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Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
Social Media - So what?
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Social Media - So what?

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This is a recent presentation to a Hudson Recruitment Client Breakfast. It talks about the latest trends in Digital Communications. Focus was on sharing VicRoads journey so far and other B2B …

This is a recent presentation to a Hudson Recruitment Client Breakfast. It talks about the latest trends in Digital Communications. Focus was on sharing VicRoads journey so far and other B2B applications for Social Media.

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  • Thanks very much for this opportunity to chat today. I don’t think there is a conference in Melbourne right now that does not touch on the topic of social media. You can’t help but get caught up with the hype, radio and TV are using it for instant information, celebrities are using it, politicians are using and listening to it. One thing is for sure, it’s changing the way we think about our business, the communications and our conversations. At it’s best, it is a fantastic way to get involved in a conversation, at it’s worst, it’s boring talk about nothing.
  • A wave of technological change I see a wave of technological change coming over the next two years: Probably nothing like it since the dot com boom in the late 1990’s. Remember when Hotmail, Ebay, Amazon, Seek, Carsales and Realestate.com.au changed forever the way we researched and purchased. In this new wave, you’ll see these advancements occur on three fronts: Social media Mobility Applications and Content Underlying all this change is the massive increases in access to digital content which I will talk about in just a moment Interestingly, they will all develop and merge together to make some very interesting, and often unpredictable developments. Social Media: The last couple of years have seen social media become the number one activity on the web. In essence though, it’s just an extension of human communication, sharing, word of mouth, crowds etc. There are some amazing stats that have been doing the rounds since last year, I heard that on average, 1/3 of our leisure time is estimated to be spent online. That used to mean sitting in front of the computer, but now often means sitting with your Smartphone or even your TV. As marketers trying to reach an audience, it’s a fair assumption that the largest number of people is almost certainly online. Collectively we’re all spending seven hours a month on Facebook, 77 percent of us read blogs, and YouTube has over 100 million unique visitors a month and growing. Twitter turned 5 in March, To mark the occasion, let’s take a look at Twitter by the #numbers: It took 3 years, 2 months and 1 day to hit 1 billion Tweets. Now it only takes 1 week for Twitter to syndicate 1 billion Tweets – although most of them lately will probably include mentions of Charlie Sheen, Rebecca Black, or Justin Bieber In February 2011, daily Tweets averaged 140 million (140 FTW) almost 3x the 50 million Tweets sent every day this time last year. On March 11th in the wake of Japan’s devastating earthquake and tsunami, Tweets flew to 177 million. On New Year’ Day 2011, 4 seconds after passing midnight in Japan, a new Tweets Per Second (TPS) record was set at 6,939. While the exact number of users is elusive, Twitter reports that 572,000 accounts were created on March 12, 2011. 460,000 new accounts were created each day on average in February 2011. Mobile use of Twitter is booming, growing 182% in the last year. Ashton Kutcher / Ellen Degeneres have more twitter followers than the population of Ireland, Norway and Panama If Facebook was a country, it would be the 4 th largest in population in the world Content is becoming deeper, richer and far more targeted. And consumers are playing a bigger role than ever. User generated content from photos, videos, reviews, just think of the recent natural disasters here and overseas. Much of the footage we saw on the news was from individuals using social media tools Video will take off Applications will be available for nearly every think you ever need. Using technologies like near field communications that allow you to scan and buy using a digital device like mobile phone or tablet
  • A wave of social change Interestingly, they will all develop and merge together to make some very interesting, and often unpredictable developments. ComputerWorld reported in their Apple Holic Blog in January that for the last 91 days of 2011, Apple sold 16.24 million iPods, that is 2 iPods per second. That means there were more iPods' sold last year than cars in the world. When you think that there are four babies born each second in the world, that’s an iPhone for every second baby born. At the recent ad-tech2011 conference in Melbourne, Microsoft Asia Pacific CMO said that ½ the users of the internet will be located in the Asia Pacific region Generation Y now outnumber Baby Boomers, a little scary. Interestingly 90% of them trust recommendations and only 14% of them trust advertising.
  • Social Media has become the Number One activity on the web. We all know that social media isn’t going away . And that we need to use it. Somehow. In some way. To some extent. But that’s where we all get caught up, how much should we be using social media given all our other marketing efforts? Without doubt someone is out there talking about your brand, your service levels and your products, the challenge is to be far more involved with these discussions than we traditionally were with our regular advertising. As a business we need to monitor, react and respond. Social media is not a short term strategy, it needs to become a long term engagement. Marketers have had mixed fortunes when it comes to tapping into social media, they try to engage with brand ambassadors and embrace user generated content, you can gather quite a following, but you don’t have completed control. You can guide the followers, but once you overstep the mark, try to take control, you risk damaging your brand. One example is Vegemite, they had an amazing level of interest and engagement when they launched the contest to name their new product extension. There was mixed reaction to the new product, but there certainly was a lot of passion and engagement. There were Facebook groups created to promote and discuss names for the black stuff and cream cheese in a jar! Nearly 50,000 names were submitted to the Vegemite website. Vegemite had successfully engaged an enormously loyal fan base. But then, Vegemite made a major misstep when at half time in the AFL Grand Final, it announced it would name the product iSnack 2.0. It did this without going back to the audience of fans it had built and asking them, whilst it was one of the suggested names, it chose to pick the name rather than return to the fans for their opinion. Fans were up in arms, and they again used social media like Facebook and Twitter to voice their anger. The lesson for Vegemite is that you can’t just try to tap into social media when it suits, it has to be that long term engagement I mentioned. There are numerous examples of marketers attempting to build awareness through clever campaigns and events, but most go cold as soon as the campaign is over. On the positive side, you might have heard of Tiger Woods! Before the little blow up last year he was better known as a golfer, and many of you would have seen the EA Sports game, Tiger Woods 09. In response to a glitch that was posted on YouTube and other social media sites, EA quickly created a response, their response has been viewed nearly 5 million times on YouTube alone.
  • I’d like you to understand that Social Media is just another evolving step in the evolution of media and communication. We had the mail, we had radio and TV, we’ve had the telephone, we had mobiles, we had faxes, we had email, SMS alerts It’s now people who are in control of what they say and what they read. I’d like to think of Social Media in terms of your own personal newspaper. You are in control, you are the editor and the publisher. You get the chance to choose what content you see and form whom it comes from. Imagine if your daily breakfast newspaper contained only news of your football team, your town, your drive to work, your office, your project your favourite celebrities and nothing about Collingwood or politics! You can also publish your own thoughts and images, engage with people you know and have similar interests and allow others to share their thoughts and opinions that might be about YOU
  • So what is Social Media It’s nothing more than a collection of tools and online spaces that assist individuals and business to accelerate their information and communication needs. Part of the challenge is knowing which tool to use for what purpose. allows data, information & knowledge to flow real-time between individuals, employees, or customers A new way of speaking and a new way of listening A way to reach people when it suits them, they are in control A way to reach a larger audience than traditional methods of communication
  • Mobility: the launch and uptake of new mobile devices is making the web and anytime, anywhere proposition: Mobile 65.8 million people in the U.S. own Smartphone's (all stats from comScore ) Thirty-seven percent browse the web Thirty-five percent download apps Twenty-five percent visit social networking sites or blogs Sixteen percent listen to music As I mentioned, there have been about 10 years of predictions that mobile internet would explode, I am sure you will agree that it has finally exploded around the world. Who here has an iphone? The early part of the change was to replicate traditional offline and online models on mobile, often in simplified, easy to use applications. Mobile Internet has exploded over the last two years. It is now considered to be very much mainstream, as I said, 1 billion people will access the net for the first time in the next couple of years and that access will be via a mobile Probably the most obvious change has been the device itself. Certainly the iPhone has changed the way we think about accessing information on the go. Quickly other manufacturers Smartphones are arriving, each one with new features and improvements. We have seen the introduction of e-readers, although these are not as obvious in the Australian market. Like Skiff (pictured) and Kindle have entered the market. Amazon advised that, on Xmas Day 2009 last year they sold more e-books than print for the first time. Tablets We are seeing a raft of new touch screen tablets being released onto the market, with the big one – Apple’s ipad 2 was recently released. What are people doing on these, There are some stats on usage of Smartphone's, they highlight the fact that it is not really a phone any more.
  • We now have devices for almost every occasion and they’re all internet-enabled. From large screen TVs to tiny mobile phones. The iphone has stimulated the imagination about what we can do on a phone. Tigerspike said at the recent Ad:Tech conference that in their experience, apps for Smartphone's have 10 times the engagement of a traditional mobile website. Users have become accustomed to looking in the app store rather than search for a mobile website that could probably do the same job. There are 250 million credit cards linked to itunes around the world with most purchases being around $1. With nearly 1.5 million iPhones in Australia, the whole usage of a mobile device has changed. There’s a lot less talk and messaging on the phones, and a lot more browsing and engagement. What’s next? Web enabled accessories like glasses? Perhaps a windscreen of your car that provides information projected about your journey. Whatever comes next, it’s a long way from the start of the century when you carried around your palm pilot, and your mobile phone, and your laptop and a series of cables required to connect them together and to go online!
  • This is a slide from Morgan Stanley, and it shows how quickly mobile internet is ramping up compared to some of the other waves of digital access Mobility: the launch and uptake of new mobile devices is making the web and anytime, anywhere proposition: In the next few years, a billion people will access digital content for the first time and it will be on a phone.
  • This estimate from Morgan Stanley shows that some time in 2013, the number of Mobile Internet users will overtake desktop users. If you are not thinking about mobile and how you reach your users, you are planning not to be successful.
  • I’d like you to think of this evolution from Web 1.0 This blackboard message is the same as the first generation of websites and emails. You get a website (or maybe a newspaper) You place some information and you WAIT – you wait for them to come and find out. You might even pay someone to get people to see your message Your message is fixed, people can’t comment, it’s very inflexible. This was useful and we flocked to the internet in our millions, but it’s pretty dry
  • Web 2.0 The new web allows us to share, consume, respond, when it suits up, using the tools we like to use. We all remember someone sending us some photos from their holiday, we opened the email, looked at the photos and after a while wished they would not send any more emails that clogged up our inbox. With the web you get to choose what you see, it might be as a friend on Facebook, or a follower on Twitter. On the other hand you can put information out in the internet with sites like Facebook or twitter for people to see, they see it when they want to, and if they like it, they will share it further and so it goes. Engagement, Interaction, User Generated
  • There are some common myths associated with Social Media, one of the first is the way so many people I speak to, screw their face up at the words social media. Mention giving access to Twitter to your staff or Facebook, and instantly people think, more time wasting! 84% of FB users check in at least once a week, and 68% check at least once per day 64% of Twitter users check at least once a day, 48% check Twitter several times per day – 5% follow a company on Twitter
  • Previously old fashioned, authoritarian view toward customers Users obliged to do business with us Communication done unconsciously, reactively, and by rote
  • How do people communicate? What do they want from us? How do they want us to tell them?
  • Around two years ago, with the arrival of the graduated licence, it kicked in Ads were being placed in newspapers. Why? Audience was 16-18 yr olds primarily. Not traditionally newspaper-readers Something needed to change
  • Now we had a case for change. Clip won many awards New direction for targeting key audiences With agency JWT, produced iPhone app CityGT Internal workshops to educate staff Social media is the way forward
  • Hoddle Street study: so far so good In April 2010 the Hoddle Street online forum was launched as part of a broader consultation and engagement strategy. The online forum has been a key part in understanding concerns, ideas and what’s important to residents, businesses and users of Hoddle Street. 6,129 visitors posting 1,859 comments. The community’s key themes included: Connectivity – communities, services, businesses and recreational areas. Train stations – improved safety and connectivity. Liveability – reducing traffic on local streets. Pedestrians – safer facilities for crossing Hoddle Street. Buses – improved priority access. Cyclists – improved crossing times, dedicated bike lanes and local bike paths. Trams – priority and separation from cars. Traffic movements – reduced congestion and improved traffic flows. A critical part of understanding the results of an online engagement process is to acknowledge that success is often measured by the amount of users getting the information they need and choosing not to participate further. The online forum results will help our planners and engineers understand the social impacts as they develop options for an integrated and sustainable solution for the future of Hoddle Street. Use of forums, FAQ’s, Key documents, polls Maybe a comment on the latest Australia Scan data on community consultation.
  • The beauty of social media sites is they are easy to use, cheap to set up and can allow you to reach a large number of users. You can push timely information to your Twitter Page. This is not much different though to putting the information on a static website.
  • Where it gets interesting though is that your information is often mixed in with others information
  • YouTube 112,764,000 unique viewers in January ( Nielsen ) The average user spends 15 – 25 minutes each day on YouTube ( Mashable ) Globally, YouTube has 490 million unique users ( Mashable )
  • Know who you want to talk about, is it 18 year old new drivers, or is it people who do not have English as a first language? Fish where the fishes are, find the places where conversations are going on. For VicRoads it can be on Facebook, it might be car forums. There is a lot of conversations going on in places like Just commodores or 4WD forums Engage, one of the keys to successfully get your social media activity off the ground is to engage in the conversation, whilst it can be daunting at first, it is important to jump in and have a conversation. Follow, it’s no good tweeting if nobody is listening. One way to kick off the conversation is to follow others in similar industries, for us it’s the emergency services, it’s the local councils and the media. If you can encourage them to follow you back, you can start to build your audience. Trust [your staff]: one person can’t engage with the social media universe on behalf of an organisation by themselves. We trust all manner of public servants to engage with the public every day, over counters and over the phone. We can trust them on social media too. Share: collaborate not just communicate. Social media isn’t always about broadcasting, although it does have a role Understand your risks,
  • to note that none of those issues are exclusive to social media or online engagement, and they are (along with many other potential cases of misconduct via social media) covered by existing guidelines. Hudson allow a 30 minute window for access to YouTube The government has allowed open access Other corporate employers block it completely \\ Mis
  • Some stats from www.ExactTarget.com.au/sff 73% of US online consumers have created a Facebook account 17% of US online consumers have created a Twitter account 42 of Facebook users have liked at least one company Many people like an organisation in order to receive discounts and promotions. Companies face a challenge in what to do, some consumers want to be entertained whilst others just want discounts and benefits Like can be seen in many ways, Liking sends a message to your friends about you, it doesn’t necessarily mean you are asking to be marketed at. Fans are fickle Reading too much into a like is a bit like discussing a marriage on the first date So how are some people using it, Recruitment use it to create awareness of roles, and users follow to become aware of roles.
  • Dell’s B2B Facebook Initiatives including Dell for Business and Social Media for Business Pages Advice for B2B companies getting started on Facebook How to handle attacks on Facebook by bringing customer service people into the process, whether you work for a large or small organization
  • The company recently created the Gatorade Mission Control Center inside of its Chicago headquarters, a room that sits in the middle of the marketing department and could best be thought of as a war room for monitoring the brand in real-time across social media. Mission Control The room features six big monitors with five seats for Gatorade’s marketing team to track a number of data visualizations and dashboards –- also available on to employees on their desktops — that the company has custom built with partners including Radian6 and IBM. Below are a few of the visualizations that we got to check out in an interview last week: They have 4 full time staff and 3 agency teams supporting this effort
  • Do “listen in” and “contribute” to the conversations occurring on various platforms. The key message was that as a business, you should be monitoring, reacting and responding. Don’t see social media as a short term strategy or fad. The clear message at ad:tech was that it needs to become an ongoing form of engagement. Marketers have had mixed fortunes when it comes to tapping into social media, they frequently try to engage with brand ambassadors and embrace user generated content. There were numerous examples of businesses that were able to gather a following through clever campaigns and events, but only to let them go as soon as the campaign was over. Remind yourself that you don’t have complete control. You can guide the followers, but once you overstep the mark and try to take control, you risk damaging your brand.
  • Applications and Content There’s been a change in the mobile ecosystem. If you purchased a phone a couple of years ago, it’s likely the telco provided you with a series of links to limited functionality mobile sites and specific content you could access. It was all fairly basic, and most users didn’t explore much further than these portals. Then along came the iphone, and the appstore Apple tidied up the challenge of finding the right content for your mobile experience. As Apple’s own advertising says, there is an app for almost everything. Apps allow marketers to associate their brand and products with useful tools to help consumers. Consumers love applications that let them manage, optimise and improve their lives. Apps come in many different categories. they provide basic services to the user, but allow marketers to associate positive experiences about their brand and service, Apps fit into a number of different categories. Whilst Apps that generally mirror the services and content on your website are seen as okay, there is great value in associating your brand with something very useful. Something that makes life easy for a consumer and has a positive rub off on your brand, some examples of these apps are. Like where users can find you, most banks have simple applications to find the nearest ATM or Branch. The AA in Britain has an app that is designed to make your travel around the countryside enjoyable, pointing out restaurants, hotels and attractions. There are apps that put you in the know – Pizza tracker, Taxi Trackers, Gig Finder, They save you money – Ikea in France have an application where you can arrange car sharing to get to their stores! It’s got nothing to do with furniture Allow you to find stuff, that is timely, relevant and valuable, my favourite is the SitOrSquat app from a toilet paper manufacturer, it helps users find toilets, change tables, users can interact with the app to provide feedback. Surf and Snow report apps Keep the user healthy, happy and fit – Map my run, the Brazillian Nivea Sun App, Tools and amenities – Japanese example of axe deodorant and the alarm clock.
  • Building on what we’ve learnt Traffic app, see cameras, plug in route and plan around accidents Clearways app to help customers and reduce congestion Customer service functionality on Facebook Building a bike app Emergency map app Modernising and refocusing existing clips Driving transactions online to reduce strain on CSCs
  • Yammer: Yammer is a social media tool like Twitter but only people on the same email domain as you can see what you send. It’s like an internal Twitter account. There are other similar tools – Microsoft’s SharePoint has one you can pay for (basic Yammer is free). These provide a safe environment in which people can experiment with social media without some of the risks of the mainstream varieties. It can be a good place to start. Educate: social media is a new skill. Not everyone knows what to do yet. Help others. Share ideas. Ask questions. There aren’t that many experts in this field and there’s nothing to feel overawed about. Some simple steps (the four ‘Rs’): register (get a log on to Twitter or Facebook or both), read (statistics suggest that for every one person who writes a blog post, 10 people comment  and 100 read it – just reading social media on line is a good start), retweet (retweeting is just like repeating a joke you heard from someone else – something most of us do every day), finally – really get stuck in, you’ll be surprised how easy it is.
  • The point being that technology has only just begun tinkering with the way people live their lives and businesses operate. We’re not at the end of anything. Not even in the middle. We’re still just at the beginning. We have an opportunity – the people in this room and our peers – to totally re-write the marketing rule book. But we need to lift our sights. Thank you
  • Transcript

    • 1. Social Media – “so what?” David Egan – Manager, Web Services and Online Engagement April 14 2011
    • 2. social media apps &content mobility a wave of technological change
    • 3. a wave of social change ComputerWorld – Jan 19 2011 – Apple Holic Blog
    • 4. social media… “ there are very public conversations going on out there, you can listen in, engage and amplify”
    • 5. Social Media – so what? <ul><li>It’s just another step in the evolution of media and communication between people </li></ul><ul><li>It’s people who are in control, of what they say and what they read </li></ul>
    • 6. What is Social Media? <ul><li>A collection of tools and online spaces that assist individuals and business to accelerate their information and communication needs. </li></ul><ul><li>allows data, information & knowledge to flow real-time between individuals </li></ul><ul><li>A new way of speaking and a new way of listening </li></ul><ul><li>A way to reach people when it suits them </li></ul><ul><li>A way to reach a larger audience than traditional methods of communication </li></ul>
    • 7. mobility… “ making the web an anytime, anywhere proposition”
    • 8. … are all web-enabled” Devices for almost every occasion…
    • 9.  
    • 10.  
    • 11. Web 1.0 M80 upgrade works this weekend
    • 12. Web 2.0 <ul><li>You speak, people choose to follow, they share with others </li></ul>
    • 13. The numbers <ul><li>It’s just for kids? Right? </li></ul><ul><li>More than 25% of Twitter users are 35-44, trailed by the 45-54 group at less than 20% (65% of all users are over the age of 35 with less than 20% representing the 24 and under age groups) </li></ul><ul><li>25% of Facebook users are 45-54 with the 35-44 group at just 20% (61% are 35 or older) </li></ul>http://blog.tribalytic.com/how-many-australian-twitter-users-are-there-and-where-are-they-from/
    • 14. The Journey for VicRoads <ul><li>Naive understanding of digital </li></ul><ul><li>Experimenting </li></ul><ul><li>Developing a platform </li></ul><ul><li>Expansion </li></ul><ul><li>Refocus </li></ul><ul><li>Putting consumers at the centre </li></ul>
    • 15. Why move into digital space? <ul><li>Moving from an old-fashioned view of consumers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Authoritarian </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consumers obliged to do business with us </li></ul></ul>
    • 16. We thought… <ul><li>How do our consumers communicate? </li></ul><ul><li>How do they want us to communicate with them? </li></ul>
    • 17. Direct Route to Licence Town http://www.youtube.com/vicroads
    • 18. The result… <ul><li>Social media strategy </li></ul><ul><li>Use of digital and social media now a priority </li></ul>
    • 19. Community consultation
    • 20. Real Time information, when it’s needed <ul><li>Twitter Feeds </li></ul>
    • 21. More than just putting it on a page
    • 22. Distribution
    • 23. Video
    • 24. Facebook <ul><li>Page dedicated to customer service questions </li></ul><ul><li>Licence and registration questions </li></ul><ul><li>Public so more people see them than just one </li></ul><ul><li>Can save repetitive asking of the same question </li></ul>
    • 25. What’s in a Social Media Strategy? <ul><li>Know where your audience is? </li></ul><ul><li>Engage </li></ul><ul><li>Follow others </li></ul><ul><li>Resourcing – trust your staff </li></ul><ul><li>Educate </li></ul><ul><li>Risks </li></ul><ul><li>Is it internal or external </li></ul>
    • 26. Common concerns <ul><li>Staff using the applications for personal use </li></ul><ul><li>Employee misconduct </li></ul><ul><li>Disclosure of sensitive information </li></ul><ul><li>Misrepresentation of the business </li></ul><ul><li>Misuse of resources </li></ul><ul><li>Bringing organisation into disrepute </li></ul>
    • 27. How can it be used for a your business? <ul><li>Initial consultation with the community / customers? </li></ul><ul><li>Ongoing community / customer engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Ongoing communication </li></ul><ul><li>Building relationships with the community / customers / within the organisation </li></ul><ul><li>Celebrating success </li></ul><ul><li>Reaching culturally and language diverse groups </li></ul><ul><li>Listening to the community/customers, engaging with them </li></ul><ul><li>All these activities are in conjunction with traditional methods of communications </li></ul>
    • 28. How do business use it?
    • 29. <ul><li>Create original content and share it openly </li></ul><ul><li>Share others’ original content </li></ul><ul><li>Provide real time information from the coalface </li></ul><ul><li>Follow conversations specific to your business </li></ul>How do B2B organisations use it?
    • 30. The challenge to resource
    • 31. Listen to what they are saying <ul><li>Do listen in and contribute </li></ul><ul><li>You should be monitoring, reacting and responding </li></ul><ul><li>Social Media is not a fad or short term strategy </li></ul><ul><li>Social media is an ongoing form of engagement </li></ul><ul><li>You don’t have complete control, you can guide them, but if you overstep the mark and try to take control, you risk damaging your brand </li></ul>
    • 32. apps & content… “ apps have made the web useful, Apple tidied it up and now that model is being copied by all manufacturers”
    • 33. VicRoads first steps <ul><li>LiveDrive </li></ul><ul><li>Clearways and Parking app </li></ul>
    • 34. How to use it internally <ul><li>Yammer / SharePoint internal conversations </li></ul><ul><li>Educate, it’s new, so help, share and ask questions </li></ul><ul><li>Experiment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sign up </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Read, comment and share, retweet </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have some fun </li></ul></ul>
    • 35. Thoughts and questions? <ul><li>David Egan </li></ul><ul><li>Manager, Web Services and Online Engagement </li></ul><ul><li>VicRoads </li></ul><ul><li>E [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>L au.linkedin.com/in/davideegan </li></ul><ul><li>T @degan1970 </li></ul>

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