HF RFID - Market Research

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For over a decade, most RFID has been practised at High Frequency (13.56MHz). Last year, 50% of the global RFID market value was HF, expenditure on tags and systems at that frequency being ten times the amount spent on RFID at any other frequency. Its dominance was been retained as RFID entered a phase of rapid growth in the last two years mainly because of huge orders such as the $6 billion China national ID card scheme, the e-passport, now issued by over 70 countries, and financial cards such as the MasterCard Paypass. Gas cylinders and marathon runners previously tagged at LF are now tagged at HF.

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HF RFID - Market Research

  1. 1. HF RFID The Great Leap Forward The most important RFID frequency HF is by far the most important frequency for RFID in value of market. This position will be strengthened in the next few years by dramatic improvements in HF RFID technology such as replacing the silicon chip with printed transistors, leading to 90% reduction in tag cost, new signalling techniques that improve many parameters, elimination of inlays and many other advances. This will make it a much stronger contender in supply chains and asset management. In addition, the standards for many exciting new markets for passive RFID, from RFID enabled phones to financial cards, national ID cards, passports and tickets are at HF and the new smart active labels will also be mainly at HF. Many applications typically met with LF RFID such as secure access and tagging metallic items are moving to HF. As a result, the global market for HF RFID will triple from $2.9 billion in 2008 to $8.6 billion in 2018, remaining a larger and more lucrative business than UHF passive RFID, the number two. This report analyses this great leap forward. For over a decade, most RFID has been practised at High Frequency (13.56MHz). Last year, 50% of the global RFID market value was HF, expenditure on tags and systems at that frequency being ten times the amount spent on RFID at any other frequency. Its dominance was been retained as RFID entered a phase of rapid growth in the last two years mainly because of huge orders such as the $6 billion China national ID card scheme, the e-passport, now issued by over 70 countries, and financial cards such as the MasterCard Paypass. Gas cylinders and marathon runners previously tagged at LF are now tagged at HF. After the huge orders we now see the huge improvements in performance. HF RFID is taking a great leap forward. Improvements of 50% to several hundred percent in range, tag cost, tag size, multi-tag reading, reader power, tolerance of environmental and electrical interference and more will be seen in mainstream applications, thanks to the breakthroughs of ten or so companies, most of them little publicised. For example, Kovio will print silicon nanoparticles into the few thousand transistors of a typical ISO 14443 tag at one tenth of the cost of the silicon chip. Cambridge Resonant Technologies offers 50% more range to one tenth of the reader power and smaller tags. NanoMas prints better performing HF antennas with one tenth of the material on the cheapest polymer films thanks to silver particles only a few nm across. Take the ten times improvement in multi-tag reading from Magellan and the ten times improvement in range from DAG and, excitingly, it can be seen that most of these huge leaps forward can be used together for even greater gains. It is likely to make HF pull ahead as candidate for the biggest emerging market of all - very high volume item tagging. Forecasts by application are given, for tags, readers and services. The following is an example of the split between the money spent on HF RFID tags versus systems (including readers) for smart ticketing applications. table Of Content executive Summary And Conclusions HF RFID The Great Leap Forward
  2. 2. 1. Introduction 1.1. Many Frequencies Will Always Be Needed 1.2. Why Hf Is The Favourite Rfid Frequency 1.2.1. Hf Compared 1.2.2. The Myth Of The One Meter Limit To Hf Range 1.2.3. Fractal Antennas 1.2.4. Hf Promoted For Difficult Environments 1.2.5. Swept Hf 1.3. How Uhf Has Sometimes Been Oversold 1.4. Significance Of Printing Chipless Hf Rfid 1.4.2. Printing Components On Top Of Each Other 1.4.3. How Transistors Are Designed 1.4.4. State Of Play With Frequency Performance And The Markets Opening Up 1.4.5. New Vertical Geometry - Vfets 1.4.6. Organic Printed Transistors In Action - Polyic 1.4.7. Inorganic Compound Semiconductors For Transistors 2. Hf Rfid Enabled Phones Vs Hf Contactless Smart Cards 2008-2018 2.1. Comparison Of Nfc And Rfid Enabled Phones 2.2. Rfid Enabled Phones Etc 2.2.1. Why Have Nfc? 2.2.2. Near Field Communications And Rfid Enabled Phones 2.2.3. Massive Success In Japan, Haggling And Delayed Rollout Elsewhere 2.2.4. Unlimited Options For Value Added Services 2.2.5. The Telcos Are Winning 2.2.6. Where In The Phone? 2.2.7. The (never Ending) Trials 2.2.8. Consumer Response - Say One Thing, Do Another? 2.2.9. Examples Of Trials Of Nfc Phones 2.2.10. Working Groups 2.3. Contactless Cards And Tickets 2.3.1. Sales Projections For Hf Rfid Cards 2.3.2. Sales Projections For Contactless Tickets 2.3.3. Further Growth In Spending 2.3.4. Financial Cards Are A Major New Market 2.3.5. How China Became The World's Largest Market For Contactless Cards And Tickets 2.3.6. Sticking Cards On Phones 2.3.7. Future Card Functionality 2.4. Will One Option Win? 2.4.1. Watch Japan 2.4.2. Companies That Benefit 2.4.3. League Table Of Largest Rfid Companies HF RFID The Great Leap Forward
  3. 3. 3. Kovio - Printed Hf Transistors At One Tenth The Cost Of The Silicon Chip 3.1. Exceptionally High Mobility 3.2. Sharply Reduced Capital And Process Costs 3.3. Background To The Standards Breakthrough 3.4. Standards Beyond Iso 14443 3.5. Product Strategy Of Kovio 3.6. Kovio Rollout 3.7. Details Of Kovio 3.8. Examples Of Kovio Patents 4. Cambridge Resonant Technologies - One Tenth Of The Power And Many Other Advances 4.1. Background 4.1.2. Detuning 4.1.3. Communication Rate 4.2. Ontunetm 4.3. Implementation 4.4. Benefits 4.4.2. Application In Readers 4.4.3. Application In Tags 4.5. Cost 4.6. New Tag Types 4.7. Availability 4.8. Details Of Cambridge Resonant Technologies 5. Dag System - Several Meters Range Now Possible At Hf 5.1. Reading Difficult Obscured Cases In Pallet Loads 5.2. Company Description 5.3. All Rfid Store 5.4. Race Timing 6. Magellan Technology - Ten Times Better Hf Multitag Reading And Other Benefits 6.1. Overview 6.2. The Technology 6.3. Applications 6.3.1. Casino Gaming 6.3.2. Document Management 6.3.3. Medical Implant Tracking 6.3.4. Pharmaceuticals 6.4. Details Of Magellan HF RFID The Great Leap Forward
  4. 4. 7. Other Exciting New Advances In Hf Rfid 7.1. Truly Nano Silver Ink Hf Antennas - Nanomas Technologies 7.2. Additive Process Technologies - Electroplating Hf Antennas On Paper 7.3. Leonhard Kurz - High Quality, Low Cost Hf Antennas 7.4. Sirit Plug-n-play 7.5. Tagsys Hf Advances In 2007/8 7.6. Hf Generation 2 Epc Specification 7.7. Texas Instruments High Security Multifunctional Hf Chips 7.8. Pliant And Powerid 7.9. Supertec Smart Shelves And Kiosks 8. Using The Hf Breakthroughs Together 9. Near Field Uhf Vs Hf For Item Level Tagging - The Biggest Potential Rfid Market 9.1. Needs Of Item Level Rfid 9.2. Hf Is Long Established For Item Level 9.3. Enter Nf Uhf 9.4. Tftcs Not Yet Available And Not Necessarily As Good 9.5. The-package-is-the-tag 9.6. Hf In Retailing 9.7. Uhf Patents Hurdles - Intermec, Via Licensing 9.8. Uhf Regulations Vary Greatly 9.9. The Battle To Make Uhf Usable Worldwide Is Far From Over 9.10. Avoiding Confusion Between Small Items 9.11. Hf Extends Its Reach 9.12. Failing To Learn From History - The Anti-theft Tag Fiasco Repeated With Drug Rfid? 9.13. Playing Catch Up With Hf Specifications 9.14. Strong Marketing Of Uhf - And Some Balancing Comments 9.15. Conclusions appendix 1: Standards appendix 2: Idtechex Publications appendix 3: Glossary ResearchMoz(http://www.researchmoz.us/) is the one stop online destination to find and buy market research HF RFID The Great Leap Forward
  5. 5. reports & Industry Analysis. We fulfill all your research needs spanning across industry verticals with our huge collection of market research reports. We provide our services to all sizes of organizations and across all industry verticals and markets. Our Research Coordinators have in-depth knowledge of reports as well as publishers and will assist you in making an informed decision by giving you unbiased and deep insights on which reports will satisfy your needs at the best price. Contact: M/s Sheela, 90 State Street, Suite 700, Albany NY - 12207 United States Tel: +1-518-618-1030 USA - Canada Toll Free 866-997-4948 Email: sales@researchmoz.us Website: http://www.researchmoz.us/ HF RFID The Great Leap Forward

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