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SPECIAL EVENT Social Entrepreneurship Training: Developing Community Capital “Beyond Sustainability”
 

SPECIAL EVENT Social Entrepreneurship Training: Developing Community Capital “Beyond Sustainability”

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Are you engaging your community as effectively as you could, whether for your business, product launch, event, or fundraising campaign? This Social Entrepreneurship Training will teach you the newest ...

Are you engaging your community as effectively as you could, whether for your business, product launch, event, or fundraising campaign? This Social Entrepreneurship Training will teach you the newest trends in corporate innovation, social responsibility, triple-bottom line accounting, and strategic partnership building. After this seminar, accelerate your impact in the markets and communities you serve. Come join us to make a profound, values-driven shift to better engage your community “beyond sustainability.”

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    SPECIAL EVENT Social Entrepreneurship Training: Developing Community Capital “Beyond Sustainability” SPECIAL EVENT Social Entrepreneurship Training: Developing Community Capital “Beyond Sustainability” Presentation Transcript

    • Social Entrepreneurship  Workshop
    • Social Entrepreneurship Workshop
    • Social Entrepreneurship Workshop Developing Your Community Capital ‘Beyond Sustainability’
    • PART I: Wilford Welch
    • PART I: Wilford Welch Former US Diplomat, business consultant, author of The Tactics of Hope: How Social Entrepreneurs Are Changing Our World
    • PART I: Wilford Welch Former US Diplomat, business consultant, author of The Tactics of Hope: How Social Entrepreneurs Are Changing Our World PART II: David Hopkins
    • PART I: Wilford Welch Former US Diplomat, business consultant, author of The Tactics of Hope: How Social Entrepreneurs Are Changing Our World PART II: David Hopkins Speaker, entrepreneur, co-author, The Tactics of Hope, social entrepreneurship champion for the millennial generation
    • PART I: Wilford Welch Former US Diplomat, business consultant, author of The Tactics of Hope: How Social Entrepreneurs Are Changing Our World PART II: David Hopkins Speaker, entrepreneur, co-author, The Tactics of Hope, social entrepreneurship champion for the millennial generation PART III: Kene Turner
    • PART I: Wilford Welch Former US Diplomat, business consultant, author of The Tactics of Hope: How Social Entrepreneurs Are Changing Our World PART II: David Hopkins Speaker, entrepreneur, co-author, The Tactics of Hope, social entrepreneurship champion for the millennial generation PART III: Kene Turner Social entrepreneur, motivational speaker, community engagement change agent, president of EpiLife Consulting, Inc.
    • Goals and Outcomes
    • Goals and Outcomes Wilford - Part I
    • Goals and Outcomes Wilford - Part I 1. Root causes of the sustainability crisis
    • Goals and Outcomes Wilford - Part I 1. Root causes of the sustainability crisis 2. Why a shift in values and priorities is imperative
    • Goals and Outcomes Wilford - Part I 1. Root causes of the sustainability crisis 2. Why a shift in values and priorities is imperative 3. Values and priorities for sustainable communities
    • Goals and Outcomes Wilford - Part I 1. Root causes of the sustainability crisis 2. Why a shift in values and priorities is imperative 3. Values and priorities for sustainable communities David - Part II
    • Goals and Outcomes Wilford - Part I 1. Root causes of the sustainability crisis 2. Why a shift in values and priorities is imperative 3. Values and priorities for sustainable communities David - Part II 1. Significance of social entrepreneurship to our future
    • Goals and Outcomes Wilford - Part I 1. Root causes of the sustainability crisis 2. Why a shift in values and priorities is imperative 3. Values and priorities for sustainable communities David - Part II 1. Significance of social entrepreneurship to our future 2. How SEs develop community capital
    • Goals and Outcomes Wilford - Part I 1. Root causes of the sustainability crisis 2. Why a shift in values and priorities is imperative 3. Values and priorities for sustainable communities David - Part II 1. Significance of social entrepreneurship to our future 2. How SEs develop community capital 3. Models and case studies to learn from and replicate
    • Goals and Outcomes Wilford - Part I 1. Root causes of the sustainability crisis 2. Why a shift in values and priorities is imperative 3. Values and priorities for sustainable communities David - Part II 1. Significance of social entrepreneurship to our future 2. How SEs develop community capital 3. Models and case studies to learn from and replicate Kene - Part III
    • Goals and Outcomes Wilford - Part I 1. Root causes of the sustainability crisis 2. Why a shift in values and priorities is imperative 3. Values and priorities for sustainable communities David - Part II 1. Significance of social entrepreneurship to our future 2. How SEs develop community capital 3. Models and case studies to learn from and replicate Kene - Part III 1. A social entrepreneurship toolkit for community engagement
    • Goals and Outcomes Wilford - Part I 1. Root causes of the sustainability crisis 2. Why a shift in values and priorities is imperative 3. Values and priorities for sustainable communities David - Part II 1. Significance of social entrepreneurship to our future 2. How SEs develop community capital 3. Models and case studies to learn from and replicate Kene - Part III 1. A social entrepreneurship toolkit for community engagement 2. Lessons from EpiLife Consulting’s work in communities
    • Goals and Outcomes Wilford - Part I 1. Root causes of the sustainability crisis 2. Why a shift in values and priorities is imperative 3. Values and priorities for sustainable communities David - Part II 1. Significance of social entrepreneurship to our future 2. How SEs develop community capital 3. Models and case studies to learn from and replicate Kene - Part III 1. A social entrepreneurship toolkit for community engagement 2. Lessons from EpiLife Consulting’s work in communities 3. Creating your own action steps for community engagement
    • PART I: The Values Shift
    • We are living through one of the most fundamental shifts in history – a change in the actual belief structure of society No economic, political, or military power can compare with the power of a change of mind. By deliberately changing our images of reality, people are changing the world.’’ Re-envisioning humanity’s relationship to the natural world will require a fundamental shift in the core values that shape our dealings with the Earth and each other. - Willis Harman, author, Global Mind Change A sustainable world will only be possible by thinking differently With nature and not machines as their inspiration, today’s innovators are showing how to create a different future by learning to see the larger systems of which they are a part and to foster collaboration across every imaginable boundary. These core capabilities – seeing systems, collaborating across boundaries and creating versus problem solving – form the underpinnings, and ultimately the tools and methods, for this shift in thinking. - Peter Senge, author, The Necessary Revolution
    • We have to find a new form of economy, an economy that knows how to govern its limits An economy that respects nature and acts at the service of man, a situation where political and humanistic choices govern the economy and not the other way around. We have to discover new economic relationships that move at a more natural pace. - Carlo Petrini, Founder of Slow Food We live at a moment of deep ignorance, when vital knowledge that humans have always possessed about who we are and where we live seems beyond our reach Through centuries of keen observation, interpretation, and the passing down of knowledge, our common ancestors understood that the wisdom underlying effective sustainable practices is built into the natural world. Today that wisdom is still held in its most pure and truthful forms by the indigenous peoples of the world.   - Bill McKibben, American environmentalist and author
    • Sustainable human communities are best modeled after nature’s eco-systems which themselves are communities of plants, animals, and micro- organisms that nurture and support each other. Thus the way to sustain life on a whole is to build and nurture a more human community. - Bill Plotkins, author, Nature and the Human Soul New Consciousness to Fix Old Problems We can not solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them. - Albert Einstein
    • The Root Causes of the Sustainability Crisis • The industrial revolution and market capitalism have been so successful that in the past 100 years, the world’s population has increased from 2 to 7 billion (it will soon be 9 billion) • We consumed more of the world’s resources in the past 50 years than in the previous 10,000 years combined • Renewable resource systems, including fresh water, agricultural land, and marine resources, can not satisfy future demand • Non-renewable resources, such as oil, also will not satisfy demand • Our belief that technology alone will solve our sustainability problems is misplaced
    • The Natural World and Indigenous Wisdoms provide values and practices that can help us • Nature, and the wisdoms of indigenous peoples, are sources of knowledge that modern man, in our headlong rush to modernity, dismissed as quaint and unimportant. • Like systems thinking and biomimicry, they are now being recognized as critical to our future sustainability.
    • 12 Value Shifts Leading to a Sustainable World Old Values Sustainable Values
    • 12 Value Shifts Leading to a Sustainable World Old Values Sustainable Values More is better 1. Enough is enough
    • 12 Value Shifts Leading to a Sustainable World Old Values Sustainable Values More is better 1. Enough is enough Me 2. We
    • 12 Value Shifts Leading to a Sustainable World Old Values Sustainable Values More is better 1. Enough is enough Me 2. We Transaction 3. Relationship
    • 12 Value Shifts Leading to a Sustainable World Old Values Sustainable Values More is better 1. Enough is enough Me 2. We Transaction 3. Relationship “They” must solve it 4. I am the solution
    • 12 Value Shifts Leading to a Sustainable World Old Values Sustainable Values More is better 1. Enough is enough Me 2. We Transaction 3. Relationship “They” must solve it 4. I am the solution Growth/Profits 5. People, planet, profits
    • 12 Value Shifts Leading to a Sustainable World Old Values Sustainable Values More is better 1. Enough is enough Me 2. We Transaction 3. Relationship “They” must solve it 4. I am the solution Growth/Profits 5. People, planet, profits Take, Make, Waste 6. Conscious use of resources
    • 12 Value Shifts Leading to a Sustainable World Old Values Sustainable Values More is better 1. Enough is enough Me 2. We Transaction 3. Relationship “They” must solve it 4. I am the solution Growth/Profits 5. People, planet, profits Take, Make, Waste 6. Conscious use of resources Take from nature 7. Learn from nature
    • 12 Value Shifts Leading to a Sustainable World Old Values Sustainable Values More is better 1. Enough is enough Me 2. We Transaction 3. Relationship “They” must solve it 4. I am the solution Growth/Profits 5. People, planet, profits Take, Make, Waste 6. Conscious use of resources Take from nature 7. Learn from nature Money is power 8. Money is energy
    • 12 Value Shifts Leading to a Sustainable World Old Values Sustainable Values More is better 1. Enough is enough Me 2. We Transaction 3. Relationship “They” must solve it 4. I am the solution Growth/Profits 5. People, planet, profits Take, Make, Waste 6. Conscious use of resources Take from nature 7. Learn from nature Money is power 8. Money is energy Isolate and solve 9. Systems thinking
    • 12 Value Shifts Leading to a Sustainable World Old Values Sustainable Values More is better 1. Enough is enough Me 2. We Transaction 3. Relationship “They” must solve it 4. I am the solution Growth/Profits 5. People, planet, profits Take, Make, Waste 6. Conscious use of resources Take from nature 7. Learn from nature Money is power 8. Money is energy Isolate and solve 9. Systems thinking Top down 10. Bottoms up/top down
    • 12 Value Shifts Leading to a Sustainable World Old Values Sustainable Values More is better 1. Enough is enough Me 2. We Transaction 3. Relationship “They” must solve it 4. I am the solution Growth/Profits 5. People, planet, profits Take, Make, Waste 6. Conscious use of resources Take from nature 7. Learn from nature Money is power 8. Money is energy Isolate and solve 9. Systems thinking Top down 10. Bottoms up/top down Focus on Differences 11. Search for Common Ground
    • 12 Value Shifts Leading to a Sustainable World Old Values Sustainable Values More is better 1. Enough is enough Me 2. We Transaction 3. Relationship “They” must solve it 4. I am the solution Growth/Profits 5. People, planet, profits Take, Make, Waste 6. Conscious use of resources Take from nature 7. Learn from nature Money is power 8. Money is energy Isolate and solve 9. Systems thinking Top down 10. Bottoms up/top down Focus on Differences 11. Search for Common Ground Knowing it 12. Living it
    • 12 Value Shifts Leading to a Sustainable World Old Values Sustainable Values 1. Enough is enough 2. We 3. Relationship 4. I am the solution 5. People, planet, profits 6. Conscious use of resources 7. Learn from nature 8. Money is energy 9. Systems thinking 10. Bottoms up/top down 11. Search for Common Ground 12. Living it
    • Barriers to Changing our Ways? How do we move to a system that creates long-term abundance rather than short-term profit margins? • Consumers: Like any addicted personality, why should I give up things I enjoy now for a possible benefit in the future? • Businesses: The system, (metrics, and desires), all support the “more is better”, production/consumption and waste at all cost approach that has brought us to this point. I would be fired if I changed the business model that supports the “Three Ps” (People, planet and profit) • Politicians: The voters expect more, and I better give it to them if I want to be reelected.
    • Problem-Makers and Problem Solvers in Dying and Evolving Systems Deniers Text Social entrepreneurs Text Text Text Hospicing the old Husbanding the new Text 1800 Industrial Revolution & Market Capitalism 2010 2050
    • Passionate Individuals and Conscious Communities are Ideal Leaders of Barriers to Our Changing our Ways “The Shift” • Local communities are of manageable size • Communities are where experimentation, with rapid feedback, is possible • Local communities provide fertile ground for the next generation of leaders (eg.Van Jones) • Passionate social entrepreneurs operate best at the local level and are effective bridge-builders between the community, government and businesses
    • PART II: Lessons from Social Entrepreneurs
    • What is a social entrepreneur?
    • What is a social entrepreneur? n. society’s change agent, a pioneer of innovations that benefit humanity
    • What is a social entrepreneur? n. society’s change agent, a pioneer of innovations that benefit humanity entrepreneurs with a social or environmental mission
    • What is a social entrepreneur? n. society’s change agent, a pioneer of innovations that benefit humanity entrepreneurs with a social or environmental mission “Mission-driven capital bankers”: social, natural/ environmental, human, financial, technological
    • Characteristics of Social Entrepreneurs
    • Characteristics of Social Entrepreneurs • They focus on social and environmental challenges
    • Characteristics of Social Entrepreneurs • They focus on social and environmental challenges • They seek systemic solutions
    • Characteristics of Social Entrepreneurs • They focus on social and environmental challenges • They seek systemic solutions • They are “boundary-riders” who think “out of the box”
    • Characteristics of Social Entrepreneurs • They focus on social and environmental challenges • They seek systemic solutions • They are “boundary-riders” who think “out of the box” • They love scalability - where applicable
    • Characteristics of Social Entrepreneurs • They focus on social and environmental challenges • They seek systemic solutions • They are “boundary-riders” who think “out of the box” • They love scalability - where applicable • They collaborate across traditional boundaries
    • Characteristics of Social Entrepreneurs • They focus on social and environmental challenges • They seek systemic solutions • They are “boundary-riders” who think “out of the box” • They love scalability - where applicable • They collaborate across traditional boundaries • They implement, using for-profit, not-for-profit and hybrid models
    • Characteristics of Social Entrepreneurs • They focus on social and environmental challenges • They seek systemic solutions • They are “boundary-riders” who think “out of the box” • They love scalability - where applicable • They collaborate across traditional boundaries • They implement, using for-profit, not-for-profit and hybrid models • Unlike business entrepreneurs, they share their ideas
    • Bill Drayton, Founder, Ashoka http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DttTSJEO47g&feature=channel
    • “Social” (Community) Entrepreneurs
    • “Social” (Community) Entrepreneurs • Socius, societas: companion, associate, comrade, business partner
    • “Social” (Community) Entrepreneurs • Socius, societas: companion, associate, comrade, business partner • Communitatus: common, public, shared by many
    • “Social” (Community) Entrepreneurs • Socius, societas: companion, associate, comrade, business partner • Communitatus: common, public, shared by many • Industrial Revolution led to distinct division of professional and social roles, severely affecting the “relationship of exchange” between the consumer, producer, and seller
    • “Social” (Community) Entrepreneurs • Socius, societas: companion, associate, comrade, business partner • Communitatus: common, public, shared by many • Industrial Revolution led to distinct division of professional and social roles, severely affecting the “relationship of exchange” between the consumer, producer, and seller • Transaction-based relationships based on financial gains and bottom- line
    • “Social” (Community) Entrepreneurs • Socius, societas: companion, associate, comrade, business partner • Communitatus: common, public, shared by many • Industrial Revolution led to distinct division of professional and social roles, severely affecting the “relationship of exchange” between the consumer, producer, and seller • Transaction-based relationships based on financial gains and bottom- line • “Social” entrepreneurs collaborate beyond the local workplace to design solutions that are communal models
    • “Social” (Community) Entrepreneurs • Socius, societas: companion, associate, comrade, business partner • Communitatus: common, public, shared by many • Industrial Revolution led to distinct division of professional and social roles, severely affecting the “relationship of exchange” between the consumer, producer, and seller • Transaction-based relationships based on financial gains and bottom- line • “Social” entrepreneurs collaborate beyond the local workplace to design solutions that are communal models • The community becomes the marketplace of opportunity to exchange social and financial capital
    • 4 Methods of Community- Building for Social Entrepreneurs • Patient Capital and Slow Money • The Power of Online Connectivity • Localization / Globalization • The Role of Corporations
    • How Social Entrepreneurs Develop Community Capital
    • How Social Entrepreneurs Develop Community Capital Patient capital and the Slow Money Movement
    • How Social Entrepreneurs Develop Community Capital Patient capital and the Slow Money Movement • Long time horizons for the investment
    • How Social Entrepreneurs Develop Community Capital Patient capital and the Slow Money Movement • Long time horizons for the investment • Maximizing social, rather than financial, returns
    • How Social Entrepreneurs Develop Community Capital Patient capital and the Slow Money Movement • Long time horizons for the investment • Maximizing social, rather than financial, returns • Providing management support to help new business models thrive
    • • Debt or equity investments in early-stage enterprises providing low-income consumers access to healthcare, water, housing, alternative energy, or agricultural inputs • Typical commitments of patient capital: from $300k to $2.5 million in equity or debt; payback or exit in roughly five to seven years
    • • Strategic management consulting • Village capital ($40k credit, $50k venture) • Entrepreneurship fundamentals training • Communications, web, and media • Business planning and investor pitch expertise • Networking in the community
    • • $71 million in loans in 4 years • 573,000 lenders • 239,000 entrepreneurs • Average loan $100 • Repayment rate 98%
    • • $71 million in loans in 4 years • 573,000 lenders • 239,000 entrepreneurs • Average loan $100 • Repayment rate 98%
    • Peer-to-peer internet microloans • $71 million in loans in 4 years • 573,000 lenders • 239,000 entrepreneurs • Average loan $100 • Repayment rate 98%
    • Peer-to-peer internet microloans • $71 million in loans in 4 years • 573,000 lenders • 239,000 entrepreneurs • Average loan $100 • Repayment rate 98%
    • Peer-to-peer internet microloans • $71 million in loans in 4 years • 573,000 lenders • 239,000 entrepreneurs • Average loan $100 • Repayment rate 98%
    • Peer-to-peer internet microloans • $71 million in loans in 4 years • 573,000 lenders • 239,000 entrepreneurs • Average loan $100 • Repayment rate 98%
    • Peer-to-peer internet microloans • $71 million in loans in 4 years • 573,000 lenders • 239,000 entrepreneurs • Average loan $100 • Repayment rate 98%
    • Pioneering non-profit, financial services organization dedicated to transforming the way the world works with money. In partnership with a community of investors and donors, RSF provides capital to non-profit and for-profit social enterprises addressing these key issues:
    • Building Community Capital with the Online Connectivity
    • Bringing Global Issues to the Local Community Level
    • From Globalization to Localization “Businesses in local living economies remain human-scale and locally- owned, fostering direct, authentic, and meaningful relationships with employees, customers, suppliers, neighbors, and local habitat, adding to the quality of life in our communities... from distant board rooms to local communities where there is a short distance between business decision-makers and those affected by the decisions… Success can mean more than increasing market-share, it can be measured by increasing happiness and well being, deepening relationships, and expanding creativity, knowledge, and consciousness.” —Judy Wicks, “Local Living Economies: The New Movement for Responsible Business”
    • 10/10/10 Event Highlights Funniest: Sumo wrestlers cycling to practice in downtown Tokyo. Most remote: An education center in the Namib Desert in Namibia installing six solar panels. Most presidential: President Mohamed Nasheed of the Maldives is installing solar panels on his roof. Most tipsy: Partiers in Edinburgh will be throwing a "Joycott" (a reverse boycott) at a local bar that agreed to put 20% of its extra revenues on 10/10/10 to making the bar more energy efficient. Attendees will try and drink as much as possible to raise money. Cheers!
    • • Enterprise development • Urban agriculture program • Community outreach and education
    • Coral Reef Restoration Project, Bali
    • Coral Reef Restoration Project, Bali Restoring sustainable ocean habitats through community involvement and ecotourism
    • Coral Reef Restoration Project, Bali Restoring sustainable ocean habitats through community involvement and ecotourism
    • Coral Reef Restoration Project, Bali Restoring sustainable ocean habitats through community involvement and ecotourism
    • A low-tech fun solution supplying water to rural villages
    • A low-tech fun solution supplying water to rural villages
    • A low-tech fun solution supplying water to rural villages
    • A low-tech fun solution supplying water to rural villages
    • A low-tech fun solution supplying water to rural villages
    • Kaboom! Entrepreneur's Local Partnerships Help Kids Play
    • Corporate Citizenship and Intrapreneurship
    • "Each of us has a capacity to make business not only a source of economic wealth, but also a force for social and economic justice. Each of us needs to recognize and use the power we have to define the character of our enterprises, so they nurture values important to our society."
    • Interface Fifteen years after CEO Anderson’s call for change, Interface had: • Cut greenhouse gas emissions by 82% • Cut fossil fuel consumption by 60% • Cut waste by 66% • Cut water use by 75% • Invented and patented new machines, • materials, and manufacturing processes • Increased sales by 66%, doubled earnings, • And, raised profit margins!
    • Recology (formerly Norcal Waste Systems) http://www.recology.com/recology_home_movie.htm
    • The Triple-Bottom Line: People, Planet, and Profits With such clear traditional forms of measuring success through profit, how do we measure the impact of business on people and planet?
    • The Triple-Bottom Line: People, Planet, and Profits With such clear traditional forms of measuring success through profit, how do we measure the impact of business on people and planet?
    • How do social entrepreneurs develop community capital “beyond sustainability”?
    • What examples of social entrepreneurship have you read about or seen?
    • RESOURCES? www.TacticsofHope.org Give us your business card and we will send you the full Social Entrepreneurship Resource List
    • PART III: Implementing Community Engagement
    • Epignosis - higher level of knowledge from “knowing it” to “living it”
    • “For any organization whose  external environment is changing  faster than it is changing internally,  the end is in sight.  It is only a matter  of time.” ‐Jack Welch, Letter to GE Shareholders,  2001
    • What Is Community Engagement? “...the process of working collaboratively with groups of  people af@iliated by geographic proximity, special  interest, or similar situations...bringing about  environmental and behavioral changes...that help  mobilize resources and in@luence systems, change  relationships among partners, and serve as catalysts for  changing policies, programs, and practices.” – CDC Community Engagement Project
    • Ecology as Business Commercial Business: the activity of providing goods and services to a community • Ecology as Business: the earth’s activity of providing resources and environmental services to a community
    • Individuals Foundations
    • In 2008... •Individuals gave $230 billion Individuals Foundations •Foundations gave $45 billion 300 225 150 75 2008 0
    • In 2008... •Individuals gave $230 billion Individuals Foundations •Foundations gave $45 billion 300 225 150 75 2008 0 Of total foundation giving: 72% came from independent foundations 10% came from community foundations 10% came from corporate foundations 8% came from operating foundations.
    • In 2008... •Individuals gave $230 billion Individuals Foundations •Foundations gave $45 billion 300 225 150 75 2008 0 Of total foundation giving: 72% came from independent foundations 10% came from community foundations 10% came from corporate foundations 8% came from operating foundations.
    • Program-Based Investing • A planned series of future events, items, or performances • Producing the outcomes of change SEs seek • Creates capacity to develop social, human, and financial capital over an extended period of time
    • Internal and External Impacts
    • Internal and External Impacts • Human/Social Capital – stakeholder engagement at the core
    • Internal and External Impacts • Human/Social Capital – stakeholder engagement at the core • Local Support – Local support allows you to easily reach your market and adapt to the changing needs of your customers
    • Internal and External Impacts • Human/Social Capital – stakeholder engagement at the core • Local Support – Local support allows you to easily reach your market and adapt to the changing needs of your customers • Stable Customer Base and Brand Reputation – Socially responsible businesses gain trust and loyalty from their consumers
    • Internal and External Impacts • Human/Social Capital – stakeholder engagement at the core • Local Support – Local support allows you to easily reach your market and adapt to the changing needs of your customers • Stable Customer Base and Brand Reputation – Socially responsible businesses gain trust and loyalty from their consumers • Niche Markets – Environmental/Social businesses often tap into niche markets where unique opportunities to profit exist
    • Internal and External Impacts • Human/Social Capital – stakeholder engagement at the core • Local Support – Local support allows you to easily reach your market and adapt to the changing needs of your customers • Stable Customer Base and Brand Reputation – Socially responsible businesses gain trust and loyalty from their consumers • Niche Markets – Environmental/Social businesses often tap into niche markets where unique opportunities to profit exist • Savings from Efficiency Measures – Costs saving from efficient design, production, and distribution
    • Case Studies
    • Case Studies Steve Marriotti
    • Case Studies Steve Marriotti
    • Case Studies Steve Marriotti
    • Case Studies
    • Jasmine Lawrence
    • Jasmine Lawrence
    • Case Studies
    • Case Studies Rahfeal Gordon
    • Case Studies
    • Case Studies Zoe Damacela
    • Case Studies
    • Case Studies
    • Case Studies
    • What Will You Do? Just Starting? What community engagement ideas do you have? Already started? How has this presentation changed your thinking about your community engagement activity?
    • Wilford Welch, Author Wilford.Welch@attglobal.net Kene Turner, President EpiLife Consulting Kene@EpiLifeConsulting.com David Hopkins, Contributing Editor David.g.hopkins@gmail.com