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Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C
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Cov 09 How To Avoid Failure C

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How to avoid common failures in ceramic tile installations

How to avoid common failures in ceramic tile installations

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  • 1. How to Avoid Failures David M. Gobis CTC CSI ©2009 1
  • 2. Coverings is a Registered Provider with The American Institute of Architects Continuing Education Systems. Credit earned on completion of this program will be reported to CES Records for AIA members. Certificates of Completion for non-AIA members are available on request. This program is registered with the AIA/CES for continuing professional education. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by the AIA of any material of construction or any method or manner of handling, using, distributing, or dealing in any material or product. Questions related to specific materials, methods, and services will be addressed at the conclusion of this presentation. 2
  • 3. Learning Objectives • All tile and setting material is not created equal. Are yours up to the task? • Tile Industry and substrate trades guidelines, valuable resouces. • Is your available labor qualified to do the job? 3
  • 4. Material Selection It is all about •Planning •Selection • Execution 4
  • 5. Planning  The right materials for the application  The right method for the application  The right labor skills for the job 5
  • 6. Proper Planning is About This Not this 6
  • 7. Most Common Complaints • Movement Joints • Substrates • Waterproofing • Large Tile • Thinsets 7
  • 8. Substrate Issues 8
  • 9. Appropriate Substrate Concrete American Concrete Tile Council of North America Institute American National Standards • ACI 302.2R-21 • F-113 • CHAPTER 5—FLOOR COVERING slab to be well cured, dimensionally AND ADHESIVE MANUFACTURER’S stable, and free of cracks, waxy or oily RECOMMENDATIONS films, and curing compounds. • 5.1—Introduction • ANSI A108.01 The architect and engineer should • 3.1.2.1 communicate to ensure that the • Do not use liquid curing compounds or requirements for floor coverings in other coatings that may prevent Division 9 of Construction bonding of tile setting materials to Specifications Institute (2000) slabs. Use control joints through the specifications are compatible with slab and tile finish as specified or Division 3 requirements for concrete in where cracks are anticipated.” the same specification 9
  • 10. Substrate Preparation Clean Bondable 10
  • 11. Proper Substrate Preparation YES ! NO !!!!! 11
  • 12. Wood Substrates 12
  • 13. Appropriate Substrate Wood Engineered Wood Assoc. Tile Industry • maximum variation in plywood surface shall not exceed 1/4" in10'-0" and 1/16" in 1'-0" from the required plane. Adjacent edges of plywood sheets— www.apawood.or max. 1/32" above or below g each other. • floor systems, including the framing system and subfloor panels, over which tile will be installed shall be in conformance with the IRC 13
  • 14. Large Tile 14
  • 15. Big Tile and Patterns Consider 1/3 offset with Make sure modular 12x24 tile patterns fit To minimize any natural warpage
  • 16. This recent Standards revision now includes a category for Rectified Tile
  • 17. Lippage Allowances (minus warpage) Tile Type Tile Size Grout Joint Width Allowable Glazed wall/Mosaics 1” x 1” to 6”x6” 1/8” or less 1/32” Quarry 6” x 6” to 8”x8” 1/4“ or greater 1/16” Paver (porcelain) All 1/8” to 1/4“ 1/32” Paver (porcelain) All 1/4“ or greater 1/16” 1/32” of an inch is .0312 or about the thickness of a credit card 1/16” of an inch is .0625 or about the thickness of a penny
  • 18. Lighting Critical Lighting Effects 18
  • 19. Planning for Waterproofing The right materials for the application The right method for the application The right labor skills for the job 19
  • 20. Appropriate Design 3 Years Old 2 Years Old 20
  • 21. Appropriate Design One Year Old 21
  • 22. Appropriate Design And Even More Bad Ideas 22
  • 23. Appropriate Design Showers Need Effective Waterproofing Board set Door on tub Nail Waterproofing 23
  • 24. Appropriate Design Plumbing code may be insufficient to protect the structure 24
  • 25. Enhanced? Appropriate Design Consider waterproofing the entire area at the surface 25
  • 26. Thinsets 26
  • 27. Mortar / Dry-Set / Thin-set Confusing Terminology • ANSI 118.1 Dry-Portland Cement (Un-modified Thin-set) • ANSI 118.4 Latex or Polymer-Portland Cement Mortar (Modified Thin-set) – Wall Tile Thin-set Mortar (Non-Sag Mortar) – Crack Prevention Mortar (Flexible Thin-set) – Complete Contact Mortar (No Back Buttering over flat surfaces) – Rapid Setting Mortar (allows grouting and foot traffic faster) – Medium Bed Mortars (Apply up to ¾” without excess shinkage ) – ANSI 118.11 EGP Latex Mortar (Thin-set Over Plywood)
  • 28. Get Specific Recommendations for Glass Tile 28
  • 29. Not All Thinsets Suitable for Exterior Use 29
  • 30. Ceramic Tile is NOT Structural Always make sure the method used for installation provides at least 80% coverage equally distributed, 95% in wet areas or exterior applications.
  • 31. Dots Don’t Work! 31
  • 32. Ridges, Exterior Deck, Freeze/Thaw 32
  • 33. Movement Joints 33
  • 34. Always Provide Movement Joints • interior — 20’ to 25' in each direction. • exterior — 8' to 12' in each direction. • interior tilework exposed to direct sunlight or moisture — 8’ to 12' • where tilework abuts restraining surfaces • same as grout joint, but not less than 1/4".
  • 35. Incorporated into Every Job 35
  • 36. Recent Job 36
  • 37. The Question is NOT Will There be Movement It Is How Much 37
  • 38. Questions? Dave Gobis Independent Technical Consultant 262-994-1175 dave@ceramictileconsultant.com © 2009 38

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