UX Strategy for Any Device

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Now that people experience the web across multiple screens and on many devices, we need a UX strategy that helps us design and deliver those experiences in a way that is both consistent and …

Now that people experience the web across multiple screens and on many devices, we need a UX strategy that helps us design and deliver those experiences in a way that is both consistent and contextual. Designing for motivation, behavior, emotion, and creativity ensures that we put people first and use technology to the fullest advantage.

Keynote presentation from Mobile+Web DevCon in San Francisco, July 2012.

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Transcript

  • 1. Mobile+Web UX Mobile+Web DevCon San Francisco, July 2012
  • 2. Welcome David M. Hogue, Ph.D. VP Experience Design Fluid, San Francisco
  • 3. Devices Today
  • 4. 1.1B+ 227 million current generation video game consoles 26.7 million e-readers sold in the last two years personal computers 18 million on Earth Kinect motion-sensing systems 600 million 400 365 people around the world have broadband lines for Internet access, about the same accessmillion Android million iOS the web through mobile devices devices devices
  • 5. Smartphone TabletDesktop / Laptop e-Reader Television
  • 6. It is amulti-screen world.
  • 7. Click TapGesture Talk
  • 8. The mouse isno longer king.
  • 9. We need aUX strategy that workseverywhere.
  • 10. UX Strategy
  • 11. Technology is great…
  • 12. … but this is really about the people.
  • 13. People first.
  • 14. Motivation Behavior EmotionCreativity
  • 15. Focus on people not technology and solutions emerge.
  • 16. Understand context.
  • 17. Context involves:PeoplePlacesObjectsNeeds (or Wants)UrgencyImportance
  • 18. Core Principles
  • 19. FocusAttention
  • 20. Reduce Cognitive Load
  • 21. AssistMemory
  • 22. Recover from loss and failure.
  • 23. Yes, I know.
  • 24. MakeConnections
  • 25. FosterEmotion
  • 26. Sense the World
  • 27. AskWhat is the purpose?What else might it do?Is it meaningful?Can it be learned quickly?What is unnecessary?What will make it enjoyable?
  • 28. ParticipateUse the device.Join the crowd.Immerse and observe.
  • 29. Embrace chaos.
  • 30. UX Tactics
  • 31. Be ruthless.Understand.Focus.Edit.Edit again.
  • 32. “I saw the angel inthe marble andcarved until I sethim free.”
  • 33. “Get yourselffully dressedand then,beforewalking outthe frontdoor, pauseby the mirrorand removeone item.”
  • 34. “You have to deeply understand the essenceof a product in order to be able to get rid ofthe parts that are not essential.”
  • 35. Focuson only the mostimportant data andactions. There isno roomfor the extraneous.
  • 36. Some essentials…
  • 37. Perceivabilityalways wins.Invisibility is a challenge.
  • 38. Don’t make it seem interactive,if it isn’t interactive.
  • 39. TouchGive enough room.Fitts’ Law (actually, Meyer’s Law.)Tactility invites touch.
  • 40. Dip your fingers…
  • 41. Tapping is easy. Typing is hard.
  • 42. Match keyboard to information.
  • 43. There is no hover with your finger.
  • 44. Gesturesleave no trace. (Well, not much.)
  • 45. Touch Traces
  • 46. The opportunity to gesturecan be difficult to communicate.
  • 47. Leap Motion
  • 48. Overlays for instructions.
  • 49. Show, don’t tell.
  • 50. Visual indicators and hints. Overlays for instructions.
  • 51. GesturesAre easy when they are familiar.Are easy when they make sense.But gestures may still be arbitrary.
  • 52. Swipe to navigate.
  • 53. Pull to refresh.
  • 54. Spread to Insert
  • 55. Gestures may involvemore than the screen, they may involve the entire device.
  • 56. Shake to randomize.
  • 57. Motion can:Provide cues for interaction.Focus attention.Make connections.Facilitate understanding.Establish mental models.
  • 58. Motion conveys meaning.“John Bohannon: Dance vs. Powerpoint, A Modest Proposal” on TED
  • 59. Motion can helpexperiences feel more natural.
  • 60. It is new, and it just feels right.
  • 61. Multiple screensrequire designs that are responsive.
  • 62. Create layoutswhose elementsflow andadaptbetween thebreak points.
  • 63. People expect to have the same experienceeverywhere.
  • 64. Future UX
  • 65. Move beyond tasks to focus on abilities.
  • 66. It will not be about what we need to do. It will be about what we can do.
  • 67. Mobile TodayNew ways of doing common things.News, books, music, photos, sharing,buying, finding, learning, navigating,scheduling, contacting…All from our pockets.
  • 68. Analysts said mobile devices are only good forcontent and contact.
  • 69. But we quickly discovered we couldcreate things.
  • 70. We create information.
  • 71. We capture the world around us.
  • 72. We sketch and compose.
  • 73. We remix.
  • 74. We create,because we can.
  • 75. In the future our devices will create thingswith us and for us.
  • 76. Device SensesSoundLightTouchLocationOrientationMotionRadio
  • 77. Future Senses?PressureTemperatureHumidityChemicalIR & UVMagnetics
  • 78. Sensordrone
  • 79. Devices willgather information automatically for us.
  • 80. We will be able toaccess and create information anywhere.
  • 81. Interfaces could be integratednearly everywhere, they could be ubiquitous.
  • 82. The growing network of sensing deviceswill understand us and our context.
  • 83. Google Sky augments our reality.
  • 84. Siri and Google Now understand our context.
  • 85. Devices and interfaces will change and become more natural, more organic.
  • 86. Regardless of thetechnology, we are designingfor people.
  • 87. Motivation Behavior EmotionCreativity
  • 88. People first.
  • 89. Thank You David M. Hogue, Ph.D. VP Experience Design Fluid, San Francisco