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2002Utah6.doc 2002Utah6.doc Document Transcript

  • www.nascio.org/awards Please complete entire form All nominations must be postmarked no later than Monday, July 15, 2002. Format & Criteria Nominations will be evaluated on the clarity, quality and completeness of information presented in the following sections. Each area will be weighted equally. All nominations should include the following elements: 1) A completed nomination form 2) A one-page executive summary suitable for posting on the website and 3) A written justification containing information on the nomination in as much detail as appropriate, but not to exceed five pages (no more than 600 words per page). The executive summary does not have to be counted as one of the five pages. A brief narrative on hardware and software should be included if applicable. Attached charts, graphs or samples will be considered as long as their inclusion does not exceed the five-page limit. Title of Nomination: Utah’s State Geographic Information Database—Enterprise GIS http://agrc.utah.gov http://atlas.utah.gov/sgidmap http://maps.utah.gov Project/System Manager: Dennis Goreham Job Title: Director, Automated Geographic Reference Center Agency: Information Technology Services Department: Department of Administrative Services Address: 5130 State Office Building City: Salt Lake City State: Utah Zip: 84114 Phone: 801-538-3163 Fax: 801-538-3317 Email: dgoreham@utah.gov 1
  • Category for judging (please select only one): ¿ Enterprise Information Architecture To promote/implement an enterprise architecture framework that enables integration, inter-operability and sharing of information with other entities. This effort will help improve efficiency and deliver exceptional services to citizens, business and other governmental entities. Person Nominating (if different than above): Jeannie Watanabe Job Title: State Data Administrator Address: 116 State Capitol Building City: Salt Lake City State: Utah Zip: 84114 Phone: 801-538-9543 Fax: 801-538-1547 Email: jwatanabe@utah.gov 2
  • Executive Summary Utah’s investment in cooperation and collaboration in developing geographic information systems (GIS) data that is freely shared with all interested users has benefited the State and the public in many ways. In 1999 Utah and the U.S. Department of Interior closed one of the largest land exchanges in the history of the U.S. The State received revenue-generating parcels that will yield $200,000,000 for the State and the BLM was able to consolidate its holdings for better management of its lands. Land issues can be very controversial and decisions involve participation from many diverse groups as well as the general public. The state’s GIS helped in analyzing, comparing, and resolving conflicting options with the statewide data available to all interested parties. Brad Barber, State Planning Coordinator, commented, “Without good tools and data this deal would not have happened.” The Automated Geographic Reference Center (AGRC), the administrative steward and repository for Utah’s State Geographic Information Database (SGID), has built an enterprise information architecture over a period of 25 years. Since its inception the SGID benefited from the collaborative efforts in building and maintaining the data layers that make up the SGID. As a result the structure reflects both the enterprise perspective of the data and acknowledges the distributed nature of the stewardship for individual data layers. In order to improve the operational efficiency and effectiveness of the SGID, AGRC redesigned a distributed system for storage, retrieval, and integration of large amounts of geospatial data that would also provide for a central access point to search and download GIS data sets from the SGID database. The solution selected is ESRI’s ArcSDE 8.2 software using an Oracle database, and the new metadata services now available on ArcIMS 4.0. The metadata can easily be authored, published to a metadata server where it can be quickly searched. http://atlas.utah.gov/sgidmap . The multi-user editing features in ArcSDE allow each data steward that contributes to the SGID to edit the data for which they are responsible and post updates to the database. This process will allow end users of the SGID to have access to the most current data, as opposed to the yearly or semiannual update formats that were previously available. In addition to providing easy access to the data layers, AGRC also maintains the State’s map portal that provides a single point of access for the public to maps about Utah at http://maps.utah.gov . Twenty-five years ago an inter-agency committee recommended a centralized database management system be developed for GIS; today SGID is one of the most complete and sophisticated Geographic Information data clearinghouses in the nation. The state profile written about Utah by the Western Governor’s Association said that “Utah has perhaps the strongest direction for geographic information and related technology among the western states, established by a series of legislative and executive actions over 20 years.” This series of events recognized the need for, and caused the State of Utah to develop an enterprise GIS. Without the SGID, users could have created redundant or conflicting data. The State began building an enterprise model before this condition reached a critical juncture. The enterprise solution implemented in Utah best meets the needs of a large GIS user/client base. 3
  • Description of project, including length of time in operation Starting in 1989, the AGR Center’s (AGRC) priority was the creation of the State Geographic Information Database infrastructure. The SGID consisted of four parts; the database itself, a menu driven query interface, a set of software tools for database administration, and a published SGID Users Guide. The Users Guide was distributed to all state, federal, and local agencies involved with GIS in Utah, and provided an off-line data dictionary and catalog along with instructions for using the menu query system and ordering data. This Users Guide was also the first attempt to inventory all data available from other GIS sites in the state. The SGID was first operational in 1989 and has been providing data to users since then. In order to improve the operational efficiency and effectiveness of the SGID, AGRC designed a distributed system for storage, retrieval, and integration of large amounts of geospatial data that would also provide a central access point to search and download GIS data sets from the SGID database. ESRI’s ArcSDE 8.2 software using an Oracle database, and the new metadata services now available on ArcIMS 4.0 were selected to meet these needs. The metadata can easily be authored using the ArcGIS ArcCatalog application, published to a metadata server where it can then be quickly searched by others. With ArcIMS metadata services, SGID users can use either ArcCatalog or the new Metadata Explorer browser for searching for data. The process of converting existing SGID data into ArcGIS feature classes, organizing these into feature datasets, loading the data into ArcSDE/Oracle, and associating metadata with the new feature classes consisted of simple ‘drag and drop’ operations within ArcCatalog. Since FGDC- compliant metadata had been previously created and maintained for most of the SGID datasets, AGRC was able to take advantage of the search and thumbnail-style preview capabilities of Metadata Server. AGRC plans to use the multi-user editing features in ArcSDE to allow each data steward that contributes to the SGID to edit the data for which they are responsible and post updates to the ArcSDE database. This process will allow end users of the SGID to have access to the most current data, as opposed to the yearly or semiannual update formats that were previously available. ArcMap Server will also be used to provide access to live, dynamic data so users always have the most up-to-date information. See attachment: AGRC System Design. Web site: http://atlas.utah.gov/sgidmap Significance to the improvement of the operation of government GIS use is growing in all sectors, government and private, as well as by the public. All tweny- nine counties in Utah have developed GIS capabilities through Utah’s County GIS Assistance Program. Many Utah communities also have GIS capabilities. By facilitating the sharing of data across all levels of government, greater cooperation develops and better decisions can be made. With the growth in users and data, it was critical that the State develop an infrastructure that could support a multi-user environment in which data is easily updated by those responsible for the data. Also users are demanding current data in Internet time. 4
  • With web-enabled services, agencies are using GIS to better serve their customers. The use of GIS may be as simple as adding maps for their locations—a customer of the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control can go to the DABC web site for a map with the location of any of the state liquor stores-- or as complex as analyzing the distribution of the population based on travel time as part of their site analysis for location of offices as was done by the Division of Motor Vehicles. GIS is also being used as a communication tool by providing graphic displays of information. For example, the Department of Environmental Quality uses GIS to model air pollution and displays the results in a graphic format. Because the base GIS data resides in SGID and is accessible to all users, the investment in its development is leveraged many times over. More than a terabyte of data are downloaded from the SGID each year. Benefits realized by service recipients, taxpayers, agency or state For GIS one of the major costs is the collection and creation of GIS data; however, GIS data is also where substantial benefits can be realized through the sharing of that data. More than a terabyte of data are downloaded from the SGID each year. The costs of redundant data collection and maintenance are avoided by the State providing a centralized infrastructure for maintaining the data; in addition more timely access to data can be realized. Common access to data provides a level playing field for analyzing issues and solving problems. Easy access and use of the shared data also helps to improve decisions by providing the common framework within which disparate types of data can be viewed. These decisions can return real dollars (See examples in response to last question.) as well as improving the quality of service. Web site: http://maps.utah.gov The following examples illustrate the variety of users and applications that have benefited by having access to the SGID data. • Emergency Response On 8/11/99 a tornado hit Salt Lake City. FEMA put crews into the field to assess damage immediately. Within 24 hours the damage inventory was complete and within 48 hours damaged homes were address matched and overlaid on DOQs. This documentation allowed FEMA to begin immediate emergency payments to those impacted by the tornado. • Bureau of Land Management Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument management plan • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Map products for Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge plan in southwest Wyoming, Interpretation of various planning scenarios (statistical analysis and map production). Database creation and documentation for Refuge staff. • Ogden Valley Master Plan Analysis of development/open space suitability models Interpretation of GIS analysis results for public meetings and hearings 5
  • • Legislative Research and General Counsel Legislative redistricting and map generation • State School Districts Redisticting to create school board member districts. • State Attorney General’s Office Support of Attorney General’s office in county road claims suit against the federal government (BLM and Forest Service) Application development for rapid assessment and prioritization of road claims, and display of data in court proceedings. • Homeland Security/2002 Winter Olympics Worked with Utah Olympic Public Security Command (UOPSC), Salt Lake Organizing Committee (SLOC), SAIC (private contractor), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), along with Secret Service, FBI, and Dept. of Defense in evaluating digital data availability, supplying more current data, and evaluating GIS readiness. • State Department of Health Determination of spatial characteristics of accessibility to rural health care in Utah, based on drive times to/from healthcare services. • State School Board Application programming for school bus routing operations. • Quality Growth Efficiency Tools (QGET) Spatial analysis tools to assess the effects of various growth scenarios along the Wasatch Front in Utah. Based on varying zoning and planning strategies, growth patterns and their impact on infrastructure and the physical environment are evaluated and made available to the public and local planners. Carried out in association with the Governor’s Office of Planning and Budget (GOPB). • Public Education AGRC has been working with the State Board of Education, through the Social Studies and Educational Technologies Dept. to introduce both spatial information and the use of GIS into the K-12 classroom. In the fall of 2002 ArcView will be put into every school in the state, to be used in a new Technology, Life, and Careers (TLC) course. Coordination on the coursework is with Utah State University and the Utah Geographic Alliance. Students will access SGID data. Return on investment, short-term/long-term payback (include summary calculations) Projects must exhibit measurable operational benefit Here are examples of measurable benefits realized with the Utah enterprise GIS. 6
  • 1. Land Exchanges in Utah Exchange of state school sections for BLM parcels where revenue can be generated for School Trust has been an ongoing issue. The State owns scattered parcels throughout Utah; many parcels are in National Parks, Monuments, and Indian Reservations. School revenue is difficult to generate in many of these protected or inaccessible areas. Without GIS data and tools, assessment of tradeoffs between state and federal parcels was a time consuming process. Valuable time was spent determining what resources exist on candidate parcels, their extent, and coming to an agreement on their value. Assuring citizen involvement during the entire process was also a significant problem. By using GIS, decisions made were based on statewide data that is available to anyone (public, private, government), with parcel value and identification open to scrutiny by all interested parties. Tradeoffs and parcel delineations more quickly put on the table for discussion. GIS helped in analyzing, comparing, and resolving conflicting options. The tools also provided the means for analyzing the effects of land exchanges on adjacent areas (wilderness, development, sensitive species, etc.). The result was that Utah and the Interior Department closed one of the largest land exchanges in the history of the US. The state received revenue-generating parcels, while the BLM consolidated its holdings in reserved areas. 400,000 acres were exchanged; of the $200,000,000 that will be generated for the state, $70,000,000 is already in the bank. “Without good tools and data this deal would not have happened.” - Brad Barber, State Planning Coordinator 2. Acquisition of DOQQs and DLGs for Utah Financing the purchase of Digital Orthophoto Quarter Quads (DOQQS) and Digital Line Graphs (DLGs) was an issue of all GIS users whether state, federal or local agencies. No state or federal agency in Utah had the resources to acquire the complete coverage for Utah. Through cooperative data and cost sharing agreements, AGRC and federal agencies were able to put in place the organizational structure for the pooling of resources to acquire the digital data for the entire state. Fundamental to the success of this cooperative effort was the use of the SGID infrastructure to provide the means for maintaining and providing public access to the data. Over a three-year period, 3,312 DOQQs are delivered. The State of Utah has $2,650,000 worth of data for a $330,000 investment. Over the same three-year period, 930 DLGs are delivered. The State of Utah has $1,676,800 worth of data for an investment of $480,000 and staff time. 3. Cost Savings by Saving Staff Time Analysis by the Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Environmental Response and Remediation indicated that traditionally the assessment maps required for potential superfund sites took approximately 35 hours to complete. Today this work can be done in 1.5 hours as a result of GIS being incorporated into the process using data available through the SGID. This just one example of improving business processes by utilizing the State’s investment in an enterprise information architecture. 7
  • Attachment: AGRC System Design 8