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  • Have slide up while attendees are entering the room and seating themselves.
  • Welcome to Part I of Advanced Technical Credit professional development training for statewide articulation! Some of you may already know me, but for those of you who don’t, I’m (your name here) with (your organization name here) and I am here today to provide overview training on the Advanced Technical Credit Program and the statewide articulation process. How many of you are familiar with statewide articulation? (Show of hands.) Alright. That’s great! Well, hopefully, if you ARE somewhat familiar with Tech Prep and statewide articulation, this training session will provide you with additional details; and if you AREN’T familiar with Tech Prep or statewide articulation, this session will provide answers to some of the questions you may have. Okay, first of all, let’s take care of a little housekeeping. (Let the attendees know where the rest rooms, etc. are located).
  • Okay, what is the purpose of ATC professional development training and who should attend? Part I of ATC professional development is for ALL high school teachers whose degree, work experience, and teaching certification will qualify them to teach content-enhanced, statewide-articulated courses. To offer a statewide-articulated course, teachers must: Complete this Part I session; Complete one or more Part II training sessions in which you will meet with college faculty members to discuss specific college course competencies; and Be able to teach the higher-level course content described in the ATC course competency profiles. If you will NOT be teaching a statewide-articulated course, or do not meet the teacher eligibility requirements, you are welcome to stay and listen and hopefully the material presented will allow you to become knowledgeable about the articulation process and Tech Prep.  
  • Schools cannot offer a statewide-articulated course without an ATC-eligible and trained teacher who can provide a college-level course for his/her students. You are getting this training so you will know what content and student outcomes are required in order to teach ATC courses – not to see if your current courses can be articulated. ATC (statewide-articulated) courses must cover competencies beyond the TEKS, which are approved for the related non-ATC courses and you will need to enhance the course content before your district can offer the course. This approval is YOUR approval. Upon completion of the approval process, you may teach the ATC courses for which you have received approval - regardless of WHERE in Texas you teach. And as long as you attend the re-certification training every three years, you will maintain this approval. (Your school district may have additional certification requirements to teach a specific course.)
  • Since articulated course credit is being awarded through community, technical, or state colleges, the same Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS)-enforced requirements for college faculty must apply to the high school faculty who are teaching the content-enhanced articulated courses. For this reason, in addition to your SBEC certification or deficiency plan, there are additional eligibility requirements you must meet in order to receive approval to teach ATC courses. They are: Teachers must meet college requirements: Requirement 1: The teacher must have a baccalaureate degree or higher in the teaching discipline. OR Requirement 2: The teacher must have a minimum of an associate degree and 3 years verifiable non-teaching work experience directly related to the teaching discipline. Alright, any questions? (Allow audience to respond; answer questions as needed.)
  • If you are not approved to teach the ATC level course, it doesn’t mean that there is something wrong with your certificate to teach. It simply means that you did not meet the ATC requirements. Once your Part I and Part II Forms are completed, they are mailed to our state office in Stephen F. Austin University in Nacadoches. The state office is the one that does all of the verification of forms, etc. Consequently, you may be contacted to provide further information if required.
  • To maintain eligibility, Part I and Part II training must be repeated every three years.
  • Since articulated course credit is being awarded through community, technical, or state colleges, the same Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS)-enforced requirements for college faculty must apply to the high school faculty who are teaching the content-enhanced articulated courses. For this reason, in addition to your SBEC certification or deficiency plan, there are additional eligibility requirements you must meet in order to receive approval to teach ATC courses. They are: • A minimum of an associate’s or bachelor’s degree with a major directly related to the field in which you are teaching; OR a bachelor’s degree with a minor of a minimum of 18 semester credit hours directly related to the field in which you are teaching; and A minimum of three years of work experience DIRECTLY related to the field you wish to teach. Alright, any questions? (Allow audience to respond; answer questions as needed.)
  • Attendance at both Part I and Part II ATC professional development is required in order to receive approval to teach the new content-enhanced statewide-articulated courses. In this Part I session, we will discuss Tech Prep, the statewide articulation process, and how you can help your students begin earning college credit statewide-articulated courses. Part II training involves a course-specific discussion of college-level competencies led by faculty who teach the college-equivalent course. The discussion in Part II is intended to assist you with identifying the competencies that your high school course must include in order to be offered as a statewide-articulated course and what knowledge is expected of students. To maintain eligibility, Part I and Part II training must be repeated every three years.
  • This three-hour session is Part I training. Once you’ve attended this session and Part II training for each course you want to teach, and you’ve accurately completed and submitted the appropriate paperwork or on-line registration process at www.ATCTexas.org , you will receive electronic notification letting you know which courses you are eligible to teach. For this reason, be sure to provide an e-mail address. This approval is good for three academic years, and as I mentioned earlier it is assigned to YOU…not the school or your district. Every three years, you will need to verify and update your personal information at www.ATCTexas.org , register for and repeat Part I and Part II training, and you will be approved for another three-year period.
  • During this Part I session, we will discuss College Tech Prep, the statewide articulation process, and how you can help your students begin earning college credit for the approved and statewide-articulated courses your school is either currently offering or is interested in offering.    If you do not attend Part II subject-specific training, remember that you will not be approved to teach ATC statewide-articulated courses until you do. This means that the students you are teaching are not eligible to receive college credit for those courses until you complete Part II and receive formal approval to teach statewide-articulated courses.
  • During this Part I session, we will discuss College Tech Prep, the statewide articulation process, and how you can help your students begin earning college credit for the approved and statewide-articulated courses your school is either currently offering or is interested in offering.    If you do not attend Part II subject-specific training, remember that you will not be approved to teach ATC statewide-articulated courses until you do. This means that the students you are teaching are not eligible to receive college credit for those courses until you complete Part II and receive formal approval to teach statewide-articulated courses.
  • Dr. Robert Krienke, President of Lamar Institute of Technology is quoted as saying: “It seems that high school students are not fully aware of the excellent opportunities available through technical careers.” This is precisely why we are all here today. Career and technology classes provide tremendous opportunity for our students, and Tech Prep, statewide articulation, and local articulation encourage participation at both the high school and the college levels.
  • According to data provided by Dr. Steve Murdock, a Texas State demographer, if the current demographic population trends continue it is projected that there will be significant social and economic consequences in Texas in the coming years. Since household income is directly related to education level, we must focus on getting college-age adults into higher education. Tech Prep begins to address this issue by encouraging high school students to begin taking higher-level technical courses, and the ATC program supports that effort. By encouraging our high school students to work toward the goal of completing a certification or associate degree program at a community college, we are able to provide businesses with skilled, educated employees in order to remain competitive in the global marketplace. In turn, spending on prisons, welfare and Medicaid should be reduced as a result of more students obtaining well-paying, highly skilled jobs.
  • Though this graph was prepared in 1998, it very clearly identifies the continual decrease in average household income over the next 28 years. This is a dismal forecast for those of us who will be supported as retirees in the year 2030.  
  • As this slide points out, the majority of jobs available over the next several generations will be technical jobs. These jobs require a specific skill set and knowledge base typically demanding more than a high school diploma, but not requiring a bachelor’s degree. This is, of course, where Tech Prep comes into play as a means to increase employment rates and average household income by providing a mechanism for high school students to begin their technical college education while still in high school. Depending on their course of study, students may be eligible to receive an average of 12 hours of college credit – and possibly more - before they even step foot in a college classroom!
  • Welcome to Part I of Advanced Technical Credit professional development training for statewide articulation! Some of you may already know me, but for those of you who don’t, I’m (your name here) with (your organization name here) and I am here today to provide overview training on the Advanced Technical Credit Program and the statewide articulation process. How many of you are familiar with statewide articulation? (Show of hands.) Alright. That’s great! Well, hopefully, if you ARE somewhat familiar with Tech Prep and statewide articulation, this training session will provide you with additional details; and if you AREN’T familiar with Tech Prep or statewide articulation, this session will provide answers to some of the questions you may have. Okay, first of all, let’s take care of a little housekeeping. (Let the attendees know where the rest rooms, etc. are located).
  • Again, the focus of this slide shows the large percentage of non-professional, skilled labor job opportunities available. Tech Prep is able to aid in filling those positions by preparing our young adults for them beginning in high school.
  • Unfortunately, just a very short time ago the majority of our high school students were following only the minimum plan for graduation. And, almost 50% of high school students were preparing for entrance into a 4-year degree program, though the majority of jobs that are available now do not require a 4-year degree. But this is changing – last year about 62% of Tech Prep seniors graduated with a college preparatory plan. Tech Prep, through the articulation process, prepares students for the challenges they’ll face in the workforce, while saving these same students valuable time and money.
  • [Transition slide…no script.]
  • Tech Prep is a federally funded initiative to improve the transition of high school students into higher education. In its most simple form, Tech Prep is a process that links curricula from different educational levels to create a non-duplicative program of study to facilitate this “seamless” education. That is, to allow for a very natural – almost unnoticeable – transition from high school to college and into the world of work. A Tech Prep program consists of a state-approved 6-year plan or program of study that includes a high school coherent sequence of 2 or more career & technology, or CATE, courses that total 3 or more credits. This 6-year plan accounts for the natural transition from high school to higher education. At least one of these courses must be eligible for college credit either by statewide articulation, local articulation, or dual/concurrent enrollment .
  • In order to effect change, we must find new ways to increase high school retention and graduation rates, as well as ways to increase the number of students going to and graduating from two-year and four-year colleges.   To do this, we must:   Address the needs of the “middle 50%” and under-represented groups; Combine higher level academics with hands-on skills; and Increase the number of students interested in technical careers.  
  • Career awareness activities are essential for promoting Tech Prep programs and recruiting students. This function involves a comprehensive, coordinated counseling network of the facilities, programs, and skills of junior high/middle school, high school, and post-secondary professionals. As you can see by this chart, the largest areas of participation in Tech Prep are in Business, Health, and Engineering related fields of study. While this information is of interest in and of itself, it is particularly interesting when coupled with the knowledge that attendance and graduation rates continue to increase annually for students enrolled in coherent course sequences in career and technology. In addition graduation rates are continually increasing for all CATE course sequence takers, ESPECIALLY Tech Prep students!  
  • Tech Prep programs MUST:   Show proven demand in a high-wage, high-skill area; Include a state-approved 6-year plan of study; Combine rigorous academics and workforce skills taught in context; Provide work-based experiences; Include options to earn potential college credit at the high school level; and Lead to an associate degree in a technical field.   In addition, career guidance and counseling, as well as interest and aptitude testing, should be provided for students no later than the freshman year of high school.
  • Tech Prep Program articulation links high school programs of study with college programs to assist students in making a smooth transition from one level of education to another. Tech Prep program articulation always includes, and is initiated around, a signed document that indicates the specific responsibilities of the secondary school, the postsecondary institution, and the student. This document is referred to as a program articulation agreement , and includes an outline of the recommended high school graduation plan and the associate degree plan – in other words, a six-year plan or program of study. A College Tech Prep Program agreement can include both locally and statewide-articulated courses as part of the six-year program of study.
  • Six-year plans are not only a critical piece of the College Tech Prep equation, but they are in fact a requirement. On this slide you can see we have a 6-year plan for Professional Office Technology.   The courses that articulate are indicated in red and blue type, depending on the type of articulation option available. Students are encouraged to enroll in these courses during the specific high school years indicated on the plan. This ensures that the sequence of courses is completed during the junior or senior year.  
  • Students participating in Tech Prep programs may earn college credit through:   1. Statewide and/or local articulation of technical courses; 2. Dual credit by concurrent enrollment in technical and/or academic courses; and/or 3. The College Board Advanced Placement (AP) program for academic courses.   In addition, Tech Prep, through the articulation process, provides a mechanism for students to receive credit for advanced measures for the Distinguished Achievement Program. For example, a one-credit statewide-articulated course is eligible for a Distinguished Achievement Program advanced measure if it:   Is completed with a grade of 80 or higher; AND Is completed in the junior or senior year.
  • In this view, it is much easier to see which classes articulate under local agreements and which articulate under the ATC program, or in other words, are statewide-articulated.  
  • How many of you are familiar with the Texas Education Agency’s Public Education Information Management System (better known as PEIMS) codes for student reporting? Does anyone also know what is reported in PEIMS and how some data impacts funding? Does anyone know how student reporting relates to how much federal Perkins funding a district receives? (Wait for response.) Okay, good. For those of you who are familiar with student reporting for Perkins funding, this will be a nice refresher. For those of you who are unfamiliar with this topic, PEIMS codes are a critical piece of Tech Prep.
  • While you may be somewhat familiar with PEIMS codes, they play a large part in Tech Prep and statewide articulation and it is important that you become very familiar with the portion of PEIMS that is directly related to coding career and technology courses and students. First ATC statewide-articulated courses have a PEIMS course code number that distinguishes it from the non-statewide-articulated version of the course. All courses ending with “-TP are statewide-articulated courses. But don’t confuse this new suffix to mean “Tech Prep”; it actually stands for “Technical Placement”, and is only intended to identify content-enhanced statewide-articulated courses. Also, ATC course numbers include a "T.“ Second, PEIMS codes identify the level of participation by students in career and technology courses, and whether or not they intend to participate in a Tech Prep program, which includes participation in articulated or dual credit technical courses. There are four levels in the student coding system, and we will discuss these in great detail on the next several slides.
  • A CATE PEIMS code of zero (0) indicates that the student is not enrolled in a Career and Technology course at the time of the October course enrollment snap shot date. A PEIMS code of one (1) identifies the student as being enrolled in a career and technology course at the time of the October course enrollment snap shot date, but not as having a 4-year high school plan of study outlining a coherent sequence of courses in career and technology. This means that, although the student is enrolled in one or more CATE courses, they have not opted to participate in a coherent sequence of career and technology courses.  
  • Alright, this is where things get a little more complicated. PEIMS Codes 2 and 3 are BOTH used to identify students participating in a coherent sequence of CATE courses, however:   PEIMS code 2 students have a 4-year high school plan of study to take 2 or more career and technology courses for 3 or more credits in a program that is not a part of a state-approved 6-year College Tech Prep program.   PEIMS code 3 students also have a 4-year high school plan of study to take 2 or more career and technology courses, but these courses ARE part of an approved College Tech Prep program, such as a Family and Consumer Sciences program.   A student that meets these requirements can be coded a 2 or a 3 even if they are not enrolled in a CATE course at the time of the October course enrollment snap shot date, as long as they are enrolled in or have completed at least one CATE course.  
  • During the fall PEIMS submission each year, a school provides information to the TEA on each student’s level of participation in career and technology courses and programs. This information helps to determine the allocation of federal Perkins funds to the school districts, and aids TEA in meeting federal reporting requirements. 5% of Perkins funds are allocated based on a district’s percentage of the total career and technology participants statewide. In addition, another 5% of Perkins funding is allocated based on the number of students participating in coherent sequences of CATE courses, including those participating in Tech Prep programs. The trick here is to identify those students based on one of the 4 levels outlined here:  
  • During the fall PEIMS submission each year, a school provides information to the TEA on each student’s level of participation in career and technology courses and programs. This information helps to determine the allocation of federal Perkins funds to the school districts, and aids TEA in meeting federal reporting requirements. 5% of Perkins funds are allocated based on a district’s percentage of the total career and technology participants statewide. In addition, another 5% of Perkins funding is allocated based on the number of students participating in coherent sequences of CATE courses, including those participating in Tech Prep programs. The trick here is to identify those students based on one of the 4 levels outlined here:  
  • During the fall PEIMS submission each year, a school provides information to the TEA on each student’s level of participation in career and technology courses and programs. This information helps to determine the allocation of federal Perkins funds to the school districts, and aids TEA in meeting federal reporting requirements. 5% of Perkins funds are allocated based on a district’s percentage of the total career and technology participants statewide. In addition, another 5% of Perkins funding is allocated based on the number of students participating in coherent sequences of CATE courses, including those participating in Tech Prep programs. The trick here is to identify those students based on one of the 4 levels outlined here:  
  • During the fall PEIMS submission each year, a school provides information to the TEA on each student’s level of participation in career and technology courses and programs. This information helps to determine the allocation of federal Perkins funds to the school districts, and aids TEA in meeting federal reporting requirements. 5% of Perkins funds are allocated based on a district’s percentage of the total career and technology participants statewide. In addition, another 5% of Perkins funding is allocated based on the number of students participating in coherent sequences of CATE courses, including those participating in Tech Prep programs. The trick here is to identify those students based on one of the 4 levels outlined here:  
  • Determining how to code a student is easier using the flow diagram shown here. This diagram - provided by TEA - is easy to follow and a great tool for determining PEIMS coding. (Facilitators: consider providing a copy of this flow chart in the handouts you provide.) Student reporting provides valuable information about the success of all students. In this manner, we can compare students’ attendance and drop-out rates, graduation rates and plans, test scores, and college enrollment and employment placement data.   Also, before we go on, it is important to note that school districts reporting students as 2s and 3s receive more funding than those only reporting students as 0s and 1s. While it’s important to accurately report 2s and 3s, it’s to your disadvantage not to report them at all…and not reporting may trigger a District Effectiveness and Compliance (or DEC) visit.
  • [Transition slide…no script.]
  • [Transition slide…no script.]
  • There are two main types of articulation that you may hear discussed – sometimes almost interchangeably. However, each type of articulation is different. The two types are: 1) program articulation, and 2) course articulation . Tech Prep six-year plans are examples of program articulation. Local articulation and statewide articulation are examples of course articulation, which may be included in Tech Prep programs. Another type of articulation you may hear post-secondary educators discussing refers to the articulation of credit between two-year colleges and four-year universities. Though this is a type of articulation that may be beneficial to your students, for the purposes of today’s training, we’re not going to discuss this type of articulation.  
  • Local articulation agreements s are course-to-course agreements between a local school district or high school and a community or technical college. Schools and colleges participating in the Advanced Technical Credit (ATC) Program only need local articulation agreements for high school courses not included in the ATC course crosswalk and where the college doesn't offer the ATC college-course equivalent. In situations where a local school cannot meet the requirements of a statewide-articulated course, a local articulation agreement may be negotiated with a community college for a non-ATC course.  
  • The Advanced Technical Credit (ATC) Program (statewide articulation) is an advanced placement process designed by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board and the Texas Education Agency. The program requires that high school courses be enhanced to include the same course competencies that the equivalent college course would include. In this way, students are provided an early start in a college-level technical program. The program provides participating schools and colleges a common statewide standard for the award of college credit for a common core of content-enhanced high school course. We’ll discuss this type of articulation in much more detail as we move on through this presentation.
  • Unlike local articulation agreements that may exist between a particular high school or school district and a community or technical college, courses included in the ATC program (covered by the standard articulation agreement) allow students to move almost anywhere in the state to attend college. Currently, many community colleges in Texas are participating in the ATC Program with only a few exceptions. A complete list of participating community, technical, and state colleges can be found on the ATCTexas.org and the TechPrepTexas.org websites. Since articulation is a process that links curricula from different educational levels to create a non-duplicative program of study, its value to our students is that they can earn college credits while still in high school, saving them (and their parents) valuable time and money by reducing the number of college courses they must complete once they reach the community college level.
  • Statewide articulation is NOT the same as Tech Prep. Statewide articulation is one method for earning college credits while still in high school . More fully, Tech Prep is a careful balance between technology, occupational subjects and traditional academics. In order to facilitate student interest, the traditional academic concepts are taught in a relevant, contextual manner. That is, these concepts are tied directly to the Tech Prep content area in order to show the student the relationship between the academic concepts and their desired field of study. Tech Prep programs are developed to meet the needs of tomorrow’s workforce, and begin with the student developing a 6 year plan of study in the 9th grade. A specific sequence of courses is outlined in the plan, with each course preparing the student for completion of an AAS degree and entry into the workforce.
  •   There are, however, a few key details to making this program work. First, ATC high school courses MUST be enhanced to include course competencies for the equivalent community college course or courses. Statewide-articulated course competencies are currently being developed to help you understand what is required in a statewide-articulated course. Part II of this Professional Development provides an opportunity to discuss course competency requirements with college faculty who teach the college-equivalent courses. It is critical that you attend Part II Professional Development in order to determine what you must teach in a statewide-articulated course. If after completing Part II Professional Development you discover that you CANNOT teach the enhanced material at your current school, you cannot teach the statewide-articulated course. Second, statewide-articulated high school courses must be at least one full credit, or be offered in approved combinations noted in the course crosswalk so that the completion of multiple courses is equal to one credit.
  •    Third, high school teachers must hold the appropriate credentials and be officially approved to teach the content-enhanced courses. Until you receive a Certificate of Eligibility from the state ATC office, you are not eligible to teach a statewide-articulated course. Teachers will be notified electronically of their approval status and will be able to print their certificates from the ATC web site.
  • In order for a student to qualify for award of college credit for statewide- articulated courses, they must meet the requirements of the ATC Programs’ Standard Articulation Agreement. These requirements are:   1. Students must complete the ATC articulated course or the last course in an ATC articulated sequence of courses in their junior or senior year. Sequences and single courses completed prior to the junior year will NOT articulate!   2. Students must earn a minimum of an 80% (3.0 grade point) in the course or all courses in an ATC articulated sequence of courses.  
  • In order for a student to qualify for award of college credit for statewide- articulated courses, they must meet the requirements of the ATC Programs’ Standard Articulation Agreement. These requirements are:   1. Students must complete the ATC articulated course or the last course in an ATC articulated sequence of courses in their junior or senior year. Sequences and single courses completed prior to the junior year will NOT articulate!   2. Students must earn a minimum of an 80% (3.0 grade point) in the course or all courses in an ATC articulated sequence of courses.  
  • 3. Students must enroll in a participating college within 15 months of high school graduation and declare a related technical major. This time limit can be extended at the college’s discretion. 4. And lastly, effective January 2004, credit is awarded on enrollment and declaration of a technical major; however, a college may elect to require up to six non-developmental college hours to be earned before college credit will be awarded. These six hours can be earned through dual credit, AP or CLEP. This potentially gives students a significant head start on their college coursework!
  • While the advantages of participating in the ATC Program far outweigh the limitations, there are some disadvantages that should be pointed out. First and foremost, as mentioned on the previous slide, not all colleges are participating. However, approximately 65 public two-year colleges have expressed an interest in participating in statewide articulation. A second limitation of ATC is that not all courses or programs are offered at all colleges. So while statewide articulation does allow the student more flexibility than local articulation agreements, there is no guarantee for the student that the college they wish to attend offers the program or courses they are seeking. It is up to the student to determine whether or not the college they’ve chosen offers the program they are pursuing. Lastly, most colleges require that the student apply the courses to a two-year technical certificate or degree program in order to receive credit, although the courses can be used as electives.
  • So, let’s take a high-level look at how the program works. Once the student enrolls in the content-enhanced course or sequence of courses, they must complete that course or ATC- required sequence of courses in the junior or senior year with an 80% or better. If the student does not complete the course or sequence in his junior or senior year OR does not receive an 80 or better, the student is not eligible to receive ATC articulated credit. All statewide-articulated courses MUST be listed on a student’s transcript with an “A” code, and all Tech Prep course numbers MUST end with the letters “TP”. This provides colleges with the information needed to evaluate the transcript. The student must then enroll in a participating community college within 15 months of graduation. This time limit may be extended by the college, if they choose; however, it is entirely up to the college to determine whether they opt to do so or not. Once the student has enrolled in a participating college, the student must declare a technical major. Beginning January 2004, credit is awarded on enrollment for all content-enhanced, approved articulation courses or course sequences completed during the junior or senior year of high school with a grade of 80% or better that the college offers. Colleges may elect to require up to six hours of non-developmental college course credit in any subject area before the student is awarded credit. These six hours may be earned through dual credit, AP or CLEP. In such cases, once the student enrolls at the college and declares a technical major, he or she is awarded college credit for all successfully completed articulated courses as long as they were completed according to the ATC Program standards we’ve discussed.
  • Once all requirements for award of statewide-articulated credit have been met, the student must complete and submit a Petition for Award of Articulated Credit form to the college. Once the petition is submitted, credit will be awarded. It is the students’ responsibility, however, to make sure that the petition is completed and submitted.
  • Working in small groups or pairs at your chairs, determine whether or not the students in the following examples are eligible to receive college credit for the courses they’ve completed. For each example, I’ll give you a minute or two to work with your neighbor to determine whether or not the student is eligible for credit.   (Give the audience a minute or two to complete each example before you review the example and move on to the next one in the activity.)
  • (These examples can be covered by the facilitator or the facilitator may ask for volunteers to tell whether each student is eligible to receive college credit for the courses outlined and why.)   In our first example, Student A earns an 80 in Business Computer Information Systems 1 in the 9 th grade, but takes no other career and technology or ATC-approved courses. Is she eligible for college credit? (Allow volunteer to respond if desired.)   No…Student A is not eligible for college credit because the course was not taken in the junior or senior year.
  • In this example, Student B earns a 90 in Business Computer Information Systems 1 in 9th grade and takes no other career and technology or ATC-approved courses until 12th grade when the student takes BCIS2. Is the student eligible for college credit? (Allow volunteer to respond if desired.)  
  • Yes…Student B is eligible for college credit because both courses were completed with at least an 80 AND the FINAL course was taken in the senior year. In addition, BCIS2 is eligible for a DAP advanced measure.
  • Student C earns an 80 in Nutrition and Food Science in her junior year, and then earns a 75 in Food Science and Technology in her senior year. Is she eligible to receive college credit for these two courses? (Allow volunteer to respond if desired.)  
  • No…Student C is not eligible for college credit because, although the course sequence was completed in the senior year, she only made a 75 in the second course. May she earn credit for the first course? (Allow volunteer to respond if desired.)   Unfortunately for her, she won’t receive credit for the first course because it is only a ½ credit and without successfully completing the second ½ credit course, which is required in the ATC course crosswalk. No college credit can be awarded.
  • [Transition slide…no script.]
  • Three Resources are used extensively in statewide articulation:   1. The articulated course crosswalk; Course Outcomes Enhancements on Crosswalk   The course crosswalk outlines which high school courses articulate for which college courses. In some cases, multiple high school courses must be taken for the student to receive credit for a single college course. In these cases, the courses, when completed successfully, cover the same competencies as the single equivalent college course. The Enhancements compare the expected competencies for each college course with the basic TEKS competencies. Using this tool, high school teachers can compare their existing course competencies to the college course competencies and, in combination with required course competency lists, help to identify exactly what enhancements must be made in order for students to experience a collegiate-equivalent course and be eligible to receive articulated credit.
  • In this view of the ATC crosswalk, you can see how each high school course is matched to an equivalent college course. Depending on the student’s four-year plan and desired interests, the student will enroll in the courses that best fit his needs.   Updates to the crosswalk can be found on the www.techpreptexas.org.
  • This view gives us a closer look at the equivalent high school and college courses.   In addition, notice that under the college   In many cases throughout the Crosswalk, you will notice high school course listings require multiple courses in order to articulate for one specific college-equivalent course. These courses are listed with the word “AND” between courses. In addition, several different high school courses may articulate to one specific college equivalent course. In these cases, the courses are listed with the word “OR” between courses.
  • This view gives us a closer look at the equivalent high school and college courses. Also, as you can see, there is a prerequisite required for the high school Word Processing course. The equivalent course is required for enrollment in ITSW 1301 or GRPH 1329, and is therefore also an expected competency for the Introduction to Word Processing and Word Processing for Desktop Publishers courses.   In addition, notice that under the college WECM Equivalent for the Accounting courses, students who have taken Accounting I at the high school level will receive credit for both the Introduction to Accounting I and II classes. In this particular case, the competencies covered in the high school course are inclusive of the competencies covered in BOTH of the Introduction to Accounting courses.   In many cases throughout the Crosswalk, you will notice high school course listings require multiple courses in order to articulate for one specific college-equivalent course. These courses are listed with the word “AND” between courses. In addition, several different high school courses may articulate to one specific college equivalent course. In these cases, the courses are listed with the word “OR” between courses.   For example, to receive credit for the college course “Principles of Management” (BMGT 1303), high school students must complete courses:   Business Management (1/2 credit) AND Business Ownership (1/2 credit)   For a second example, in order to receive credit for the college course “The Infant and Toddler” (CDEC 1421), high school students must complete courses:   Child Development (1/2 credit) AND Preparation for Parenting (1/2 credit) AND Child Care and Guidance, Management, and Services I, OR Early Childhood Professions I
  • This view gives a full-page view of one page from the Business Education TCAM. If we take a closer look, however…
  • Here’s another detailed example of the crosswalk. In this example, it’s clear to see the course abbreviation, PEIMS number, and name. This information will be very important when we complete the Application for Eligibility form, as you list the courses you are seeking approval for.
  • The state leadership committee is the authority for regulations and guidelines for the statewide program as determined that if 5 community colleges and/or school districts across the state, the State Leadership Committee may recommend the removal of the course. This is an excellent opportunity for a school district to form a local agreement with a college if the course is of interest to them.
  • These are some additional guidelines developed by the state leadership committee.
  • Part II Professional Development allows the high school and community college faculty to talk face to face in order to ensure that the same course content is being taught in courses offered at both levels. This is key to the success of the Advanced Technical Credit (ATC) Program (statewide articulation). Although standardized course requirements are being developed for all of the high school courses included in the ATC course crosswalk, it is critical that both the colleges and the high schools think in terms of competency-based instruction…after all, isn’t that what articulation and College Tech Prep is all about…preparing students to be successful when they get into the workforce?!
  • When you meet with the college faculty during Part II, they should provide you with all essential information for the college equivalent of the course you are seeking approval to teach. This includes a course syllabus stating required course competencies, textbook requirements and any special software or hardware used within the course. In addition, they should provide you with a breakdown of the weighing of all projects, exams, homework, quizzes, etc. that are used to evaluate their students. This information will help you determine what content you will need to include in the ATC course you will be teaching so your students will be eligible to receive college credit.   Also, college faculty should provide some general information regarding related college programs. For example, job potential, entry-level salaries, etc., for the types of jobs for which the course(s) prepare students.
  • Part II will be informally structured allowing you to ask whatever questions you may have of the college faculty. Make sure that you are familiar with requirements for all supplies necessary for the course, and review the course competencies and expected learner outcomes to ensure that your students are eligible for articulated credit. Discuss with the college faculty the changes that you feel need to be made to the existing course TEKS in order to qualify them for an ATC statewide-articulated course, and get their input.   And lastly, use Part II as an opportunity to build a stronger bond between your school or school district and your local community college. Your students will be better for it!
  • All teachers must sign a sign-in sheet for each course.
  • Welcome to Part I of Statewide Articulation Professional Development training! Some of you may already know me, but for those of you who don’t, I’m (your name here) with (your organization name here) and I am here today to provide overview training on Statewide Articulation. How many of you are familiar with the Statewide Articulation Program? (Show of hands.) Alright. That’s great! Well, hopefully, if you ARE somewhat familiar with Tech Prep and Statewide Articulation, this training session will provide you with additional details; and if you AREN’T familiar with Tech Prep or Statewide Articulation, this session will provide answers to some of the questions you may have. Okay, first of all, let’s take care of a little housekeeping. If you haven’t done so, please be sure that you sign in before you leave today so we know you attended training.
  • Before we get started completing the ATC Application for Eligibility, there are a couple things to keep in mind.   First of all, all information MUST be completed in black ink. If you do not have a black pen, I have some extras. Also, do NOT write on the back of the form. If you need additional space, please see me. It is very important that all information requested is provided and that it is accurate.   Next, this form is verification of YOUR participation – not that of your school. For this reason, it is important that all the contact information be completed for YOU…not your school. Your home address and phone number must be your HOME address and phone number. This way, if there are questions about your form, you can be contacted directly. Also, your approval certificate will be mailed directly to your house.   Lastly, this form must be returned to me so that I can mail it in for approval. This is very important. Individual forms may not be submitted; they MUST be sent in by an approved facilitator. In addition, they must be postmarked by July 31st in order to receive approval for the following school year. For example, forms submitted by July 31st, 2003 will be approved for three academic years, beginning with the 2003-2004 school year.   Alright, with that said, let’s get started completing the form.
  • Alright, everyone must have a copy of the ATC Application for Eligibility form for Part I Professional Development, which looks like the one here. If you don’t have one now, you need to pick one up so we can complete it together.   (Give time for everyone to get ready.)
  • Alright, everyone must have a copy of the ATC Application for Eligibility form for Part I Professional Development, which looks like the one here. If you don’t have one now, you need to pick one up so we can complete it together.   (Give time for everyone to get ready.)
  • Okay, we’re going to simply work our way down the form, step by step. If you have questions, please stop me.   First, for “Staff Development Provider”, enter ___(your provider name here; for example “Gulf Coast Education That Works”)___.   Leave the CPE Provider Number blank. I will complete this section before submitting the forms.   Has everyone completed this section of the form? (Allow audience to respond.) Okay, good. Let’s go on to the next section. NOTE:   You may choose to allow your audience to fill in the CPE Provider Number. However, it is recommended that you complete this information yourself after the Professional Development session in order to increase the likelihood that the forms will be returned to you and thus submitted properly for approval.   Also, to aid in completion of this section, write your provider name on a white or chalk board – or create a PowerPoint slide with this information - prior to the Professional Development session.
  • Alright, this next section of the form is your personal information. First, enter your first and last name. Also, on the second line (Name on SBEC Texas Educator Certificate) include your maiden name or any other name that your SBEC certification might be filed under. Next, enter the name of your high school, and then the name of your school district. Please do NOT abbreviate! For example, HISD can mean many things. Now, enter your HOME address, city, state and zip code. And YOUR HOME phone number, including area code. Remember, this is NOT the school’s address or phone number. This information will be used to contact you if there are questions regarding your form, and to mail your approval certificate to you. The school will receive a separate listing of all employees who have completed Professional Development, but the certificate will be mailed DIRECTLY to you. After you’ve entered your address and phone number, write in your social security number. This information will only be used to aid in retrieving your SBEC certification information. Including your social security number on the form is strictly optional, however it is VERY HELPFUL when verifying your SBEC certification when necessary, and for assuring that your records are not confused with those of another teacher with the same name. Lastly, enter an email address where you can be contacted if the ATC office has additional questions about any information on this form. (Give the audience time to complete all information.) Any questions so far? (Allow audience to respond; answer questions as needed.) Alright, let’s go on.
  • Okay, this area is used for your SBEC certification information. If you are a Texas Certified teacher, put a checkmark in the “YES” checkbox and enter your area of certification to the right. If you have more than one certification area, enter all that are DIRECTLY related to the areas for which you are seeking approval. Also, this certification is very specific, so please don’t use terms like “Education” or “Drafting” that do not reflect legitimate CTE certifications. If you have a deficiency plan, check the “NO” box, and list the specific name and expected completion date of your deficiency plan on the right. In the work history table, under the “Employer” and “Position Held” headings, list all jobs you’ve held – besides teaching – that have added DIRECT experience and knowledge to the area(s) for which you are seeking approval. Next, for each employer and position, under the “Duration” heading, enter how LONG you held each position. This is not the actual dates, but rather the LENGTH OF EMPLOYMENT. For example, if you are submitting the form for approval to teach Basic Business and you worked as an office manager from January, 1990-March, 1995, you would enter 5 years, 2 months under the “Duration” heading. Remember, if you are not SBEC Certified, you MUST clearly document that you have 3 years of RELEVEANT work experience. However, if you are SBEC certified, the work experience will be on file with SBEC so you may be more general in your work experience description. (Give the audience time to complete all information.) Okay, last but not least, list any special certifications you hold – such as CISCO, NATEF, health-related licensures or certifications, etc. - and remember to attach documentation to the form when you submit it for approval. Any questions so far? (Allow audience to respond; answer questions as needed.) Okay, let’s go on.
  • Okay, we’re almost done! This next section is where you will list your education information. First, check the box to the left of EACH degree you have earned. If you have one degree, this process is pretty simple for you. If you have multiple degrees (for example, a Bachelor’s and a Master’s), put a check next to EACH. Next, for each degree that you checked off, list your major. Also, list your minor if: It is DIRECTLY RELEVANT to the courses you are requesting approval to teach; and It took AT LEAST 18 semester credit hours in that minor. Be very specific here about your degree information, and use the same terms your college/university used when issuing the degree. Alright. Now, for each degree you checked off, list the institution from which you received each respective degree. Also, if you have space, list the year each degree was earned. Again, if you have one degree, this is pretty quick. If you have multiple degrees, you will need to list this information for EACH degree. (Give the audience time to complete all information.) Alright, is everyone still with me? (Wait for response.) Any questions? (Wait for response; answer questions as needed.) Okay, lastly, sign and date the form where it says “Teacher’s Signature” and “Date”. Do NOT sign in the gray shaded area! This area is where I sign the form verifying that I’ve reviewed the form to make sure all the necessary information is completed. Again, do NOT sign in the gray shaded area; this is where I will sign the form. Okay. Let’s go on.
  • Alright, everyone must have a copy of the ATC Application for Eligibility form for Part II Professional Development, which looks like the one here. If you don’t have one now, raise your hand so that I can get one to you.   (Give time for everyone to get ready.)
  • Okay, again, we’re going to simply work our way down the form, step by step. If you have questions, stop me.   First, for “Staff Development Provider”, enter ___(your provider name here; for example “Gulf Coast Education That Works”)___ just as we did on the first form.   Leave the CPE Provider Number blank. I will complete this section before submitting the forms.   Now, if you had completed Part I Professional Development sometime before today and already submitted an Application for Eligibility Part I form, place a check in the first checkbox and then enter the date you attended that Professional Development and the location. If you have already received an ATC Certificate of Approval, place a check in the second checkbox and list your Certificate number if you know it. If you have checked either of the first two boxes and you are attending today to request approval to teach additional courses, place a check mark in the third box as well.
  • Alright, this next section of the form is your personal information. This is all identical to what you filled out on the Part I form. First, enter your first and last name. On the second line (Name on SBEC Texas Educator Certificate) include your maiden name or any other name that your SBEC certification might be filed under. Next, enter the name of your high school, and then the name of your school district. Remember not to abbreviate. Enter your HOME address, city, state, and zip code. And YOUR HOME phone number, including area code. Remember, this information will be used to contact you if there are questions regarding your form, and to mail your approval certificate to you. After you’ve entered your address and phone number, write in your social security number. And, lastly, enter an email address where you can be contacted if the ATC office has additional questions about any information on this form. (Give the audience time to complete all information.) Okay, everybody ready to go on?
  • Alright, in this section of the form, you’re going to list EACH of the courses for which you are requesting approval to teach. You are limited to a maximum of 3 courses in one Part II Professional Development session, so…keeping that in mind and using the articulation crosswalk in your packet, enter the course abbreviation in the “Abbreviation” column. For example, if you are seeking approval to teach the college-equivalent, content-enhanced version of BCIS1, you would enter “BCIS1-TP”. Next, enter the course PEIMS number. This information is also on the crosswalk. For our BCIS1-TP example, the PEIMS course number is “1201120T”. Finally, in the third column, enter the course name. Once again, for our BCIS1-TP example, the course name would be “Business Computer Information Systems 1.” The last column, entitled “College Faculty Only; Initial when Part II instruction is completed” must BE LEFT BLANK! This is where, after meeting with you and discussing the course competencies in Part II Professional Development, the college faculty will initial that they have covered all necessary material for the course or courses listed for you to be able to teach a content-enhanced ATC course. If the college faculty member does not feel that the course competencies required in the college-level course can be taught at your high school, they will advise you that you will not be able to teach the ATC course at this time. However, once you have worked with your administration to enhance the curriculum sufficient to offer an ATC course, you will have already completed the required Part II Professional Development. Alright, once you have listed the courses for which you are seeking approval – up to a maximum of 3 courses – sign and date the form on the “Teacher’s Signature” line. Please remember that by signing this form, you are stating that the information you are submitting is true and correct. Also, please do not sign on the “Provider’s Signature” line. This line is for MY signature only, which must be on the form in order for it to be processed. Lastly, if you have attended Part I Professional Development and submitted an approval form previously, please write “REVISED” at the top of this form so that the new information can be correlated with your existing information when your form is received by the state ATC office. Okay, we covered a lot. Does anyone have questions directly related to completing the form? (Allow audience to respond; answer questions as needed.)
  • Welcome to Part I of Advanced Technical Credit professional development training for statewide articulation! Some of you may already know me, but for those of you who don’t, I’m (your name here) with (your organization name here) and I am here today to provide overview training on the Advanced Technical Credit Program and the statewide articulation process. How many of you are familiar with statewide articulation? (Show of hands.) Alright. That’s great! Well, hopefully, if you ARE somewhat familiar with Tech Prep and statewide articulation, this training session will provide you with additional details; and if you AREN’T familiar with Tech Prep or statewide articulation, this session will provide answers to some of the questions you may have. Okay, first of all, let’s take care of a little housekeeping. (Let the attendees know where the rest rooms, etc. are located).

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    • Advanced Technical Credit
    Professional Development for Statewide Articulation
  • Advanced Technical Credit
    • Bob Lucas
    • ATC Coordinator
    • Statewide Articulation Professional Development
    • Email [email_address]
    • Phone – (281) 260-3562
  • Fitting the Pieces Together
    • Articulation
    • Tech Prep
    • Advanced Technical Credit
    • Work
    Tech Prep Work ATC Articulation
    • Providing
    • eligible high school teachers
    • with the necessary information
    • to successfully teach
    • ATC statewide-articulated
    • courses
    Purpose
    • Each ATC course section taught
    • by a school must have an
    • ATC-eligible trained teacher.
    Teacher Eligibility
    • Teachers must meet college requirements:
      • Requirement 1: The teacher must have a baccalaureate degree or higher in the teaching discipline.
      • OR
      • Requirement 2: The teacher must have a minimum of an associate degree and 3 years verifiable non-teaching work experience directly related to the teaching discipline.
    Teacher Eligibility
      • Teachers without a valid Texas teacher certificate (SBEC) in the discipline will have their transcripts and work experience verified by the state ATC office.
        • This will include official transcripts sent to SFASU ATC office and detailed work history if requested.
      • All teachers must possess required industry certifications if applicable. For example; registered nurse, Cisco CNI or ASE certifications.
    Teacher Eligibility
      • The school still may offer the regular non-ATC course at the high school.
      • ATC approval is related to community college faculty requirements;
      • SBEC certification is related to high school teacher requirements.
    If Not Approved
  • Teacher Eligibility No Transcripts and three year work history verified by state ATC office Yes Baccalaureate degree or higher in the teaching discipline Unrelated baccalaureate degree Yes No Associate degree in the teaching discipline Yes Ineligible Yes State teacher certificate in the teaching discipline verified by ATC office Yes Eligible No degree No No No No
  • Training Overview
      • TRAINING REQUIRED BY the TEA
      • EVERY THREE YEARS .
      • ATC PART II:
      • Course-specific instruction
      • One hour minimum per college course
      • ATC PART I:
      • General instruction
      • Two hours minimum
    • You are currently attending
    • PART I
    • of the ATC
    • Professional Development Teacher Training Program
    Part I Training
      • Understand elements of the ATC Program and Statewide Articulation
      • What are the teacher requirements
      • What are the student requirements
      • The relationship of ATC to College Tech Prep programs
    Part I Outcomes
      • Both ATC Part I and Part II MUST be completed before the 3rd Friday in September deadline
      • This year’s deadline is September 18, 2009.
    ATC Completion Deadline
    • “ In spite of increasing need at the associate degree level, instructional programs throughout the nation (and) state…struggle to produce enough graduates to meet the needs of business and industry. It seems that high school students are not fully aware of the excellent opportunities available through technical careers.”
    • Dr. Robert D. Krienke
    • President, Lamar Institute of Technology
    College Tech Prep
      • Decreasing average household income
      • Growing unskilled, under-educated population
      • Losing ground in the global marketplace
      • Increasing spending on prisons, welfare and Medicaid
    Socioeconomic Trends in Texas
  • Income Decline
  • Job Availability Decreasing 15% OJT Jobs (on the job training required) Increasing 65% TECHNICAL JOBS Specific skills-based training required (>HS <bachelor’s) Little change for several generations 20% Professional Jobs (> or = bachelor’s) Source: Occupational Outlook Quarterly, Vol. 41, pages 11-12
    • Labor Market Information
  • Labor Market Realities Source: Labor Market & Career Information (LMCI)
  • Texas Occupational Imbalances
    • More Openings than Grads
    • 1. Registered Nurses
    • 2. Elementary Teachers
    • 3. Computer Systems Analysts
    • 4. Software Engineers
    • 5. Clergy
    • 6. Health Services Mgrs.
    • 7. Pharmacists
    • 8. Medical Lab Technician
    • 9. Training & Development
    • More Grads than Openings
    • Historians & Archivists
    • Graphic Designers
    • Clinical Psychologists
    • Journalists
    • Art Directors
    • Advertising Executives
    • Film & Video Editors
    • Archeologists
    Source: Labor Market & Career Information (LMCI)
  • Highest Paying Majors 1 Year Post-Graduation: Bachelors & Associates Degrees Only Source: Labor Market & Career Information (LMCI) $27,415 BA 15. Liberal Arts $30,160 BA 11. Mathematics & Statistics $30,851 BA 10. Business, Mgmt. & Marketing **Avg. earnings for entire graduating cohort, not for individual graduates $33,276 BA 9. Computer & Information Sciences $34,167 AAS 8. Precision Production $40,120 AAS 4. Construction Trades $47,306 BA 1. Health Professions/Clinical Sciences $36,737 AAS 7. Architectural & Related Services $37,968 AAS 6. Science Technologies/ Technicians $39,677 BA 5. Engineering Technologies/Technicians $44,230 AAS 3. Health Professions/Clinical Sciences $45,278 BA 2. Engineering Annual Pay Exit Level College Major
  • Who’s Making Money? Texas Industry Sales 2004-07 Source: Labor Market & Career Information (LMCI) 68.2% $53.75 bil Petroleum Products Manufacturing 62.8% $42.65 bil Oil & Gas Extraction 46.0% $20.40 bil Building Equipment Contractors 22.0% $18.68 bil Local Government ex. Health & ED 62.8% $14.73 bil Support Activities for Mining 49.1% $11.24 bil Building Foundation/Exterior Contractors 43.4% $10.69 bil Medical & Surgical Hospitals 51.9% $9.78 bil Architect & Engineering Services 121.0% $9.66 bil Computer & Peripheral Equipment 23.3% $9.71 bil Machinery & Supply Wholesalers % CHG Revenues Industry Title
  • Student Career Interests
    • 1. Doctor, all specialties
    • 2. Lawyer
    • 3. Teacher K-12
    • 4. Athletes & Coaches
    • 5. Law enforcement
    • 6. Registered Nurses
    • 7. Veterinarians
    • 8. Singers/Entertainers
    • 9. Cosmetology/Hairdresser
    • 10. Actors & Directors
    • 11. Architects
    • 12. Biological scientist
    • 13. Auto mechanics
    • 14. Photographers
    • 15. Designers
    • 16. Computer programmer
    • 17. Fire fighters
    • 18. Computer engineers
    • 19. Artists
    • 20. Psychologists
    Source: Labor Market & Career Information (LMCI)
  • Texas Industry Forecasts from 2005 to 2008 12.9% 14,162 13. Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing 4.9% 15,148 12. Specialty Trade Contractors 20.8% 16,199 11. Support Activities for Mining 5.5% 17,545 10. Local Government (ex. Educ., Health) 7.6% 18,160 9. General Merchandise Stores 5.8% 19,569 8. Hospitals (public/private) 10.7% 48,468 4. Ambulatory Health Care Services 14.1% 75,268 1. Administrative & Support Services 9.7% 21,131 7. Credit Intermediation & Related Services 9.2% 23,704 6. Merchant Wholesalers, durable goods 10.2% 48,454 5. Prof., Scientific & Technical Services 8.5% 59,075 3. Food Services & Drinking Places 7.4% 74,945 2. Educational Services (Public/Private) Pct. Growth Net Growth NAICS Industry
  • Career Opportunities for 2000+
    • Source: CDR and Texas Education Agency
    65% 15% 20% Skilled Unskilled Professional
  • 2006 Texas Summary Tables Source: Richard Froeschle 84.0 85.4 38.6 18. Longitudinal Graduation Rate (Class of 2005) 239,716 234,198 5,350 17. Annual Graduate Count (Class of 2005) 4.3 4.1 9.6 16. Longitudinal Dropout Rate Gr. 9-12 (Class of 2005) 0.2 0.2 0.5 15. Annual Dropout Rate Gr. 7-8 (2004-05) 95.7 95.7 91.9 14. Attendance Rate (2004-05) 8 8 2 13. % Gifted & Talented Ed. 20 20 14 12. % Career & Technology Ed. 15 15 11 11. % Bilingual/ESL Education 11 11 11 10. % Special Education 16 16 13 9. % LEP 55.6 55.3 70.8 8. % Economically Disadvantaged 4 3 2 7. % Other 37 37 17 6. % White 45 45 45 5. % Hispanic 15 14 36 4. % African American 4,505,572 4,434,711 70,861 3. Total Students Students 7,956 7,643 313 Total Number of Schools State of Texas (incl. Charters) State of Texas (excl. Charters) All Charters Summary Level
  • 2003-2004 Graduates by Graduation Plan
  • What is College Tech Prep?
      • A federally funded initiative
      • Seamless, non-duplicative education
      • Participation leads to post secondary program enrollment
    College Tech Prep is…
    • Tech Prep increases student:
      • Retention and graduation at the high school level
      • Participation in, and completion of, two-year and four-year college programs
    Benefits of Tech Prep
    • Tech Prep AAS degrees by area
    • Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board
    Career Awareness Mechanics 8% Protective Services 6% Drafting & Manufacturing 10% Engineering Related 12% Health 16% Business 23% Computer Science 10% Family Sciences 6% All Others 9%
      • Provide education in high-demand jobs
      • Provide rigorous academics
      • Develop workforce skills
      • Offer work-based experiences
      • Include college credit at the high school level
      • Lead to a two-year or 4-year technical degree
      • Include an approved 6-year plan
    Tech Prep Programs MUST …
    • Tech Prep Program Articulation
    • Agreements are:
      • Program agreements between one high school or ISD and one college or college district system.
      • Consists of an approved 6-year plan outlining ALL academic and articulated technical courses that make up the College Tech Prep program.
    Program Articulation
    • Sample Tech Prep Six-Year Plan
    • Career Cluster - Information Technology
    • Program: Computer Information Technology/Database Administration
    • Specialization College: Lone Star College-Tomball
    College Tech Prep – Six Year Plan
    • Sample Tech Prep Six-Year Plan
    • Career Cluster - Information Technology
    • Program: Computer Information Technology/Database Administration
    • Specialization College: Lone Star College-Tomball
    1 Select from general education requirements 2 To meet the multicultural component for the associate of applied science degree, you must choose from these courses: ARTS 1301, HUMA 1301, or PHIL 1304 3 Capstone Course Articulated college credit courses are not repeated in college- Locally articulated course ATC (statewide articulated) course Please see ATC online crosswalk for required enhancements: www.atctexas.org/articulation/HS_Crosswalk_07.htm Data Programming N1205T12 ITSE 1445 Business Computer Programming 12031400 ITSE 1402 TOTAL Credit hours for Database Administration Specialization…………….64-65 Optional articulated credits: 20 Internetworking Technologies Non-Cisco N1295T06 OR Networking Essentials N1295T09 OR Telecommunications and Networking 1202270T (ITNW 1425)* Data Fundamentals N1205011 ITSE 1445 Intro to Computer Maintenance 125345T4 (ITSC 1405)* BCISI 1201120T OR Computer Applications 1234147T (ITSC 1401)* CTE TECH PREP/Articulated COURSES TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS Elective FINE ARTS Speech Foreign Language II Foreign Language I OTHER ITSE3 2429 Oracle Network Administration & Performance Tuning POFT 13021Business English OR BUSI 2304 Business Communications ITSE 1402 Computer Programming OR COSC 1309 Logic Design Physical Education & Health Physical Education PHYSICAL EDUCATION/ HEALTH ITSE 2458 Oracle Database Admin. II ITSE 2456 Oracle Database Admin. I BMGT 1309 Information & Project Mgmt ITSC 1401 Intro to Computers OR COSC 1401 Microcomp Apps Government/ Economics U.S. History World History World Geography HUMANITIES ITSC 2380 Cooperative Ed- Comp/Info Sci, Gen ITSE 1445 Intro to Oracle SQL ITSW 1407 Intro to Database KINE Physical Activity 4th science recommended Physics Chemistry Biology SCIENCE MATH 1314 College Algebra or higher ITSW 2437 Advanced Database ITNW 1425 Fundamentals of Networking Tech ENGL 1301 Composition & Rhetoric I 4th math recommended Algebra II Geometry Algebra I MATH Elective2 Humanities/Fine Arts Elective Social/Behavioral Science ITSC 1405 Intro to PC Operating Systems Elective1 General Education English IV English III English II English I ENGLISH Sophomore Freshman Senior Junior Sophomore Freshman Subject COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL
    • College credit may be acquired through:
        • Statewide and/or local articulation;
        • Dual Credit
        • Concurrent enrollment; and/or
        • Advanced Placement.
      • AND
          • Articulation allows eligible students to
          • receive credit for advanced measures for the
          • Distinguished Achievement Program (DAP).
          • http:/www.techpreptexas.org/DAP_rule.htm
    College Credit and Tech Prep
  • College Tech Prep – Six Year Plan
  • Program: Computer Information Technology (CIT) Mid-Range Computing Specialization * Denotes courses for articulated college credit. Courses are not repeated in college. 1 Choose electives from general education requirements. Select one course to meet multicultural requirements. 2 Capstone Course Locally articulated courses ATC (statewide articulated) courses in YELLOW BOXES Locally articulated courses ATC (statewide articulated) courses Program: Computer Information Technology Computer Application Support Specialization TOTAL Credit Hours for PC Desktop Support Specialization………….….67-69 Computer Maintenance Technician I 125345T2 (ITSC 1425)* Fundamentals of the Internet N1295T10 (ITSC 1313)* Internetworking Technologies Non-Cisco N1295T06 OR Networking Essentials Non-Cisco N1295T09 (ITNW 1425)* TECH PREP COURSES Intro to Computer Maintenance 125345T4 (ITSC 1405)* Accounting I 1202210T (ACNT 1303)* BCISI 1201120T OR Computer Applications 1234147T (ITSC 1401)* Word Processing Applications 1202280T (ITSW 1301)* TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS Elective FINE ARTS KINE Physical Activity Speech Foreign Language II Foreign Language I OTHER ITSC 3 2371 Methods & Techniq. for Trainers OR ITSC 3 2380 Cooperative Education OR ITSC 3 2381 Cooperative Education POFT 1301 Business English OR BUSI 2304 Business Communications ENGL 1301 Comp & Rhetoric Physical Education & Health Physical Education PHYSICAL EDUCATION/ HEALTH Elective 2 Social/Behavioral Science ITSW 1407 Intro to Database POFT 2331 Administrative Systems ITSW 1301 Intro to Word Processing Government/ Economics U.S. History World History World Geography HUMANITIES Elective 1 Math/Natural Science ITSC 2439 PC Help Desk OR ITSC 2380 Cooperative Education POFT 1325 Business Math & Machine Applications ITNW 1425 Fundamentals of Networking Physics Chemistry Biology SCIENCE Elective 1 General Education ITSC 1425 PC Hardware ITSW 1404 Intro to Spreadsheets ITSC 1405 Intro to PC Operating Systems Algebra II Geometry Algebra I MATH Elective 2 Humanities/Fine Arts Elective 4 Technical OR ACNT 1303 Intro to Accounting ITSC 1313 Internet/Web Page Development OR IMED 1316 Web Page Design I BMGT 1309 Information & Project Mgmt ITSC 1401 or Intro to Computers OR COSC 1401 Microcomp Apps English IV English III English II English I ENGLISH Sophomore Freshman Senior Junior Sophomore Freshman Subject COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL
  • Locally articulated courses ATC (statewide articulated) courses Program: Automotive Technology (NATEF) (AUMT 1405) TOTAL Credit Hours for Automotive Technology …… 69 AND Automotive Technician II – NATEF 12579103 Automotive Technician I – NATEF 12579102 *BCISI 1201120T OR Computer Applications 1234147T (ITSC 1401) TECH PREP COURSES TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS Elective FINE ARTS Speech Foreign Language II Foreign Language I OTHER Physical Education & Health Physical Education PHYSICAL EDUCATION/ HEALTH AUMT 2437 Automotive Electronics CHEM 1405 Intro to Chemistry TECM 1303 Technical Math PSYC 1301 Human Relations Government/ Economics U.S. History World History World Geography HUMANITIES AUMT 2381 Cooperative Education AUMT 2380 Coop Education ITSC 1401 Intro to Computers SPCH 1311 Intro to Speech Communications ENGL 1301 Comp & Rhetoric I Physics Chemistry Biology SCIENCE AUMT 1445 Auto Heating & AC AUMT 1410 Automotive Brake Systems HUMA 1 1301 Intro to the Humanities AUMT 2417 Engine Performance Analysis I AUMT 1407 Auto Electrical Systems Algebra II Geometry Algebra I MATH AUMT 2 Elective AUMT 2 Elective AUMT 2434 Engine Performance Analysis II AUMT 1419 Automotive Engine Repair AUMT 1405 Intro to Auto Tech* (NATEF) English IV English III English II English I ENGLISH SOPHOMORE FRESHMAN SENIOR JUNIOR SOPHOMORE FRESHMAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL
    • A common method for school districts to report data to TEA, including:
      • ADA (Average Daily Attendance - state funding for attendance)
      • CATE course enrollment (state weighted funding - 1.35)
      • Participation in career/technology courses (federal Perkins funding)
      • and PEIMS impacts funding.
    PEIMS is…
    • PEIMS codes are used in CATE for:
    • Reporting CATE course enrollments
      • (course abbreviations and 8-digit service ID numbers)
      • ATC course abbreviations end in –TP
      • BCIS1 -TP
      • ATC course numbers include a T
      • 1201120 T
    • Reporting students participating in CATE
    • PEIMS student codes: 0, 1, 2, and 3
    PEIMS Codes
      • Code 0
      • Not in a CATE course in October
      • Code 1
      • Enrolled in a CATE in October, but no intent to follow a technical course sequence
    PEIMS Codes
      • Code 2
      • Participating in a coherent sequence of technical courses
      • Code 3
      • Participating in a coherent sequence of technical courses (Tech Prep Student)
    PEIMS Codes
    • Impact on federal funding:
      • Weighted funding for Perkins funds – based on a district’s percentage of the total CATE participants statewide (codes 1, 2, & 3).
      • An additional 5% of Perkins funds – based on the number of students participating in coherent sequences of CATE courses, including those participating in Tech Prep programs (codes 2 & 3).
      • Districts are accountable for correctly coding students
    PEIMS Codes
  • PEIMS Updates
    • Public Education Information Management Systems (PEIMS)
    • www.tea.state.tx.us/peims/
    • PEIMS Change Documents
    • www.tea.state.tx.us/peims/standards/0607/chgdoc4.doc
  • PEIMS Updates
  • PEIMS Changes
    • 1192T362 Horticultural plant production (1/2) (HORPLPTP)
    • Is not in PEIMS Code Table CO22.
    • It is listed as an addition on change document 4 on the PEIMS website.
    • 1192T365*: Advanced floral design (1/2) (ADVFLDTP)
    • On PEIMS Code Table CO22 is missing the first “1” in the PEIMS code.
    • Is listed correctly on change document 4.
    • N122T308 Ready, Set, Teach! II (1-3) (TEACH2TP)
    • Should be deleted
  • PEIMS Flow Chart On fall snapshot date (October), was student enrolled in a C&T course? Does student have 4 year plan to take a coherent sequence of C&T courses on the fall snapshot date? Does student have 4 year plan to take a coherent sequence of C&T courses on the fall snapshot date? Code student as a “1” Code student as a “0” Code student as a “0” Code student as a “3” Code student as a “2” Has student completed at least 1 semester of a C&T course as part of their C&T coherent sequence? Does 4 year plan include: A state-approved College Tech Prep plan of study including 2 or more C&T courses for 3 or more credits? and Lead to post-secondary education/Professional Development? Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No No No
  • Break
  • What is Articulation?
    • There are two main types of articulation:
    • Program articulation
      • Tech Prep programs
    • Course articulation
      • Local articulation
      • Statewide articulation
    Articulation
    • Local Course Articulation Agreements are:
      • Course-to-course agreements between one high school or school district
        • and
      • one college or college district system.
    Local Articulation
    • Statewide Course Articulation is:
    • A statewide agreement between the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board and the Texas Education Agency.
    • A state-designed, advanced college placement program, the Advanced Technical Credit Program (ATC).
    ATC Statewide Articulation
    • Statewide Articulation allows students to:
      • Attend any of a variety of participating colleges.
      • Save time and money.
    ATC Statewide Articulation
    • Statewide Articulation is NOT
    • Tech Prep
    • Statewide Articulation IS
      • One element of College Tech Prep.
      • One method to earn college credit in high school.
    ATC is NOT Tech Prep
    • Course Requirements
      • Content-enhanced beyond TEKS
      • College-level course competencies define expected student outcomes
      • Courses = at least 1 credit
    ATC Program Requirements
    • Teacher Requirements
      • Teacher credentials
      • ATC training and approval
    ATC Program Requirements
    • Students
    ATC Program Requirements
    • All ATC statewide-articulated courses have the same student requirements for award
    • of college credit
      • Junior or senior year completion of sequence
      • Grade of at least 80% …... And
    ATC Program Requirements
      • Enroll in a related technical degree program
      • Enroll within 15 months of graduation (time may be extended)
      • Credit awarded on enrollment?
      • (however, a college may elect to require up to six credit hours)
    Standard Articulation Agreement
    • Obstacles:
      • Not all colleges are participating.
      • Not all courses or programs are offered at all colleges.
      • HS courses must be applied to a two-year technical program to receive credit.
    ATC Statewide Articulation
  • High School to College Flow Chart Student enrolls at community college Not eligible for College credit Passed with 80+ %? Sequence Completed in Jr or Sr year if needed? No No Yes Yes Within 15 months of graduation? No Yes Declared technical major? No Yes Student receives college credit Optional - 6 hrs non-developmental credit? Yes No Student completes enhanced HS ATC course or sequence
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  • Group Activity
    • Student A
      • Earns an 80% in BCIS1-TP
      • (1 credit) in the 9th grade
      • AND
      • Takes no other related career and technology courses
    Group Activity
    • Answer to Student A:
    • Student A is not eligible because a sequence has not been completed in their junior or senior year.
    Group Activity
    • Student B
      • Earns a 90% in BCIS1-TP
      • (1 credit) in the 9th grade
      • AND
      • Earns an 80% in BCIS2-TP
      • (1 credit) in the 12th grade
    Group Activity
    • Answer to Student B:
    • Student B will get credit for both courses…a sequence was completed in the junior or senior year.
    Group Activity
    • Student C
      • Earns an 80% in NFSCI-TP
      • (1/2 credit) in the 11th grade;
      • AND
      • Earns a 75% in FST-TP
      • (1/2 credit) in the 12th grade.
    Group Activity
  • Answer to Student C: Student C will not get credit for any of the courses. The sequence was not completed with a passing grade with ½ credit courses. Group Activity
    • Student D
    • Earns an 80% in BCIS1-TP
    • (1 credit) in the 9th grade.
    • AND
    • Earns an 80% in AUTO-TP
    • (1 credit) in the 11th grade.
    • (and takes no other ATC courses)
    Group Activity
  • Answer to Student D: Student D would not be eligible for credit for BCIS1-TP because they did not take any ATC courses related to BCIS1-TP in their junior or senior year. They are eligible for credit in AUTO-TP. Group Activity
    • Student E
    • Earns a 75% in BCIS1-TP
    • (1 credit) in the 11th grade.
    • AND
    • Earns a 90% in BCIS2-TP
    • (1 credit) in the 12th grade.
    Group Activity
  • Answer to Student E: Student E would not be eligible for credit for EITHER course in this case, because one of the stipulations in the Standard Articulation Agreement is “A student must successfully complete course with a minimum grade of 80, all courses designated as required prerequisites and/or co-requisites for statewide articulation.” BCIS1 is listed as a prerequisite for BCIS2-TP on the crosswalk. Group Activity
    • Student F
    • Earns an 80% in MDTRM-TP (1/2 credit) and
    • a 90% in INTHS-TP (1/2 – 1 credit)
    • in the 9th grade.
    • AND
    • Earns a 90% in HSTI-TP (1 credit) in the 10th grade.
    • AND
    • Earns an 85% in HSTII-TP (1 credit) in the 11th grade.
    • AND
    • Earns a 95% in HST3ML-TP (1 credit) in the 12th grade.
    Group Activity
  • Answer to Student F: Student F would be eligible for credit for ALL courses listed above. In this example the student could potentially earn credit for 4 different college courses. Group Activity
  • ATC Statewide Articulated Course Resources
      • ATC Course Crosswalk
      • Course Outcomes
      • Course Enhancements
    ATC Resources
  • Course Crosswalk College WECM Integrated Software Applications I ITSC 1309 or ITSC 1409 (or ITSC 1009 CEU) OR Computer Applications II POFI 1341 or POFI 1441 (or POFI 1041 CEU)
    • High School
    • College Course Outcomes
    • Business Computer Information Systems II
    • (ABCIS-TP) 1203130T
    • OR
    • Business Computer Information Systems II Career Preparation (BCIS2-TP) 1209930T
    • Prerequisite : Business Computer Information Systems I (BEGCIS1) 12011200 or (BCIS1-TP) 1201120T
    • ENHANCEMENTS:
    • Use communication software to perform common tasks either real time or simulated
  • Course Crosswalk College WECM Food Preparation I IFWA 1401 or IFWA 1501 (or IFWA 1001 CEU) OR Basic Food Preparation CHEF 1301 or CHEF 1401 OR CHEF 1200 and CHEF 1201 (or CHEF 1001 CEU) OR Sanitation and Safety CHEF 1205 or CHEF 1305 OR CHEF 1104 and CHEF 1105 (or CHEF 1005 CEU) High School College Course Outcomes Culinary Arts I (Family & Consumer Science) (2-3 credits) (CUL1-TP) N122T501   OR   Culinary Arts I (Trade & Industrial Education) (2-3 credits) (CULART-TP) N12568T1
  • Course Crosswalk College WECM Introduction and Theory of Automotive Technology AUMT 1201 or AUMT 1301 AND Introduction to Automotive Technology AUMT 1305 or AUMT 1405 (or AUMT 1005 CEU) High School College Course Outcomes Automotive Technician II (AUTO-TP) 12579T03 Non-NATEF curriculum Prerequisite: Automotive Technician I (AUTOTECH) 12579102 or Automotive Specialization (AUTOSPEC) 12579101
  • Course Outcomes   64 48 3 Supervision 1301 BMGT 52.0201 Max Cont Hrs Min Cont Hrs Semester Credit Hrs Course Name Number Rubric CIP WECM Appendix Introductory Course Level: Supervision Course Title: 52.0201  (Business Administration and Management, General) CIP Area Code: Course Description: A study of the role of the supervisor. Managerial functions as applied to leadership, counseling, motivation, and human skills are examined. Learning Outcomes:  The student will explain the role, characteristics, and skills of a supervisor and the principles of planning, leading, controlling, staffing, and organizing at the supervisory level. The student will identify and discuss the human skills necessary for supervision; explain motivational techniques and give examples of how they can be utilized by a supervisor; and structure a working environment which will provide a variety of ways for employees to be motivated.
  • Course Crosswalk Introduction to Computers ITSC 1301 or ITSC 1401 (or ITSC1001 CEU) Computer Applications I POFI 1301 or POFI 1401 (or POFI 1001 CEU) OR College Course Outcomes Business Computer Information Systems I (BCIS1-TP) 1201120T Prerequisite : Keyboarding course or skill proficiency College WECM on Equivalent High School Course Abbreviation Peims Number Course Name
  • Crosswalk Revisions
    • When a course is not offered by at least 5 community colleges and/or school districts across the state, the State Leadership Committee may recommend the removal of the course.
    • Any course(s) to be added or removed from the Crosswalk MUST be approved by the State Leadership Committee prior to any change being made.
  • Crosswalk Revisions
    • Crosswalk may be revised yearly because of TEKS or WECM changes
    • PEIMS numbers will be removed from the table when courses are removed from the crosswalk
    • If no PEIMS number is available, the district may NOT offer the course for ATC credit.
  • Break
  • How the ATC Approval Process Works
  • You will get an email telling you…go to www.atctexas.org
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    • Goals for Part II Professional Development:
      • High school and community college faculty working together.
      • Alignment of course competencies.
      • Understanding student outcomes.
    Part II – What to Expect
    • College faculty should provide:
      • Course syllabus
      • Textbook requirements
      • Software/Hardware requirements
      • Grading breakdown (projects, exams)
      • Information on job potential
      • What is expected of the students
    Part II – What to Expect
    • Ask questions.
    • Understand book, software, hardware requirements.
    • Review Course Outcome Profiles for expected learner outcomes.
    • Build a bridge between your school and the community college.
    Part II – What to Expect
  • Part II – What to Expect Sign provided sign-in sheet for each course section/college faculty Training/Overview that you attend.
  • Part II – What to Expect Time will be called 10 minutes before the next session. Please do not disturb a session while in progress.
    • Before leaving, make sure you turn in your WHITE and YELLOW copies for
    • both Parts I and II and the Application for Approval.
    • You only keep the PINKS
    What To Turn In when Leaving…
    • Teacher Approvals
      • TEA Grant
      • Stephen F. Austin State University
    • Contacts:
    • Dr. Bill Wilson, ATC Program Coordinator [email_address] or
    • Krista Guerrero, ATC Assistant Program Coordinator [email_address]
    Teacher Approvals
  • Summer 08 Conferences
    • Architecture & Construction; Arts, A/V Tech & Communications; Security; Transp., Dist. & Logics
    • Monday, July 14
    • Business, Management & Administration; Finance; Information Technology; Marketing, Sales & Service Wednesday, July 16
    • Health Science Cluster – Thursday, July 24
    • Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources – Monday, July 28
    • Education & Training; Hospitality & Tourism; Human Services
        • Wednesday, August 6 Food Production/Culinary Arts strand
        • Thursday, August 7 Child Development and Interior Design strand
  • Completing the Application Forms for Eligibility
    • When completing the form:
      • Use black/dark ink.
      • Do not write on the back.
      • Enter only your personal contact information.
      • Give completed forms to the
      • session facilitator.
      • Do not leave with your forms.
    Completing the Forms
  • Handouts
    • Application for Approval - Requirements
    • Application for Approval – Part I
    • Application for Approval – Part II
    • ATC Course Crosswalk
    • Participating Colleges
    • Evaluation (optional)
  • Application for Approval PLEASE READ & SIGN
  • Part I Form
  • 501113 Lonestar
  • Use an email address that will be easiest for us to reach you.
  • If you have the 3 years of work experience, please fill in even if you don’t think you need to do so…
  • Please don’t forget to sign your name SIGN HERE
  • Part II Form
  • Lonestar 501113
  • Use an email address that will be easiest for us to reach you.
  • College faculty will place initials in the gray shaded area if they agree on the articulation. Don’t forget to sign your name here too!
    • Important Websites:
    • www.Techpreptexas.org
    • www.atctexas.org
    Resources
  • Advanced Technical Credit
    • Bob Lucas
    • ATC Director
    • Statewide Articulation Professional Development
    • Email [email_address]
    • Phone – (281) 260-3562
    • Statewide Articulation Professional Development
    • If you want a copy of this presentation
    • Go to: www.atctexas.org and select
    • Advanced Technical Credit (Statewide Articulation) Professional Development Program
    Advanced Technical Credit