Positive Conflict

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Turn unpleasant conflict into "Positive Conflict" and experience the benefits while reducing the harmful effects of conflict.

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Positive Conflict

  1. 1. Positive Conflict<br />[ Your event ]<br />[ Your location ]<br />by<br />David L. Hanson, Ph.D.<br />
  2. 2. Positive Conflict<br />Maximize the value of conflict <br />while reducing its harmful effects<br />
  3. 3. What is conflict?<br />
  4. 4. Common Responsesto the word “conflict”<br />Disagreement<br />Fighting<br />Hurt feelings<br />Arguing<br />Yelling<br />Hateful<br />Scary<br />Chaos<br />Defensive<br />Retaliation<br />Messy<br />Battle<br />Pettiness<br />. . . many more . . .<br />
  5. 5. Did you notice?<br />Not many “positive” responses, if any.<br />
  6. 6. Research finding:<br />Poorly managed employee conflict is responsible for about 65% of work performance problems.<br />( www.mediationworks.com )<br />
  7. 7. Question?<br />How many leaders understand their own “conflict management style” and would consider themselves a . . .<br />“Conflict Competent Leader”?<br />
  8. 8. Let’s try to be a funny . . .<br />Teamwork:<br />“Lots and lots of people doing exactly as I say!”<br />
  9. 9. Research finding:<br />Empirical research shows a negative association between relationship conflict, productivity, and satisfaction in teams.<br />(Evan, 1965; Gladstein, 1984; Wall and Nolan, 1986).<br />
  10. 10. Common solution:<br />Don’t alienate<br />unless<br />you can annihilate!<br />
  11. 11. Perhaps there’s a better way<br />
  12. 12. Perceived Choice<br />either fight<br />or<br />give in<br />
  13. 13. Perceived Choice<br />either fight<br />(disrespectful to the “other”)<br />or<br />give in<br />(disrespectful to “self”)<br />
  14. 14. Actual Choice<br />Neither fight<br />or<br />give in<br />
  15. 15. Actual Choice<br />Neither fight<br />Nor<br />give in<br />
  16. 16. THE POWER OF CHOICE<br />
  17. 17. Do you believe . . .<br />Humans are social creatures<br />“Unity” of the personality<br />Humans are empowered to choose<br />Not “nature vs. nurture” but the “creative human response”<br />If so, declare yourself to be an “Adlerian”<br /> ( www.alfredadler.org )<br />
  18. 18. Paths of Response to Conflict<br />
  19. 19. Conflict Response Categories<br />Destructive<br />
  20. 20. Conflict Response Categories<br />Destructive<br />Active<br />Passive<br />
  21. 21. Conflict Response Categories<br />Destructive<br />Active<br />Passive<br />
  22. 22. Conflict Response Categories<br />Destructive<br />Active<br />Passive<br />
  23. 23. Do I have another choice?<br />
  24. 24. Conflict Response Categories<br />Constructive<br />Destructive<br />Active<br />Passive<br />
  25. 25. Conflict Response Categories<br />Constructive<br />Destructive<br />Active<br />Passive<br />
  26. 26. Conflict Response Categories<br />Constructive<br />Destructive<br />Active<br />Passive<br />
  27. 27. Example of a “Response Category” Definition<br />“Perspective Taking”<br />
  28. 28. PERSPECTIVE TAKING<br />Putting yourself in the other person’s position and making a sincere effort to understand the other person’s point of view. This has the effect of increasing your knowledge base. There’s a good chance the other person will “feel understood.” This stance also opens you up to identification of the weakness of your own position. <br />Perspective taking requires your full and undivided attention using attentive listen techniques such as paraphrasing, reflection and exploration. <br />
  29. 29. Every “Response Category” has its own definition that is supported by research.<br />
  30. 30. What a great model!-----------------------Wouldn’t it be great if there were an assessment tool that measured these behaviors?<br />
  31. 31. Welcome to the<br />Conflict Dynamics Profile (CDP)<br />[ www.conflictdynamics.org/cdp ]<br />
  32. 32. Five Themes<br />Behavioral orientation<br />People can decide to change<br />Conflict is unfolding process<br />Early constructive responses<br />Group training works best<br />www.conflictdynamics.org<br />
  33. 33. “Hot Buttons”<br />
  34. 34. He’s got my number!<br />
  35. 35. CDP “HOT BUTTONS”People or situations which may irritate you enough to provoke conflict by producing destructive responses.<br />“Hot” and “Hotter”<br />Strong negative emotions<br />Impulsive responding<br />Feels “wired”<br />Feels as if “provoked”<br />www.conflictdynamics.org<br />
  36. 36. “HOT BUTTONS”<br />Unreliable<br />Overly Analytical<br />Unappreciative<br />Aloof<br />Micro-managing<br />Self-Centered<br />Abrasive<br />Untrustworthy<br />Hostile<br />
  37. 37. CDP Addresses Workplace Conflict<br />Isolates behaviors that inflame and resolve conflict<br />Provides resources for behavior change<br />Creates a “cultural shift” in norms of conduct<br />
  38. 38. CDP Assessment Profile<br />How one is provoked<br />How one responds<br />How one is viewed by self and others<br />Which behaviors are the most career damaging ones<br />
  39. 39. Sample of “Hot Button” Graphic<br />
  40. 40. 40<br />Sample CDP Graphic Scores<br />
  41. 41. Positive Conflict<br />Strategy for dealing with conflict<br />Improve individual and team performance<br />Reduce time dealing with prolonged conflict<br />Create “Conflict Competent Leaders”<br />Build a “win-win” conflict culture<br />
  42. 42. A Reasonable Goal<br />Because conflict is inevitable, successful conflict management reduces harmful effects and maximizes its useful ones.<br />
  43. 43. Thank You !<br />www.linkedin.com/in/DavidLHansonPhD<br />

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