Price Models

393 views
300 views

Published on

This slide set is a work in progress and is embedded in my Principles of Finance course, which is also a work in progress, that I teach to computer scientists and engineers
http://financefortechies.weebly.com/

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
393
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
109
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Price Models

  1. 1. Price  Models  
  2. 2. Learning  Objec-ves       ¨  Models     ¤  A  mathema-cal  or  physical  representa-on  of  a  hypothesis,  theory,   or  law   ¤  Simplifica-on  of  reality  for  decision  making  and  design     ¨  Models  for  dynamical  systems     n  Determinis-c,  Stochas(c,  Complex     ¨  Security  price  and  return  rate  models     ¨  Review  of  probability  and  sta-s-cs       2  
  3. 3. A  Financial  Game     ¨  Would  you  play  a  financial  game  with     ¤  a  90%  probability  of  gaining  $200  and     ¤  a  10%  probability  of  losing    $100  ?     ¨  Alterna-vely,  would  you  take  $20  with  certainty  ?       ¨  In  probability  and  sta(s(cs,  you  studied  decision  making  with  uncertainty     ¤  But  it  was  actually  decision  making  with  risk  !       ¤  Expected  value:      $200  ·∙  .90  -­‐  $100  ·∙  .1  =  $170     ¤  What  does  that  calcula-on  really  mean?    Is  it  ra-onal  to  play  this  financial   game?       ¤  I  would  guess  that  most  of  you  would  take  the  $20  ,  why  ?   3  
  4. 4. Ques-ons   ¨  Your  common  sense  likely  tells  you  that  too  much  uncertainty  and  risk   remain  in  the  game     ¤  How  many  -mes  can  I  play  the  game?     ¤  What’s  the  dura-on  of  the  game?     ¤  Are  there  any  other  alterna-ve  games?   ¤  Any  opportunity  cost  ?     ¤  How  much  money  do  I  have?     ¤  Is  there  any  risk  of  not  geng  paid?   ¤  Does  ‘probability’  (expected    value)  even  apply  to  a  single  game?         ¤  Other  ?       ¨  Actually  there’s  a  difference  between  risk  and  uncertainty,  but  we’ll   explore  that  in  a  later  chapter     4  
  5. 5. Review  Of  Probability   ¨  Random  Variable     ¤  Can  take  on  different  values  unlike  determinis(c  variables   ¤  Values  come  from  experiments,  measurements,  random  processes     n  Say  x  is  a  random  variable  with  a  -me  sequence  of  values  xi  produced   by  a  random  process,  X                 ¤  Random  does  not  necessarily  mean  that  there  is  no  underlying  structure   n  The  structure  is  defined  by  a  probability  distribu-on  characterized  by   parameters  and  sta(s(cs         5   Random   process   X   Random   variable   x   Random   sequence   xi        
  6. 6. Review  Of  Probability   ¨  Expected  Value     ¤  The  expected  value  of  a  random  variable,  x,  is  the  weighted  value  of  m   possible  values  or  outcomes           ¤  Example           ¤  This  calculate  implies  that  each  outcome,  xi,  is  independent  of  the  other  m-­‐1   outcomes     n  Thus  no  condi-onal  dependencies  between  the  m  outcomes   n  How  do  we  determine  Pr[xi]    ?     6   [ ] [ ] i m 1i i xxPrxE ⋅= ∑= [ ] [ ] 170$100$1.200$90.xxPrxE i 2 1i i =⋅−⋅=⋅= ∑=
  7. 7. 7  
  8. 8. Review  Of  Probability   ¨  Law  of  Large  Numbers  (LLN)   ¤  If  x  is  an  independent  and  iden-cally  distributed  random  variable  (IID),  the  sum  sn/n   converges  to  the  expected  value  of  x,  A,  as  n  approaches  infinity                       ¨  Variance:    Average  squared  error  from  the  mean         ¨  Standard  Devia-on             8                    x n 1 n s            x...xxxs n 1i i n n21 n 1i in ∑ ∑ = = ⋅= +++=≡ [ ] [ ] [ ]( ) 222 BxExExVar ≡−= [ ] AnsE A n s E        n      As n n ⋅→ →⎥⎦ ⎤ ⎢⎣ ⎡ ∞→ [ ] [ ] BxVarxSD ≡=
  9. 9. Review  Of  Probability   ¨  Independent  random  variables:  No  condi-onal  dependence         ¨  If  y  is  a  lagged  sequence  of  x,  then       ¨  Linear  (Pearson)  correla-on,  ρ,    is  a  measure  of  linear  dependence  and  is   commonly  used  for  ellip(cally  distributed     random  variables,  x  and  y       ¨  Ellip-cally  distributed  random  variables  include  Gaussian,    t-­‐distribu-on,  Cauchy,   Laplace,  Logis-cs,    etc.   ¨  Otherwise  non-­‐correla-on  does  not  imply  independence     ¨  Checks  for  independence  of  an  ellip-c  random  variable  x  start  with  checking     auto-­‐correla-on  of  x,  and  its  square,  x2,  or  its  de-­‐trended  square  (x-­‐E(x))2           9   ]Pr[x]x,...,x,x|Pr[x i02i-­‐1i-­‐i = [ ] [ ]( ) [ ]( )[ ] yx DSDS yEyxExE yx,ρ ⋅ −⋅− = Pr[x]y]|Pr[x =
  10. 10. Game  Model     ¨  Let’s  develop  a  ‘stochas-c  model’  for  the  financial  game     ¨  Say  that  your  wealth  at  -me  i  or  ti  is  Si   ¤  Integer  periods,  i,  and  discrete  -me,  ti   ¨  You  play  the  game  between  -me  i-­‐1  and  -me  i  over  -me  Δt  =  ti  –  ti-­‐1   ¨  Your  gain  or  loss    (return  or  change  in  wealth)  is  ΔSi  for  that  ith  game         ¨  Your  ini-al  wealth  is  S0  at  -me  i  =  0    or  t0=0.0     ¨  The  implica-on  is  that  the  original  game  is  played     only  once     10    ΔS  SS i1i-­‐i += 101 S  SS Δ+= i-­‐1   ti-­‐1   Si-­‐1   ΔSi   i                     ti                               Si    
  11. 11. Game  Model       ¨  You  can  also  compute  the  variance,  Var,  and  standard  devia-on,  SD,  of   the  game                 11   [ ] [ ] [ ]( ) [ ] $908,100      ΔSSD $  8,10028,900-­‐  1,00036,000                               $1700.10$100)(0.90$200                               ΔSEΔSEΔSVar 2 222 22 == =+= −⋅−+⋅= −= -­‐100        200     Outcome     Frequency  
  12. 12. Game  Model     ¨  Now  say  that  you  could  play  the  financial  game  a  number  of  -mes,  n           ¨  In  each  game  the  probabili-es  and  payoffs  for  the  game  remain  the    same,  thus   the  wealth  increments,  ΔSi,  are  independent  and  iden(cally  distributed  (IID)   ¨  The  variance  is  also  finite,  its  8,100  $2,  thus  ΔS  is  IID/FV   ¨  One  of  the  most  important  sta-s-cal     principles  is  that    sums  of  IID/  FV       random  variables,  e.g.,  ΔS  approach     normal  distribu-on  as  n  becomes     large  (Central  Limit  Theorem)     12   ∑= +=+= +++= n 1i i00n n210n  ΔSSΔS  SS ΔS...ΔSΔSSS [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] BnΔSDS                               BnΔSVar                               AnΔSE                               Bn  ,AnNΔS                                 BA,N n ΔS        n ΔSSS ΔS...ΔSΔSSS 2 2 2 0n n210n ⋅→ ⋅→ ⋅→ ⋅⋅→ →∞→ += +++=
  13. 13. Central  Limit  Theorem     13   0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 $13,000 $14,000 $15,000 $16,000 $17,000 $18,000 $19,000 $20,000 Frequency Gain  Per  100  Game  Sequence I  wrote  a  VB  program  that  ran  a   100  game  sequence  10,000   -mes.    I  computed  the  average   gain  per  game  sequence  and   ploled  a  histogram  of  the   sums.    The  observed  mean  sum   was  $17,002.         This  is  a  simula(on.     Would  you  play  the  game  a  100   -mes?  Would  you  play  it  one   -me?        
  14. 14. Central  Limit  Theorem     14   0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 $130 $135 $140 $145 $150 $155 $160 $165 $170 $175 $180 $185 $190 $195 $200 Frequency Average  Gain  Per  Game I  modified  the  program  to   compute  the  average  gain  per   game  in  each  of    10,000   sequences  and  ploled  a   histogram  of  these  average   gains.    The  observed  mean  gain   was  $170.02.      
  15. 15. Another  Game:    Coin  Flipping     ¨  Now  lets  play  another  financial  game  :  coin  flipping.       ¨  Say  you  gain  $10  on  heads  and  pay  $10  on  tails.                     Is  each  flip  an  independent  event?    With  the  same  probabili-es?  And  has   finite  variance?      Yes,  its  IID/FV   ¨  Coin  flipping  is  a  ‘fair  game’  since  the  expected  return  for  each  player   (counter  party)  is  zero  –  neither  player  has  an  expected  advantage     ¤  Coin  flipping  is  characterized  as  a  binomial  model     15   [ ] ( ) [ ] [ ] [ ]( ) [ ] ( ) [ ] $10$  100ΔSSD                100$.5$10.5$10ΔSE $    100ΔSEΔSEΔSVar                                  $0.5$10.5$10ΔSE 22222 222 ===⋅−+⋅= =−==⋅−+⋅=
  16. 16. Binomial  Model  for  Coin  Flipping     16   3  trials     40  trials     0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 $30 1   0.125   $20 1   0.250   $10 $10 1   3   0.500   0.375   $0 $0 1   2   1.000   0.500   -­‐$10 -­‐$10 1   3   0.500   0.375   -­‐$20 1   0.250   -­‐$30 1   0.125   -­‐$   -­‐$   -­‐$   -­‐$   1   2   4   8   1.000   1.000   1.000   1.000   Flips   Flips   Flips   Binomial   tree  
  17. 17. Another  Game:    Die  Rolling     ¨  Using  a  single  die,  if  you  roll  a  6  then  you  receive  $110,  while   any  other  outcome  results  in  you  paying  $10     17   [ ] ( ) [ ] ( ) [ ] [ ] [ ]( ) [ ] $44.72$  2,000ΔSD   $    000,2100100,2ΔSEΔSEΔSar $    100,2110$ 6 1 $10-­‐ 6 5 ΔSE 10$110$ 6 1 $10-­‐ 6 5 ΔSE 2 222 2222 == =−=−= =⋅+⋅= =⋅+⋅= S V
  18. 18. 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 -­‐$400 $0 $400 $800 $1,200 $1,600 $2,000 $2,400 $2,800 Frequency Gain  Per  100  Roll  Sequence Another  Game:    Die  Rolling     18   I  modified  the  program  and  ran  the  100   die  rolling  game  sequence  10,000  -mes.     I  computed  the  sums  for  the  100  rolls.   The  mean  was  $999.    
  19. 19. ‘Rate  Game’     ¨  Now  let’s  consider  a  game  defined  by  rates  of  gain  or  loss  (rates  of  return)   ¤  45%  chance  of  losing  1%   ¤  55%  chance  of  gaining  1.25%                 ¨  The  Central  Limit  Theorem  also  addresses     products  of  IID  /  FV  random  variables.    For     large  n,  the  future  value  factor,  fn,       approaches  a  log-­‐normal  distribu-on   ¨  If  f  is  lognormal,  what  does  that  imply  about  the   probability  distribu-on  of  r?       ¤  Nothing  other  than  its  IID/FV   19                         S S  r1 S SS  r )r(1SS 1i-­‐ i i 1i-­‐ 1i-­‐i i i1i-­‐i =+ − = +⋅= ( )...rrr...rrrrrr...rrr1S                                                  )r(1....)r(1)r(1  S                              )r(1f                                                                    fS)r(1S    S 3213231213210 n210 n 1i inn0 n 1i i0n +⋅⋅++⋅+⋅+⋅+++++⋅= +⋅⋅+⋅+⋅= +=⋅=+⋅= ∏∏ ==
  20. 20. ‘Rate  Game’     ¨  We  can  compute  the  mean,  a,  and  variance,  d2,  of  r               ¨  We  can  also  compute  the  mean,  mode,  median,  and  variance  of    f  –  but   we  need  to  know  more  about  lognormal  distribu-ons,  so  let’s  delay  for   now   20   ( ) rof    variance        ar n 1 d rof    value  mean                                  r n 1 a n 1i 2 i 2 n 1i i ∑ ∑ = = −⋅≡ ⋅≡              NL~    )r(1f n 1i in ∏= +=
  21. 21. ‘Rate  Game’:  Log  Normal  Distribu-on   21   I again modified the VB program for a sequence of 50 rate games. I ran the sequence 10,000 times. I computed the accumulated future value factor for each sequence and plotted this histogram. So there are 10,000 observations in the histogram. The accumulated mean future value factor for 50 games was 1.126.
  22. 22. Another  ‘Rate  Game’     ¨  Now  lets  play  the  same  rate  game  again  but  track  the  natural  log  of  your  wealth,   ln(S),  instead  of  your  wealth,  S       ¨  Define  the  rate  of  return  for  natural  log  wealth,  vi,    instead  of  the  rate  of  return,  ri,   on  wealth  (r  is  the  simple  rate  of  return)     22   ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) )rln(1           S SS 1ln           S S ln  v   SlnSlnv vSln    Sln i 1i 1ii 1i i i 1iii i1i-­‐i += ⎟⎟ ⎠ ⎞ ⎜⎜ ⎝ ⎛ − += ⎟⎟ ⎠ ⎞ ⎜⎜ ⎝ ⎛ = −= += − − − − i i v 1ii 1i iv 1i i i eSS S S e S S lnv ⋅= = ⎟⎟ ⎠ ⎞ ⎜⎜ ⎝ ⎛ = − − − ( ) )eln(e    S SSln ==                       1 S S  r 1i-­‐ i i −=
  23. 23. Another  ‘Rate  Game’  Con-nued     ¨  So  the  equivalent  rate  game  which  tracks  the  natural  log  of  wealth,  ln(S),  is     ¤  45%  chance  of  losing  .995%  of  your  natural  log  wealth  =  ln(1-­‐1%)   ¤  55%  chance  of  gaining  1.242%  of  your  natural  log  wealth  =  ln(1+1.25%)     ¨  The  Central  Limit  Theorem  typically  addresses  sums  of  IID  /  FV  random   variables.    For  large  n,  the  sum  of  natural  log  rates,  sn,  approaches  a   normal  distribu-on                       23   ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) N~vs vSln    Sln v...vvSln    Sln n 1i in n 1i i0n n210n ∑ ∑ = = = += ++++=
  24. 24. Another  ‘Rate  Game’  Con-nued     ¨  The  mean,  u,  and  variance,  s2,  of  v  can  be  calculated  as  before             ¨  So  v  is  normally  distributed     ¨  The  normal  distribu-on  has  many  nice  quali-es  including     ¤  Dependence  is  defined  by  linear  correla-on   ¤  The  parameters  that  define  the  PDF  are  also  the  sta-s-cs  –  mean  and  variance     ¤  The  sta-s-cs  are  scalable   24   [ ]2 su,N~v ( ) vof    variance        uv n 1 s vof    value  mean        v n 1 u n 1i 2 i 2 n 1i i ∑ ∑ = = −⋅≡ ⋅≡ [ ]2 su,2222N~ ⋅⋅[ ]2 su,N~v If  u  is  the  daily  mean  and  s2  is  the  daily   variance  of  natural  log  return  rate  v       Then  the  monthly  rate  of  return  is  also   normal  with  mean  22·∙u  and  variance  22·∙s2         This  is  not  true  for  a  lognormal  distributed   random  variable    
  25. 25. Central  Limit  Theorem     25   ( ) ( ) ( ) )rln(1..)rln(1)rln(1Sln                       )rln(1Sln    Sln n210 n 1i i0n +++++++= ++= ∑= The  sum  of  a  large  number  of  IID/FV   random  variables  is  approximately   normally  distributed   Sums  of  v  and  ln(1+r)  -­‐  natural  log  rates   of  return  -­‐  approach  normal  distribu-on   )r(1....)r(1)r(1  S             )r(1S    S n210 n 1i i0n +⋅⋅+⋅+⋅= +⋅= ∏= The  product  of  a  large  number  of  IID/FV   random  variables  is  approximately   lognormally  distributed   Products  of  (1+r)  and  ev  -­‐  future  value   factors  –  approach  lognormal   distribu-on   ( ) [ ] ( ) [ ]2 i 2 n 1i i s  u,N~r1ln sn  u,nN~r1ln + ⋅⋅+∑= [ ]2 n 1i i sn  u,nNL~)r(1 ⋅⋅+∏= The  same  parameters,  u  and  s2,define   the  lognormal  pdf  but  are  not  the   mean  and  variance  of  the  lognormal   distribu-on      
  26. 26. 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1/3/1950 11/7/1956 9/12/1963 7/17/1970 5/21/1977 3/25/1984 1/28/1991 12/2/1997 10/6/2004 SPX  Price  From  1950  to  2011   26   SPX  price  from  1950  to  2011   15,472  days     Latest Chart
  27. 27. SPX  Daily  Ln  Return  Rates   27   15,471  daily  natural  log   return  rates  from     1950  to  2011  
  28. 28. SPX  Daily  Ln  Rate  Histogram   28   15,471  daily  natural  log   return  rates  from     1950  to  2011     Appears  to  be  ‘somewhat   normal’,  but  is  leptokur-c   and  skewed   Mean:  Expected  value     Median:  50%  probable  value     Mode:  Highest  frequency     Again  the  CLT  says  that  large  sums  of  natural  log  daily  rates  approach  a  normal  distribu-on,  but   we’ve  made  no  comment  on  the  daily  rates  themselves  other  than  assume  that  they’re  IID/FV  
  29. 29. Stock  Inves-ng     ¨  The  stock  prices  and  returns  can  be  modeled  by  either   ¤  Natural  log  stock  prices,  ln(S),    and  natural  log  rates  of  return,  v,  or     ¤  Stock  prices,  S,  and  simple  rates  of  return,  r                 ¤  The  addi-ve  or  mul-plica-ve  central  limit  theorem  is  u-lized.       n                                     approaches  a  normal  distribu-on  (for  m  simula-ons)         n                                                   approaches  a  lognormal    distribu-on  (for  m  simula-ons)       ¤  The  distribu-on  of  v  and  r  is  not  yet  specified,  but  they  are  assumed  IID/FV     29   ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ∏∑ ∏∑ == == +=⎟⎟ ⎠ ⎞ ⎜⎜ ⎝ ⎛ =⎟⎟ ⎠ ⎞ ⎜⎜ ⎝ ⎛ +⋅=+= +⋅=+= n 1i i 0 n n 1i i 0 n n 1i i0n n 1i i0n i1i-­‐ii1i-­‐i )r(1 S S                                                            v S S ln )r(1S    S                                    vSln    Sln  )r(1SS                                              vSln    Sln ∑= n 1i iv ∏= + n 1i i)r(1 0        1          2                      i-­‐1        i                              n-­‐1        n  
  30. 30. Standard  Price  Models     30   1i-­‐ 1i-­‐i i i1i-­‐i S SS  r )r(1SS − = +⋅= [ ]2 n 1i i sn  u,nNL~)r(1 ⋅⋅+∏= If  r  is  IID/FV  and  n  -­‐>  ∞   If  v  is  IID/FV  and  n  -­‐>  ∞   [ ]2 n 1i i sn  u,nN~v ⋅⋅∑= ( ) ( ) ⎟⎟ ⎠ ⎞ ⎜⎜ ⎝ ⎛ = += −1i i i i1i-­‐i S S lnv vSln    Sln 0        1          2                      i-­‐1        i                              n-­‐1        n   n·∙u  and  n·∙s2  are  PDF   parameters  but  not  sta-s-cs     n·∙u  and  n·∙s2  are  both  PDF   parameters  and  sta-s-cs  –   the  mean  and  the  variance    
  31. 31. Standard  Price  Model   ¨  Standard  finance  theory  assumes  v  and  r  are  IID/FV  and  use  the  addi-ve  and   mul-plica-ve  CLTs  and  resul-ng  normal  and  lognormal  pdfs  for  sums  and   products         ¨  In  addi-on,  vi  and  ri  ,  are  related  as  follows   ¤  Thus  r  and  v  cannot  have  the  same  probability  distribu-on       ¨  So  standard  finance  models  make  the  simplest  addi(onal  assump-on:    Natural  log   rates,  v,  are  normally  distributed  which  then  requires  that  simple  return  rates,  r,   are  lognormally  distributed         ¨  However  some  finance  methods,  i.e.,  single  period  methods,  provide  useful   results  with  an  assump-on  that  simple  rates,  r,  are  normally  distributed,    but  this   assump-on  is  generally  inconsistent  with  the  standard  model       31   NL~)r(1f                            N~  v    s   n 1i in n 1i in ∏∑ == +== iv i e  )r(1 =+ [ ] [ ] [ ]2s,uN 2 v i s,uNLe)r1(                                            s,uN~v e  )r(1 2 i ==+ =+
  32. 32. Probability  Distribu-ons  Over  Time     32   -­‐75% -­‐50% -­‐25% 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 225% 250% 275% 300% Natural  log  rates,  v,   are  assumed   normal.    The  mean   and  variance  of  a   normal  distribu-on   scale  linear  in  -me     The  future  value  factors  (1+r)  are   assumed  log  normally  distributed.     The  mean  and  variance  do  not  scale   linearly  in  -me.  
  33. 33. Three  Alterna-ve  Models       ¨  Relax  the  finite  variance  assump-on   ¤  4  parameter  family  of  distribu-ons     generated  by  a  ‘Levy  stable’  process   ¤  Variance  doesn’t  converge  as  n  increases         ¨  Relax  the  IID  assump-on   ¤  introduce  a  simple  condi-onally     dependent,  stochas-c  vola-lity  model     ¤  GARCH  -me  series       ¨  Use  power  law  frequency  distribu-on   ¤  Very  common  distribu-on  in  nature   ¤  Scale  invariant       33   Simulated   vola-lity    
  34. 34. Essen-al  Concepts     ¨  Systems   ¤  Determinis-c:  includes  chao-c   ¤  Stochas-c:  sta-onary  (IID/FV)  and  non-­‐sta-onary   ¤  Complex:  including  self  organized  cri-cality  and  complex  adap-ve  systems   ¨  Standard  finance  models  assume   ¤  Natural  log  rates,  v,    natural  log  prices,  ln(S),  natural  log  of  future    value  factors,   ln(1+r)  are  normally  distributed   ¤  Simple  rates,  r,  future  value  factors,  ev  and  (1+r),  and  price,  S,  are  lognormally   distributed     ¨  Actually  the  standard  model  doesn’t  fit  historical  data  with  any  sta-s-cal   confidence,  but  the  model  is  useful,  but  has  limita-ons     ¤  Think  of  Newton’s  model  of  gravity     ¨  Alterna-ve  models  that  do  fit  historical  data  beler  have  not  been  as   generally  useful  as  the  standard  model  in  a  variety  of  applica-ons     34  
  35. 35. Addendum:  Links  &  Sta-s-cs  Nota-on     ¨  Links     ¤  Scien-fic  American   ¤  A  Standard  Model  Skep-c   ¤  Predic-on  Markets     ¤  TradeKing  API     ¨  Rate  nota-on  summary     35   Rate Periodic   mean   Annual   mean Periodic   standard   deviation Annual   standard   deviation Rate   pdf a α g γ v u µ s σ Normal d  =  SD(r)  =  SD(1+r) r d δ Log   normal
  36. 36. Addendum:  More  Review  Of  Probability   ¨  Random  number  generator     ¤  Actually  genera-ng  a  IID/  FV  random  variable   ¤  Again,  random  doesn’t  only  mean  IID/FV  random     ¤  Excel     n  rand()      uniform  between  0  and  1     n  Normsinv(rand())      normally  distributed  ~N[0,1]   n  Norminv(rand(),µ, σ)      normally  distributed  ~N[µ, σ]   ¨  Importance  of  IID  /  FV  character  of  a  random  variable     ¤  IID    -­‐>    Law  of  large  numbers    -­‐>  Expected  value     ¤  IID  /  FV  -­‐>  Probability  density  func-ons  for  random  variable                            -­‐>  Central  limit  theorem  -­‐>    Normal  and  lognormal  distribu-ons  for  sums  and                                          products  of  random  variable  regardless  of  pdf  for  random  variable  itself                        -­‐>  Produced  by  a  sta-onary  random  process                   36  
  37. 37. Addendum:    Logarithms  and  the  CLT     37                                                       )xln(xln )yln()xln()yxln( n 1i i n 1i i ∑∏ == =⎟⎟ ⎠ ⎞ ⎜⎜ ⎝ ⎛ +=⋅ Natural  logs  are  usually  introduced  as  follows     The  rela-onship  is  generalized  as  follows     Specializing  for  standard  finance     ( ) ( ) ( ) [ ] ( ) [ ] [ ]                                                     sn,unNL~e~r1             sn,unN~vr1ln  r1ln r1x 2sn,unN n 1i i 2 n 1i i n 1i i n 1i i ii 2 ⋅⋅+∴ ⋅⋅=+=⎟⎟ ⎠ ⎞ ⎜⎜ ⎝ ⎛ + += ⋅⋅ = === ∏ ∑∑∏

×