 40. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 341 Transition Plan Capability Increments & Dimensions Capabilities Capability Increments People Dimension Individual Training Collective Training Professional Development Process Dimension Concepts Business Processes Information Management Material Dimension Infrastructure Information Technology Equipment Objectives
  • 41. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 342 Delivering Strategic Architecture ACL Austraclear Exigo BAF Bloomberg Cashflow Reporting ComBizCorporate Online HED Navision (AP) Navision (AR)Navision (Assets) Navision (Cash Management)Navision (GL) Navision (PO) Navision (Project Costing)Navision (Resource Costing) NemPower - NemFuture Procuregate ProcureMax SmartData Online Visual Risk FleetWatch 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 1.1 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 1.1 BusinessValue ITValue ApplicationPortfolioView (Finance & TreasurySystems) BusinessValue vs IT Value Keep MaintainingUpgrade Technology Leverage TechnologyRetire or Replace Business Median IT Median Creating traceability from strategy to implementation
  • 42. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 343 The Roadmap Viewpoint Viewpoint Element Description Stakeholders: Business Executives, Business Managers, Business SME’s, IT Executives, Portfolio and Programme Managers, Project Managers, Organisational Change Management Concerns: • How are my strategic objectives being realised through my architecture and program of work? • What are the changes between the current state and the future state of the architecture? • What is my current investment roadmap to achieve the required changes? • Where are the dependencies across the program of work? View Description: Provides a view of the amalgamated means to end chain describing the strategic capability direction for the organisation, and the associated transition plan required to realise the vision. The primary intent of the roadmap is to inform the detailed program of work. It is not the intent of the roadmap to be an executable program but a key input into the defining the detailed program of work. Metamodel Concepts Mission, Vision, Goals, Strategies, Objectives, Drivers, Assumptions Capabilities, Roles, Process, Logical application, Logical technology, Risk Model The EA Roadmap Model
  • 43. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 344 EA Delivery Roadmap
  • 44. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 345 An Overview of Roadmap › The strategic context for the organisation. This looks to describe the program vision, goals, objectives. › The outcomes of the program streams are mapped to the business objectives providing traceability from program initiatives to strategic objectives. › Architecture principles provide rationale and context for the target state. › The strategic initiatives designed to realise the target state. Any cross- program dependencies are identified. A view of the current state technology landscape, highlights issues and gaps across the technology landscape. The outcomes of the program streams are mapped to the corporate risk register providing visibility of risks addressed by the program. › The intended target state provides visibility of where the program will land. This section will demonstrate an increase in business capability and a simplification of the technology landscape.
  • 45. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 346 www.enterprisearchitects.com david.ohara@enterprisearchitects.com Thank You
  • 46. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 347 Our Locations
  • 47. | DOCUMENT TITLE | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 348 References and Acknowledgments › The Dimensions of Digital Disruption » Mark P McDonald, Gartner › The Innovator’s Dilemma » www.claytonchristensen.com › The Business Model Innovation Factory – how to stay relevant when the world is changing » Saul Kaplan › Alexander Osterwalder – strategiser › Gartner Hype cycle for Enterprise Architecture 2013 › Customer CEO » Chuck Wall › Digital Disruption – unleashing the next wave of innovation » James McQuivey › Discipline of the Market Makers » Treacy & Wiersma › The Business Motivation Model » Object Management Group These people and ideas have helped shape our thinking