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[ ] 3104INT_3065_CO.pdf

  1. 1. COURSE OUTLINE Academic Organisation: School of Information and Communication Technology Faculty: Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology Credit point value: 10 Student Contribution Band: Band 2 Course level: Undergraduate Campus/Location/Learning Mode: Gold Coast / On Campus / In Person Convenor/s: Dr Bela Stantic (Gold Coast) Enrolment Restrictions: Nil This document was last updated: 16 June 2006 BRIEF COURSE DESCRIPTION This course compliments the techniques learned in Database Implementation and teaches the participants how to effectively and efficiently manage the operatons of web enabled databased in this case using Oracle Relational Database Management System. This course considers specific RDBMs system requirements (system structure, languages, data definition, data manipulation, security and integrity). Also considered are storage management issues and methods of storage control. Emerging technologies, paradigms and business requirements are also investigated, as to the effect they have on database development direction. Pre-requisite: 2005INT
  2. 2. SECTION A – TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT COURSE AIMS Recently there has been an increased demand in the information technology industry for Database administrators. This course provides a student with the basic principles of Database Administration skills. It represents a logical continuation of skills learned in Database Design and Database Implementation. The prevalence of both databases and web users has brought web-enabled databases to a new level of importance for businesses, as sales and various other transactions are done via the web more accurately faster and cheaper than face to face. The additional requirements for web-enabled databases are a focus of this course as well. This course complements the techniques learned in Database Design, and teaches the participants how to effectively and efficiently manage the commercial Web enabled database in this case using Oracle Object Relational Database Management System (RDBMS). This course considers specific RDBMS system requirement, particularly system structure, data structure, Database Control Language (DCL), Data Definition Language (DDL), security and integrity. Also, emerging technologies, paradigms and business requirements are also investigated, as to the effect they have on database development direction. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the completion of this course students should be able to: 1. Have a good appreciation of the role of database administrators in an organisation, 2. Utilize the tools available in a commercial database (Oracle) to carry out database administration, 3. Understand the system and data structures of RDBMS, 4. Evaluate database security requirements and apply controls utilising the inherent database software facilities, 5. Meaningfully discuss the evolving technologies and organisational requirements as they apply to the databases, 6. Understand the complexities of implementing a web-database architecture. CONTENT, ORGANISATION AND TEACHING STRATEGIES There are two hours lectures and two hours tutorial/laboratory work over the thirteen weeks. Generally, lectures cover the basic fundamentals and principles of the course topics, while the tutorial/laboratory 1
  3. 3. sessions serve as problem solving areas, with specified problems being set for each week's work. Attendance at lectures is strongly encouraged. The tutorials will enable students to apply practically the concepts presented in the lectures and will support assignment work. CONTENT SUMMARY The following topics will be covered by one or more lectures. Topics Overall structure and individual components of the RDBMS Processes within database operation and their purpose Controlling the availability and maintenance of the database. Schema refinements, implementation design and physical design Role of data dictionary / directory systems in database design, development and maintenance tasks. Utilization of the tools available in commercial RDBMS (Oracle) to carry out database administration and optimization Database security requirements and controls and the methods of designing for ease of maintenance Evolving technologies and multi database configurations ASSESSMENT Summary of Assessment Item Assessment Length Weighting Total Relevant Due Day and Time Task Marks Learning Outcomes 1. Written 10 10 5,6 Week 4 Assignment 2. Programming 30 30 3, 4 Week 13 2
  4. 4. Project 3. Final Exam 2hrs 60 60 All Exam Period To be eligible for a Pass grade in this course, students must achieve a passing grade overall and at least 40% in the final examination. The exam is conventional style, non- open book. Assessment Details The Written assignment tests the student's understanding of the principles of Web Enabled Databases. The Programming project assignment involves teamwork, with a project team of 3 members (4 if necessary). The Programming project tests the ability of the team to analyze, design and implement a web enabled database system. It assesses her/his competence in practically using the specified techniques to implement a solution to a database management problem.While it is envisaged that under normal circumstances, the same mark will be allocated to each group member of the above teams, in the event that a team member does not contribute equitably to a particular project, that team member can be given a lower mark. The final exam, closed book, assesses the ability of each student to individually demonstrate his/her competence in and mastery of the course with emphasis placed on theory content. GRADUATE SKILLS Assessed Practised Graduate Skills Taught Effective communication (written) Effective communication (oral) Effective communication (interpersonal) Information literacy Problem solving Critical evaluation Work autonomously Work in teams Creativity and innovation Ethical behaviour in social / professional / work environments Responsible, effective citizenship 3
  5. 5. TEACHING TEAM Course Convenor Convenor Details Gold Coast Campus Convenor Dr Bela Stantic Email B.Stantic@griffith.edu.au Office Location G09 1.53 Phone 555 28761 Fax 555 28066 Consultation times Will be specified on the course Learning@Griffith web-site Additional teaching team members Lecturer and Tutor: TBA COURSE COMMUNICATIONS Students will be able to communicate with the course Convenor and teaching staff at the time and place specified on the course Learning Griffith web site. All-important announcements will be listed on the course web site. This course will be taught in Mode B – Web Dependent in that all lectures and tutorials will be available on the Internet. TEXTS AND SUPPORTING MATERIALS Recommended Readings/Reference • Oracle 9i Database Administrator: Implementation and Administration, Carol McCullough-Dieter, Thomson Course Technology, 2003 Additional course support materials will be provided on-line at Learning Griffith course website. SECTION B – ADDITIONAL COURSE INFORMATION This course will be evaluated in accordance with the current School of Information and Communication Technology procedures for course evaluation. Students should refer to the Learning Griffith website for further information about this course. 4
  6. 6. Administration 1. To be eligible to pass the course, students are required to complete ALL forms of assessment and must demonstrate a reasonable degree of competence in the required course objectives as examined in each form of assessment. 2. Students must obtain at least 40% in the final examination. 3 Non-submission of a piece of assessment will incur a fail grade for the course. 4 Students may work together in researching their assignments but final submission must reflect the work and original contribution of each individual student. Any dishonest assignments will be dealt with under the rules applying in “The Process of Assessment, Grading and Dissemination of Results” and Statute 8.2 - Student Good Order as defined in the University Handbook. Dishonest assignment includes: • Deliberate copying or attempting to copy the work of other students; • Use of or attempting to use information prohibited from use in that form of assessment; • Submitting the work or another as your own; or • Plagiarism (i.e. taking and using as your own the thoughts and writings of another with the intent to claim the work as your own). 5 Full and detailed acknowledgment (e.g. notation, and/or bibliography) must be provided if contributions are drawn from the literature in preparation or reports and assignments. 6 All documentation (not source code) for assessment must be word- processed. 7 Students must be able to produce a copy of all work submitted if so requested. Copies should be retained until after the release of final results for the course. 8 Assignment submissions must contain only files relating to that assignment. Submissions containing irrelevant files and / or viruses may NOT be assessed. Files must be named as advised by the course convenor. Files must have accurate date and time labels attached to them. 9 Assignment MUST be submitted by the due date and time. Extensions may be granted in exceptional circumstances by “Application for Extension” and MUST be made BEFORE the due date. Extension Application Forms are available from the Administration Office of the Faculty. Before an extension will be granted, a review of the work completed to date MUST be undertaken with the course convenor. 10 Assignments submitted after the due date/time, without an authorised extension, will be penalised as follows: One day (or part thereof) late: 10% of marks are deducted Two days late: 20% of marks are deducted Three days late: 30% or marks are deducted Four days late: is considered a ‘non-submission’ 5
  7. 7. 11 Assignments submitted without clear student name, course, tutorial group number and Lecturer/Tutor identification will not be assessed. 12 Students are expected to spend time outside supervised tutorial periods developing skills and knowledge. 13 Assignments received by fax or email will NOT be accepted. 14. Enrolment in this course is undertaken on the basis that prior assumed knowledge has been gained by the attainment of a grade of “P” (Pass) or above in prerequisites courses. Failure to adhere to this recommendation may result in your having difficulty with the course and not being able to successfully complete it. Any additional support or special assistance cannot be expected or required if you have not completed the recommended ‘prior assumed knowledge’ course/s. 15. Any failure to submit an assessment work will only be excused by a comprehensive medical certificate covering the majority of the period over which the work was due. Otherwise an extension may be granted only at the convener or Head of School's discretion. 16. Any submission of an assessment work which is supplied on a disk which contains a virus detectable by the School’s Virus Scanning facilities may be deemed to be a non submission. This includes all types of viruses such as the word processing macro types. 6
  8. 8. SECTION C – KEY UNIVERSITY INFORMATION ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT Students must conduct their studies at the University honestly, ethically and in accordance with accepted standards of academic conduct. Any form of academic conduct that is contrary to these standards is academic misconduct, for which the University may penalise a student. Specifically it is academic misconduct for a student to: present copied, falsified or improperly obtained data as if it were the result of laboratory work, field trips or other investigatory work; include in the student's individual work material that is the result of significant assistance from another person if that assistance was unacceptable according to the instructions or guidelines for that work; assist another student in the presentation of that student's individual work in a way that is unacceptable according to the instructions or guidelines for that work; cheat; (Cheating is dishonest conduct in assessment); plagiarise (Plagiarism is knowingly presenting the work or property of another person as if it were one's own.) Visit the University’s Policy on Academic Misconduct for further details. KEY STUDENT-RELATED POLICIES All University policy documents are accessible to students via the University’s Policy Library website at: www.griffith.edu.au/policylibrary. Links to key policy documents are included below for easy reference: Student Charter Academic Standing, Progression and Exclusion Policy Student Administration Policy Policy on Student Grievances and Appeals Assessment Policy Examinations Timetabling Policy and Procedures Academic Calendar Guideline on Student E-Mail Health and Safety Policy UNIVERSITY SUPPORT RESOURCES The University provides many facilities and support services to assist students in their studies. Links to information about University support resources available to students are included below for easy reference: Learning Centres - the University provides access to common use computing facilities for educational purposes. For details visit www.griffith.edu.au/cuse Learning@Griffith - there is a dedicated website for this course via the Learning@Griffith student portal. Student Services facilitate student access to and success at their academic studies. Student Services includes: Careers and Employment Service; Chaplaincy; Counselling Service; Health Service; Student Equity Services (incorporating the Disabilities Service); and the Welfare Office. Learning Services within the Division of Information Services provides learning support in three skill areas: computing skills; library skills; and academic skills. The study skills resources on the website include self- help tasks focusing on critical thinking, exam skills, note taking, preparing presentations, referencing, writing, proof reading, and time management. 7
  9. 9. SECTION C – KEY UNIVERSITY INFORMATION ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT Students must conduct their studies at the University honestly, ethically and in accordance with accepted standards of academic conduct. Any form of academic conduct that is contrary to these standards is academic misconduct, for which the University may penalise a student. Specifically it is academic misconduct for a student to: present copied, falsified or improperly obtained data as if it were the result of laboratory work, field trips or other investigatory work; include in the student's individual work material that is the result of significant assistance from another person if that assistance was unacceptable according to the instructions or guidelines for that work; assist another student in the presentation of that student's individual work in a way that is unacceptable according to the instructions or guidelines for that work; cheat; (Cheating is dishonest conduct in assessment); plagiarise (Plagiarism is knowingly presenting the work or property of another person as if it were one's own.) Visit the University’s Policy on Academic Misconduct for further details. KEY STUDENT-RELATED POLICIES All University policy documents are accessible to students via the University’s Policy Library website at: www.griffith.edu.au/policylibrary. Links to key policy documents are included below for easy reference: Student Charter Academic Standing, Progression and Exclusion Policy Student Administration Policy Policy on Student Grievances and Appeals Assessment Policy Examinations Timetabling Policy and Procedures Academic Calendar Guideline on Student E-Mail Health and Safety Policy UNIVERSITY SUPPORT RESOURCES The University provides many facilities and support services to assist students in their studies. Links to information about University support resources available to students are included below for easy reference: Learning Centres - the University provides access to common use computing facilities for educational purposes. For details visit www.griffith.edu.au/cuse Learning@Griffith - there is a dedicated website for this course via the Learning@Griffith student portal. Student Services facilitate student access to and success at their academic studies. Student Services includes: Careers and Employment Service; Chaplaincy; Counselling Service; Health Service; Student Equity Services (incorporating the Disabilities Service); and the Welfare Office. Learning Services within the Division of Information Services provides learning support in three skill areas: computing skills; library skills; and academic skills. The study skills resources on the website include self- help tasks focusing on critical thinking, exam skills, note taking, preparing presentations, referencing, writing, proof reading, and time management. 8

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