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InterfaceFLOR Virtual Mill Tour

InterfaceFLOR Virtual Mill Tour

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  • This presentation will take us from Fiber to Backing in the construction of a quality modular product.
  • MANADATORY SLIDE
    AIA/CES requires top portion be in every presentation.
    “Attention Interior Designers” memo is mandated by the training team to remove all questions and confusion concerning how interior designers receive their continuing education credits.
  • Today we will be discussing the technologies that differentiate one modular product from another. It’s been over 30 years since the invention and installation of the first ever commercial carpet tile. Since that time, many innovations and technology improvements have led to reduced costs, increased styling options and higher quality.
    It is a process that has evolved over time and is drastically different from manufacturing broadloom and then cutting it into squares.
    Today we will cover a few of the critical differentiators of one modular product to another:
    Yarn Systems
    Face Construction
    Primary and Secondary Backing Construction
    Increasingly Sustainable Technologies
  • Introduction – Blossoming from Thread to Tile
    Brief description of the company and our global reach. The tour will focus on three key areas:
    Innovative technology used in the construction of Modular Carpet Tile
    Our definition of Sustainability is more than just products. It is witnessed in all of the 5 P’s: People, Process, Product, Place and Profit.
    Increasingly sustainable manufacturing techniques in materials and energy
  • Before we begin our tour, I want to go over some the carpet terminology that we will be using:
    Primary Backing - A component of tufted carpet consisting of woven or nonwoven fabric into which pile yarn tufts are inserted by the tufting needles. It is the carrier fabric for the pile yarn and should not be confused with secondary backing. Most primary backing is either woven or non-woven polypropylene or polyester.
    Secondary Backing - Reinforcement added to the back of tufted carpet. Theh term includes attached cushion and other polymeric coatings.
    Cut Pile - A carpet pile texture in which the face is composed of cut ends of pile yarn.
    Tufted Loop - Carpet style possessing a pile surface consisting of uncut loops. May be woven or tufted. Loops may be the same of different heights.
    Pile Height - The visible wear surface of carpet consisting of yarn tufts in loop and/or cut configuration. Also called the carpet's "face" or "nap."
    Gauge - The measurement of the distance between the tufting needles per inch across the width of the carpet. For example, 1/10th gauge carpet means there are 10 needles per inch across the width of the carpet. The closer the spacing between tufting needles, the better the carpet performance.
    Stitch rate - distance between tufts along the length of the carpet.
  • Yarn Preparation – The right product, for the right customer, at the right time
    Since our average order size is less than 500 yards, we often need to size down the large 10 pound cones we get from our suppliers onto smaller cones in amount and color combination we need for particular order.
    We use either Nylon or PLA to construct the face of our products.
  • The color (pigment) is added directly to the polymer and the yarn is extruded as colored yarn. Because the pigment is locked into the polymer, solution dyed fibers offer superior color fastness to light, atmospheric contaminants and harsh chemical. Very large dye lot sizes can be made. In DuPont’s case, this can be millions of pounds.
    The fiber is then extruded in colors.
    Solution dyed yarn comes to our distributors in single colors and is then either air-entangled to produce “heathered” yarns or twisted and heat-set to form “piled” or “barber poled” yarns.
  • Interface also uses a small percentage of Yarn Dyed – Space dyed materials. It only makes up a very small percentage of the material we use. Below 5% overall. The advantages are a bright “pop” of color randomly inserted throughout the product. The disadvantage is that it can bleach out and does not maintain it’s color as well as Solution Dyed fibers.
    The process has white yarn running along a conveyor belt and color is shot down onto the yarn in sequence, giving 6 different colors in a repeating rainbow effect. It uses very little water for a yarn dye process.
  • Yarn dye methods offer some greater styling flexibility than solution dyed but do not provide the same level of color fastness to light and harsh cleaning chemicals.
    In the Skein dye process, yarn is wound onto large skeins and then put onto a dyeing rack. These racks hold the yarn during the dyeing process.
    In the dye bath, dye is circulated through the yarn. This process can last more than 4 hours. Water is heated to high temperatures for a sustained period of time allowing the dyes, PH balancing chemicals and enzymes to fully react with each other and the yarn. It is highly energy intensive. Think about how much energy it takes to boil water on your stove. Now imagine heating 5,000 gallons for 4 hours!!!
    Once that process is done, they then flush out the water!!!! 5,000 gallons of water wasted with chemicals added.
    After dyeing, the excess water is removed from the skeins by placing them first into a centrifuge and then into a drying oven. Again another significant use of energy and resources.
    The skeins are then wound onto cones and are now ready for tufting.
  • Printing is another option in commercial carpet. It is another technology that Interface has abandoned on our way to achieving sustainability for it’s lack of performance and it’s consumption of natural resources.
  • To injection print carpet, it takes about 50 gallons of water per square yard, as opposed to solution which uses approximately .9 gallons of water per square yard.
  • Face construction – The “fuzzy side”
    We place the yarn onto devices known as Portable Creels in the exact placement, color and amount we need for a customers order.
    Once the yarn fed to the machine, science and art combine to give us thousands of different color and pattern combinations.
    We tuft the yarn into a non-woven primary backing.
  • This machine is know as an “Infinity” machine. These are the machines that run approximately 85% of our volume at this time. All of our Integrated Patterned Products occur on machines like this. These 12th gauge machines are computer controlled and can create numerous pile heights within one product giving the customers seeming limitless effects.
  • Loops are created via high speed coordination between the loopers, the needles on a tufting machine and the patterning devices on a tufting machine. The yarn is fed to the needle in different amounts to create pattern on the face of the carpet. Once the loop has been made, the looper holds the yarn in place.
  • Before we had computer controls, we had pattern slats. It works similar to a player piano. Where there is a cut-out, you get a high loop. Where there is no cut out you get a low loop. These machines generate about 5% of our volume.
  • We tuft all of our IFS products into a non-woven primary backing. It is far more dimensionally stable then woven polypropelene backings that are in many broadloom products and carpet tiles manufactured by broadloom companies.
  • Protection
    Imbedded at the primary backing is our Anti-microbial Intersept
    It is biodegradable, contains no heavy metals and has the toxicity of common table salt.
  • Intersept – This video is a 72 hour time lapse showing how are carpet performs when challenged by fungus. The sample on the left has Intersept imbedded and the sample on the right is a competitive sample without an antimicrobial.
  • On the surface, we place our topical treatment, Protect2 with Duratech to prevent soiling and staining.
  • Backing construction – Secondary backing
    It was patented in 1974. These tiles contain a minimum of 39% Post-Industrial recycled content.
  • We love GlasBac, but it can:
    Only run on virgin Vinyl
    Runs off of non-renewable energy
    We can only achieve about 40% Post-Industrial recycled content
  • Backing technologies of the future
    Carpet reclamation – ReEntry
    Interface has diverted over 80,000,000 pounds of carpet from landfills since 1996.
  • Agglomeration
    We then separate and palletize the various plastics into a form that can be used in new backings. Currently we are only using Post-Consumer and Post-Industrial carpet tile as feed stock for Cool Blue.
  • Here we are showing some additional pictures of how we reclaim carpet tiles from our customers floors and then process the material into a form that can be reused in carpet tiles.
  • Cool Blue
    This equipment can run off of various waste streams and is powered by 100% green energy supplied by a local landfill.
  • Here we show how the machine is powered by 100% green energy from the local LaGrange landfill and then Cool Blue takes it from Pellet to Sheet to finished carpet tile backing.
  • Cutting and boxing - Tiles are ready to ship
    Interface makes more carpet than anyone else in the world. This line cuts more than 12,000,000 yards of carpet per year.
  • In Conclusion, we hope you enjoyed:
    Virtual Mill Tour of Interface
    Face Construction
    Backing Construction
    Increasingly Sustainable Technologies
  • In the future, it is important to:
    Judge companies by what they do.
    Not what they say.
    Remember:
    The smallest deeds are better,
    than the biggest intentions.
    - Fortune Cookie, March ‘06
  • Transcript

    • 1. Planting The Seeds: David Gerson Director of Customer Relations Interface Flooring Systems Cell – 404-259-4715 The following presentation is registered with the AIA/CES for continuing professional education. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by the AIA of any material of construction or any method or manner of handling, using, distributing, or dealing in any material or product. Questions related to specific materials, methods, and services will be addressed at the conclusion of this presentation. Inside Interface.
    • 2. Interface, Inc. is a Registered Provider with the American Institute of Architects Continuing Education Systems. Credit earned on completion of this program will be reported to CES Records for AIA Members. Certificates of Completion for non-AIA members are available on request. ATTENTION INTERIOR DESIGNERS: You are individually responsible for submitting to your member organization:  Appropriate forms  Fees
    • 3. •Virtual Mill Tour •Face Construction •Backing Construction •Increasingly Sustainable Technologies Inside Interface.
    • 4. Blossoming from Thread to Tile: Interface Factory Tour.
    • 5. Modular Carpet Construction: Terms. Primary Backing Secondary Backing Cut Pile Tufted Loop Pile Height Gauge Stitch rate
    • 6. Blossoming from Thread to Tile: Yarn Preparation.
    • 7. < 1.5 MR2.5 MR > 4.7 MR x y modification ratio = Modification Ratio
    • 8. ANTRON® NYLON 479M foot traffics 705M foot traffics0 foot traffics TRILOBAL FILAMENT TRILOBAL FILAMENT before HWE after HWE before HWE after HWE Wear Test Results
    • 9. Solution Dyed Face Construction: Dyeing Method. Pigment is added directly to the polymer. Yarn is extruded in colors. Similarto a carrot, coloris inherent to the yarn.
    • 10. arn Dyed – Space Dyed. Adds a Multi-color‘Pop’ in Products. Randomness of Coloris Good forHiding Soil. Face Construction: Dyeing Method.
    • 11. arn Dyed – Skein Dyed. ace Construction: yeing Methods We Don’t Use.
    • 12. ece Dyed – Printing “Injection.” ace Construction: yeing Methods We Don’t Use.
    • 13. Piece Dyed Printing 50 Gallons of Water/Yard. Solution Dyed 1 Gallon of Water/Yard.
    • 14. Blossoming from Thread to Tile: Tufting Technology
    • 15. Tufting Technology: Infinity.
    • 16. needle yarn backing cloth looper needle yarn backing cloth looper Tufting Technology: Loop Pile
    • 17. Tufting Technology: Pattern Slats.
    • 18. Tufting Technology: Primary Backing. Before Heat Non-Woven Woven AfterHeat Non-Woven Woven
    • 19. Blossoming from Thread to Tile: Protection
    • 20. Protective Treatments: Antimicrobial. rsept is imbedded into the ‘Primary Backing.’
    • 21. Blossoming from Thread to Tile: R-Coning
    • 22. Blossoming from Thread to Tile: Secondary Backing
    • 23. Blossoming from Thread to Tile: Branching Out Further: ReEntry.
    • 24. Blossoming from Thread to Tile: Branching Out Further: Agglomeration.
    • 25. ReEntry and Agglomeration
    • 26. Blossoming from Thread to Tile: Branching Out Further: Cool Blue
    • 27. Cool Blue
    • 28. Blossoming from Thread to Tile: Cutting
    • 29. •Virtual Mill Tour of Interface •Face Construction •Backing Construction •Increasingly Sustainable Technologies Conclusion.
    • 30. Judge companies by what they do. Not what they say. The smallest deeds are better, than the biggest intentions. - Fortune Cookie, March ‘06 Words to live by…
    • 31. David Gerson Director of Customer Relations Interface Flooring Systems Cell – 404-259-4715 The preceding presentation is registered with the AIA/CES for continuing professional education. As such, it did not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by the AIA of any material of construction or any method or manner of handling, using, distributing, or dealing in any material or product. Questions related to specific materials, methods, and services will be addressed at the conclusion of this presentation. Thank you!