What's so Different About Welsh Genealogy
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What's so Different About Welsh Genealogy

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Presented at the 5th Welsh Heritage Festival at Wymore Nebraska on 5 October 2013. A few things make tracing Welsh family history a challenge. Knowing about the challenges and a few solutions will ...

Presented at the 5th Welsh Heritage Festival at Wymore Nebraska on 5 October 2013. A few things make tracing Welsh family history a challenge. Knowing about the challenges and a few solutions will make your family history journey successful and much more enjoyable.

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  • Image from: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~royalancestors/castles/peverel/cardiff_castle.html
  • 1750 burials in Llangiwg, Glamorgan showing three people still using the patronymic naming pattern. These burials provide evidence for the two preceding generations. One person, William Morgan John, was old enough to be married and with an estimated span of thirty three years between generations this burial record moves the pedigree back about 100 years.
  • Records are associated with certain jurisdictions. Parish registers, poor law and census records at the parish level, court records at the county level and probate records at the archdeaconry or diocese.
  • Parish map from: https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/images/7/74/Glamorgan_Parish_map.jpg
  • Ordnance Survey 25 inch to one mile map.Image taken at Neath Antiquarian Society Archive 9 September 2011.
  • From an estate sale catalog, map scale 208.33 feet to an inch. West Glamorgan Archive Service reference D/D Z 543/1 photographed 28 February 2011.
  • Poor law union map
  • Gellionnen Chapel Records, FHL# 813540 item 6, TNA# RG4/3884
  • Membership List, Gellionnen Chapel, Glamorgan, Wales, FHL# 813540 item 6, TNA# RG4/3884
  • Membership List, Gellionnen Chapel, Glamorgan, Wales, FHL# 813540 item 6, TNA# RG4/3884
  • 1750 burials in Llangiwg, Glamorgan showing three people still using the patronymic naming pattern. These burials provide evidence for the two preceding generations. One person, William Morgan John, was old enough to be married and with an estimated span of thirty three years between generations this burial record moves the pedigree back about 100 years.
  • Bishop’s Transcript pre 1813
  • https://www.familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/images/7/74/Glamorgan_Parish_map.jpg
  • Cambrian Newspaper, 26 March 1842.
  • 1861 census of Cilybebyll, Glamorgan, Wales
  • I’m typing in the parish name of Llangiwg but the system does not have the parish listed under that spelling.
  • Margaret died at age 29 and Samuel remarried but it would be difficult to prove this with the parish registers only. The burial is on Family History Library DGS number 425322, image 30,
  • St. David’s Diocese, FHL# 1657085 showing the death date of Thomas Howell and creditors.
  • St. David’s Diocese, FHL# 1657085 showing the death date of Thomas Howell and creditors.
  • History of Y Gwrhyd
  • Hanes EglwysiAnnibynnolCymru
  • FamilySearch.org allows you to search for contact details for FamilySearch Centers around the world.
  • Llangiwg, Glamorgan parish register, DGS number 425328, image 18

What's so Different About Welsh Genealogy Presentation Transcript

  • 1. What’s so Different About Welsh Genealogy
  • 2. Similarities 1. Talk to relatives 2. Work back in time 3. Kill off your ancestors 4. Keep track of searches 5. More than one piece of evidence 6. Record what you learn 7. Share the stories 8. Use indexes 9. Don’t trust indexes 10.Same key records
  • 3. Differences 1. Common names 2. Patronymics 3. Nonconformists 4. Language 5. Place names 6. Key records online
  • 4. COMMON NAMES
  • 5. • Based on a study of marriages in Wales 1813-1837 • Insight for success
  • 6. Names John David Thomas Evan William Edward Mary Margaret Hannah Matilda Sarah Elizabeth
  • 7. PATRONYMICS
  • 8. Patronymics • Mab or ab or ap = son of • Ferch or verch = daughter of • In South Wales ab or ap was not always used
  • 9. Examples • Jenkin Morgan • David William Gibbs • William Morgan John • Evan Rees ap John • David Williams
  • 10. Pre 1813 burial (1750)
  • 11. Naming Pattern
  • 12. PLACE-NAMES
  • 13. Jurisdictions Diocese & Parish are critical
  • 14. Find & Use Detailed Maps
  • 15. WELSH LANGUAGE
  • 16. What does an American do with this?
  • 17. Records in Welsh • Nonconformist records • Chapel histories • Monumental inscriptions • Periodicals
  • 18. NONCONFORMITY
  • 19. KEY RECORDS ONLINE
  • 20. Findmypast.com
  • 21. Basic Records for Starting • Census • Civil registration (birth, marriage, death) • Church records • Probate • Cemetery (tombstone transcriptions etc.)
  • 22. Top Websites • FamilySearch.org: more than 1 billion free records • Findmypast: best online Welsh collection • National Library of Wales: the nation’s archive • FamilySearch Wiki: help & how to research info • Vision of Britain: maps
  • 23. PARISH REGISTERS
  • 24. Pre 1813 burial (1750)
  • 25. Post 1813 burial
  • 26. Marriages
  • 27. Marriages • Marriages are indexed well and serve as a good finding tool • Get your bearings by using maps – Map of the country • https://www.familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Wales – Map of the county showing all parishes • The book Atlas and Index of Parish Registers • Order one of the three maps for Wales at http://www.ihgs.ac.uk/shop/contents/ihgsmaps/ihgsparis hmaps/index.html?action=page&id=2
  • 28. Start with a marriage index • FindMyPast has many Welsh parish registers at https://www.findmypast.com/ or use FindMyPast for free at a FamilySearch Center • A list of county based indexes is at https://www.familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Wal es_Marriage_Indexes_Before_1837
  • 29. Marriages pre 1754
  • 30. Details to watch for 1754-1837
  • 31. Post 1836 Parish Register
  • 32. Some details are the same as before 1837
  • 33. Some details are new
  • 34. Christenings Christenings often show: • child’s given name • Father’s name • Mother’s name Sometimes included: • Family residence such as the village, street or farm name • Father’s occupation
  • 35. Post 1812 parish register christening
  • 36. Bishop’s Transcript
  • 37. CIVIL REGISTRATION
  • 38. David Thomas Howell Death Notice On the 11th inst., aged 75 years, Mr. David Thomas Howell, landlord of the Star Public house, Llanguicke. He was for many years a consistent member of the Independents, and was highly esteemed and beloved by all who knew him.
  • 39. CENSUS RECORDS
  • 40. PROBATE RECORDS
  • 41. RECORD SUPPLEMENTS / SUBSTITUTES
  • 42. Monumental Inscriptions Supplement other records
  • 43. Strategies for Success • Kill off your ancestor • Find your ancestor in every census • Always search both the Parish Registers and Bishop’s Transcripts
  • 44. Strategies for Success • Use indexes • Don’t trust indexes • Watch for patronymics: David Thomas Howell is a clue
  • 45. What’s so Different About Welsh Genealogy
  • 46. Basics of Welsh Research
  • 47. Begin Tracing Your Family History
  • 48. Gellilwca Fawr Old Farmhouse
  • 49. Gellilwca Fawr New Farm House
  • 50. Pre 1858 Wills
  • 51. Probate Inventory of Thomas Howell
  • 52. Probate Inventory of Thomas Howell
  • 53. Local Histories There was another poet living in the district known as Howell Gellilwca, who was grandfather to Evan Evans, superindendent of police in Neath at this time, but who was born and brought up in Betting Ganol. I remember many of Howell’s sayings…
  • 54. Indexes First
  • 55. NBI Coverage for Wales • Breconshire 5,000 • Cardiganshire 108,000 • Glamorganshire 361,000 • Monmouthshire 9,000 • Montgomeryshire less than 1,000 • Radnorshire 11,000
  • 56. Something to Remember • The National Burial Index does not include information from monumental inscriptions
  • 57. CHURCH RECORDS
  • 58. Death Certificate
  • 59. Death Certificate
  • 60. Records in Welsh
  • 61. Pay close attention to all names
  • 62. Typical 1754-1837 marriage register
  • 63. Marriage by license
  • 64. Strategies for Success • Kill off your ancestor • Find your ancestor in every census • Always search both the PRs and BTs
  • 65. Strategies for Success • Use indexes • Don’t trust indexes • Watch for patronymics: David Thomas Howell is a clue