WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT STUDY:

ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT SERVICES AND
THE PROVISION OF
EMPLOYMENT L...
Waterloo Region Economic Development
Study: Assessment of Economic
Development Services and the Provision of
Employment La...
TABLE OF CONTENTS
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................... I
1.0

INTRODUCTION .........................
TABLE OF CONTENTS

WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION ...
LIST OF TABLES
Table 2.1 Population Forecast ................................................................................
TABLE OF CONTENTS

WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION ...
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
INTRODUCTION
Waterloo Region has enjoyed several decades of sustained economic growth.
Over the past few...
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION ...
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION ...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION ...
1.0

INTRODUCTION
Waterloo Region has a strong economy that has been performing
well. However, there are challenges and op...
1.0 INTRODUCTION

WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION O...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
2.0

ECONOMIC CONTEXT


Waterloo Region’s economy is growing and performing well in
terms of its Ontario competitors;


...
2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT

WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISI...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
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ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...


2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT

WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROV...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT

WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISI...
2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT

WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISI...
2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT

WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISI...
2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT

WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISI...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT

WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISI...
2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT

WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISI...
3.0

EXISTING ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
FRAMEWORK

Despite many strengths, there are a number of weaknesses in the
current econ...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK

WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVI...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK

WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVI...
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3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK

WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PR...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
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ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
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WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVI...
WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS...
3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK

WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY
ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVI...
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
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Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
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Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
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Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
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Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
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Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands
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Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands

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The Region of Waterloo and all seven Area Municipalities jointly commissioned a study in 2012 to look at economic development issues in Waterloo Region. Malone Given Parsons Ltd. was retained to address two key issues:

Is the current approach to delivering economic development services in Waterloo Region working as well as possible? Are there any significant gaps, overlaps and opportunities for improvement?

What should the Region and Area Municipalities be doing to ensure an adequate supply of employment lands is available to support economic development? In particular, should municipalities in Waterloo Region be involved in buying, developing and selling employment lands and, if so, what is the best approach for doing that?

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Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands

  1. 1. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY: ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES AND THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS Prepared by: Prepared For: Region of Waterloo April 2013
  2. 2. Waterloo Region Economic Development Study: Assessment of Economic Development Services and the Provision of Employment Lands Prepared By: Prepared For: Malone Given Parsons Ltd. The Region of Waterloo 150 Frederick St. Kitchener, Ontario P.O. Box 9051, Station C N2G 4J3 140 Renfrew Drive Suite 201 Markham, Ontario L3R 6B3 www.mgp.ca lparsons@mgp.ca In Association With: Perimeter Public Affairs 54 Bathgate Drive Toronto, Ontario M1C 1X6 www.perimeterpublicaffairs.com Rob@perimeterpublicaffiars.com Date: April 2013 12-2116
  3. 3. TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................... I 1.0 INTRODUCTION .................................................... 1 1.1 1.2 2.0 Introduction ................................................................................. 1 The Assignment ........................................................................... 2 ECONOMIC CONTEXT ......................................... 5 2.1 2.2 Waterloo Region’s Business Advantage ................................... 9 2.3 Policy Context ........................................................................... 14 2.4 3.0 Growth and Competitiveness .................................................... 7 Growth Pressure & Opportunities for Waterloo Region ......... 18 EXISTING ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK ...................................................... 21 3.1 3.2 Stakeholder Commentary ....................................................... 25 3.3 Gaps and Redundancies ......................................................... 35 3.4 4.0 Overview of Existing Framework & Responsibilities .............. 21 SWOT Analysis of Current Waterloo Region Economic Development Framework ........................................................ 44 COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS: COMMUNITIES AND BEST PRACTICES.................................................. 49 4.1 4.2 Regional Economic Development .......................................... 50 4.3 5.0 Context for Comparative Analysis .......................................... 49 Comparator Community Summary ........................................ 57 FRAMEWORK OPTIONS ...................................... 73 5.1 Economic Development Requirements ................................. 73 5.2 Organizational Options ............................................................ 76 5.3 Evaluation of Options; Risk and Opportunities ...................... 84 MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  4. 4. TABLE OF CONTENTS WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS 6.0 EMPLOYMENT LAND OPTIONS ........................... 89 6.1 Industrial and Business Park Lands .......................................... 89 6.2 Ensuring Land Supply ................................................................ 92 6.2.1 6.2.2 Estimates of Supply and Demand for Employment Land................................................................................ 93 6.2.3 Role of the Private and Public Sectors ...................... 94 6.2.4 7.0 Need for a Risk Perspective ........................................ 92 Alternative Approaches to Providing Industrial & Business Park Lands ...................................................... 95 CONCLUSIONS, RECOMMENDATIONS AND IMPLEMENTATION ............................................ 103 7.1 Conclusions .............................................................................. 103 7.2 Recommendations .................................................................. 105 7.3 Implementation ....................................................................... 108 APPENDIX A STAKEHOLDER CONTACT LIST APPENDIX B LEGAL EXTRACTS APPENDIX C COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS APPENDIX D EMPLOYMENT LAND USE MAPS APPENDIX E WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT EXPENDITURES APPENDIX F BIBLIOGRAPHY APPENDIX G EXISTING LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES LIST OF FIGURES Figure 2.1 Waterloo Region within the Western GGH Context ........................................ 6 Figure 2.2 Economic Activity Index....................................................................................... 9 Figure 2.3 Composite of Regional Official Plan Maps 2, 3a-e & 7 ................................ 16 Figure 5.1 Development Framework: Foundations, Strategies and Outcomes .........75 Figure 6.1 Regional Employment Lands .............................................................................90 Figure 6.2 Vacant Industrial Land Prices and Development Charges (per acre) .....91 MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  5. 5. LIST OF TABLES Table 2.1 Population Forecast ............................................................................................... 7 Table 2.2 Employment Forecast ........................................................................................... 8 Table 2.3 Population and Employment Forecast (as per Waterloo New Official Plan, 2011) ........................................................................................................................................ 17 Table 3.1 Shared Responsibilities......................................................................................... 22 Table 3.2 Responsibilities Not Shared ................................................................................. 22 Table 3.3 Gaps and Redundancies ................................................................................... 43 Table 3.4 SWOT Analysis ....................................................................................................... 46 Table 4.1 Economic Development Then and Now ......................................................... 51 Table 4.2 Selected Southern Ontario Economic Development Delivery Model Types .................................................................................................................................................. 53 Table 4.3 Communities with Region, Multi-Tiered Economic Development Structures .................................................................................................................................................. 58 Table 4.4 Communities with Multi-Tiered Structure – Ontario ........................................ 62 Table 4.5 Selected Municipal External Economic Development/Real Estate Development Corporation .................................................................................................. 66 Table 4.6 Summary Best Practices ...................................................................................... 69 Table 5.1 Proposed Economic Development Framework Options .............................. 82 Table 5.2 Evaluation of Options; Risk and Opportunities ................................................ 85 Table 6.1 Region of Waterloo Industrial and Business Park Vacant Land Inventory – 2009 .......................................................................................................................................... 89 Table 6.2 Employment Land Development Options ....................................................... 98 Table 6.3 Evaluation of Employment Land Options; Risk & Opportunities ................ 100 Table 7.1 Proposed High Level Implementation Plan ................................................... 108 MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. TABLE OF CONTENTS WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS
  6. 6. TABLE OF CONTENTS WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  7. 7. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY INTRODUCTION Waterloo Region has enjoyed several decades of sustained economic growth. Over the past few years, there has been a growing debate as to the best approach to ensuring continued economic growth within the Waterloo Region. This debate has focused on three main questions:  Is the current framework for the governance and delivery of economic development meeting the needs of the regional economy?  What other options should be considered?  In particular, how can the constituent Municipalities ensure that there is a continual renewal of the available supply of employment lands? This study addresses these three questions and provides options on both a framework for economic development, and approaches to employment land development and sale. ECONOMIC CONTEXT The study addresses the current economic and policy context facing Waterloo Region, and provides an overview of the regional growth expectations; its competitiveness relative to other Ontario regions; the planning policies that will influence goals and delivery of economic development; and the supply and provision of employment lands. Waterloo Region is part of the Greater Golden Horseshoe (GGH) urban complex with a combined current population of 9 million people. Yet Waterloo Region remains separate and distinct economically, historically, and culturally from the main urban mass of the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). The region’s economy is growing and performing well relative to its Ontario competitors. Typically associated with high tech companies, Waterloo Region has several other business clusters that have demonstrated exceptional success including; advanced manufacturing, financial services, food processing and life sciences. Waterloo Region’s three post-secondary institutions; the University of Waterloo, Wilfrid Laurier University, and Conestoga College, collectively are recognized internationally for their research, innovation and talent creation capabilities. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. i
  8. 8. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS The current planning and economic development policy framework for Waterloo Region is supported by the Province of Ontario’s Places to Grow Act, the associated Greater Golden Horseshoe Plan, and the Region of Waterloo’s Official Plan and 2011-2014 Strategic Plan. The Growth Plan identified three areas in Waterloo Region as significant urban growth areas; Downtown Kitchener, Uptown Waterloo and Downtown Cambridge. The Growth Plan also recognizes the importance of protecting employment, promoting economic development and maintaining economic competitiveness. Waterloo Region’s Official Plan does not address economic development beyond “fostering and facilitating growth”, and makes no reference to a need for an economic development strategy, which the region does not yet have. The 2011-2014 Region of Waterloo Strategic Plan identified the immediate need for action on three economic development initiatives: 1- Make the East Side Employment Lands development ready; 2- Continue to identify partnership opportunities that foster innovation and economic development; and 3- Strengthen the coordination and implementation of economic development activities across the region through clarification of municipal and stakeholder roles and responsibilities. The Greater Golden Horseshoe Plan projects significant growth in the western GTA and Hamilton, and significant growth is also expected for the outer ring portion of the GGH which includes Waterloo Region. The latest projections for Waterloo Region have the population rising from 526,000 to 729,000 and employment rising from 282,000 to 366,000 by 2031. While much of the GGH employment growth is destined for the 905 area (Halton, Peel, York and Durham Regions), large 905 land banks are approaching build out and new strategic land locations are not being protected for future employment use. Waterloo Region, as the largest outer ring municipality should see considerable interest in its employment lands for office, industry and business services. EXISTING ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK Despite Waterloo Region’s many strengths and assets, there are a number of structural weaknesses in the current economic development framework. The current economic development framework does not fully meet the needs of the regional business clusters, other economic development stakeholders, and the public at large. ii MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  9. 9. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS Examples of this underachievement include: gaps in, and absence of, useful regional economic data; dated and often confusing marketing and promotion initiatives; lack of resources to deliver basic economic development service across Waterloo Region; poor stakeholder comprehension of their contribution to economic development; lack of trust vertically and horizontally across the region; and the absence of a coherent multi-level regional economic development strategy. Despite this fragmented and poorly coordinated economic development network, there is consensus among stakeholders on the need for a regional approach to economic development, on their willingness to participate in regional economic development, and that the Region of Waterloo should provide leadership in delivering this approach. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS: COMMUNITIES AND BEST PRACTICES Three sets of comparator communities with relevance to the Waterloo Region situation were evaluated: multi-tiered regional economic development organizations; existing multi-tiered municipalities in southern Ontario; and singletiered municipalities with economic development and/or real estate development subsidiaries. Results of this analysis indicate that: 1. Business success is more commonly associated with a regional cluster approach; 2. Regional business clusters require engagement at a wider regional level; 3. Single-tier municipalities favour external economic development organizations; and 4. Two-tier regional/local municipalities favour a combination of internal and external economic development organizations. REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY The first requirement for a new approach to economic development is the creation of a Regional Economic Development Strategy that takes advantage of the inherent strengths of the region and which effectively deploys resources to ensure a sustainable and growing regional economy. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. iii
  10. 10. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Waterloo’s eight municipal governments, in concert with the major economic stakeholders, should embark immediately to establish a clear and effective strategy that will create a new economic vision for Waterloo Region, and which will provide a renewed consensus on the means of achieving the vision. FRAMEWORK OPTIONS A number of viable framework options for the delivery of economic development services within Waterloo Region were identified. All are potentially implementable within the existing governance structure in Waterloo Region. Criteria for developing the options were drawn from the current local and regional context, current economic development issues, and from the experiences of other jurisdictions with similar issues and best practices. Five options for delivering economic development services were defined along a continuum of increasing change and intervention. These are: 1- The status quo; 2- Enhanced regional alignment and coordination; 3- Regional Economic Development Corporation (jointly owned by all eight Municipalities), with shared responsibility for implementing an economic development strategy with local Municipalities; 4- Regional Economic Development Corporation (jointly owned by all eight Municipalities), with sole responsibility for implementing all aspects of an economic development strategy; and 5- Consolidation of all economic development functions and services within a department of economic development within the Regional Municipality of Waterloo. Our preferred approach is Option 3, a single non-profit agency that is separate from, but controlled by, the eight Municipalities and is responsible for implementing regional economic strategy, marketing and promotion, coordination of corporate relationships, and advocacy with other levels of government. It would not be directly involved in the development and/or sale of the land. This Option would see the local Municipalities retain “non-regional” economic development functions. iv MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  11. 11. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY EMPLOYMENT LAND OPTIONS The current model for the provision of employment land is a mix of municipally and privately owned land that has been successful in meeting most but not all local employment land demand. With its educational, entrepreneurial, cultural, and transit assets and lower costs, Waterloo Region will become an increasingly attractive location for new or expanding business relative to the western GTA Municipalities. The current employment land supply in Peel and Halton will be depleted within 10 years, resulting in rising prices in these areas relative to Waterloo Region. It is an essential requirement of successful and transformational economic development that there be a sufficient supply of available employment land at all times. Our preferred approach is to create and utilize a Special Purpose Development Corporation to develop strategic employment lands on the east side, including those adjacent to the airport and other strategic employment lands as determined. Existing municipal roles in employment land development would remain intact. Over the longer term, the strategy should be to ensure that the major role of developing and selling employment lands transitions to the private sector. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. v
  12. 12. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY vi MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  13. 13. 1.0 INTRODUCTION Waterloo Region has a strong economy that has been performing well. However, there are challenges and opportunities that lie ahead. This report identifies alternative approaches for the governance and economic development services. In particular, the study evaluates alternative approaches for ensuring an appropriate supply of available employment land. 1.1 Introduction Waterloo Region has benefited from its many strengths and from its strong brand as a place of profitable enterprise, creative and industrious people, an intellectual nexus of thought leadership, a diverse high quality lifestyle, and effective community leadership. It benefits from a global perspective that is reflected in the destination of its university graduates and the market reach of many of its local companies. It also benefits from a local focus that has led to continual improvements to urban infrastructure and civic amenities. Over the past few years, there has been a growing debate as to the best approach to ensuring continued economic growth within the Waterloo Region. This debate has focused on three main questions:  Is the current framework for the governance and delivery of economic development meeting the needs of the regional economy?  What other options should be considered?  In particular, how can the constituent Municipalities ensure that there is a continual renewal of the available supply of employment lands? Implicit in these questions is: how can the Waterloo Region stay aggressively ahead of the curve and stake out its position as a location of choice for the best companies in the nation, the continent, and the world? MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. 1
  14. 14. 1.0 INTRODUCTION WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS In the course of completing this review of the structure and function of economic development services in Waterloo Region, Malone Given Parsons Ltd. (MGP) met with representatives from over 40 organizations involved in, or with, economic development across Waterloo Region. As expected, a wide range of opinion was offered on the local state of economic development, including: the decline in traditional manufacturing; the emergence of education, research and innovation as drivers of economic development; other emerging business clusters; and the role of all three orders of government, federal, provincial and municipal in economic development. Two clear themes emerged from this input. The first theme is that the region has a strong economy that has been performing well. The region has exhibited dynamic growth over the past several decades, rising standards of living and incomes, healthy local business communities, diverse and engaged sectors, place-based advocacy groups, world class local post secondary institutions, and a rare resiliency in the regional economy, given difficult international circumstances. The second theme sees a region that is not fully capitalizing on its strengths and consequently is at risk of being less dynamic, competitive and successful. There is a lack of coherent strategy and lack of effective coordination amongst the many organizations involved in economic development. This has resulted in missed opportunities, loss of at least one major company, declining national significance of remaining head offices, fragmentation of local service delivery, and internal competition rather than cooperation and collaboration. 1.2 The Assignment MGP, in association with Perimeter Public Affairs, have been retained by the Region of Waterloo together with the 7 local Municipalities to evaluate and present options on how economic development is delivered regionally through a network of approximately 34 agencies, providing a range of services at the community, local, regional and international levels. The terms of reference for the study, the MGP proposal, and subsequent discussion achieved consensus on the following project priorities. Questions that need to be answered included: 1.  Who is doing what, and is there overlap?  2 Economic Development Where are the gaps, and what improvements can be made? MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  15. 15. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS What’s working, and what needs improvement?  What is the experience of comparator communities, and what is considered to be best practice?  What unique approach can Waterloo Region take?  Consider the practical options for organizing the creation and implementation of an economic development strategy. 2. Employment Land  How should municipalities be approaching the development issues?  What is the role of greenfield employment versus infill & intensification of existing sites?  How can an appropriate supply of available vacant employment land be ensured? employment 1.0 INTRODUCTION  land The study approach involved the following tasks:  Review of the organizational framework for economic development;  Interviews with key stakeholders;  An assessment of existing performance gaps, overlaps & resources of the existing economic development framework;  Review and analysis of the economic development approaches taken by selected comparator communities;  Identification of the requirements for economic development; and,  Identification and evaluation of the governance and organization options for delivery of economic development and for ensuring land supply. Organization of the Report This report is organized in the following format:  Section 2: Context on regional economic position; planning policies; and, issues surrounding the provision of employment land;  Section 3: Overview of the existing economic development framework including regional and municipal responsibilities and mandates;  Section 4: Comparator communities and best practices and lessons;  Section 5: Overview and detailed description of proposed framework options including an evaluation of each option considering both the risks and opportunities;  Section 6: Overview and detailed description of proposed land development options including an evaluation of options; and, MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. 3
  16. 16. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS 1.0 INTRODUCTION  Section 7: Conclusions and recommended approaches, including a high level implementation sequence. Definitions The geographic region encompasses 7 local municipal jurisdictions: the City of Waterloo; the City of Kitchener; the City of Cambridge; the Township of Wilmot; the Township of Wellesley; the Township of Woolwich and the Township of North Dumfries. In addition the Regional Municipality of Waterloo provides services and infrastructure to all local municipalities. Herein, “Waterloo Region” or the “region” refers to the geography encompassed by the 7 municipalities. The “Region of Waterloo”, “ROW” or the “Regional Government” refers to the Regional Municipality of Waterloo. 4 MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  17. 17. 2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT  Waterloo Region’s economy is growing and performing well in terms of its Ontario competitors;  While Waterloo Region is recognised as a significant urban growth centre for the Province, it does not have a regional economic development strategy; and,  In the medium and long term, the rapid growth of the western GTA municipalities presents a significant strategic opportunity for Waterloo Region. Waterloo Region, located in the economic heart land of Canada, has a unique geographic position. While it is situated within the Greater Golden Horseshoe, which encompasses a population of 9 million people, and has very close linkages to the larger economy, Waterloo Region remains separate and distinct from the main urban mass of the Greater Toronto Area. It has unique history and cultural attributes that enable it to benefit from its proximity to the Toronto economy without being overwhelmed by its urban neighbours to the east. Its proximity to Toronto provides important economic and transportation linkages and an easy locational legibility to potential markets beyond Canada. At the same time, its separateness provides a high quality of life, distinct character, competitively priced economic inputs, and a world recognized quality of technical talent being produced by three post-secondary institutions. Before focusing on economic development in Waterloo Region, it is helpful to review the Region’s economic importance and the policies that relate to economic development. The following section provides:  An overview of the region’s growth expectations;  It’s competitiveness with other Ontario regions;  A review of planning policies that are most salient to the goals and delivery of economic development within Waterloo Region; and, MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. 5
  18. 18. 2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS  An overview of the issues surrounding the provision of employment land throughout the region. Figure 2.1 below maps Waterloo Region in the context of its surrounding economic competitors: Guelph; Brantford; Hamilton; and the western GTA municipalities. Figure 2.1 Waterloo Region within the Western GGH Context 6 MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  19. 19. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS 2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT 2.1 Growth and Competitiveness The series of tables that follows show the expected growth in population and employment within the Waterloo Region and its surrounding competitor municipalities. From this, the following salient observations can be made:  Waterloo Region is generally similar, or greater, in population to the nearby cities that are competitors including the urban areas that compose Halton Region.  Waterloo Region has greater expected growth in both population and employment than nearby cities and regions, although Halton Region will grow somewhat faster.  The western GTA regions of Halton and Peel can be considered as competitors for business investment, but also as sources of business establishments that could migrate west to Waterloo Region. Costs of labour and land are generally lower in Waterloo Region than in the western GTA and Waterloo Region has other attractions; universities, high quality city, small town and rural environments. Table 2.1 Population Forecast 2011-2031 % Increase 2011 Waterloo Region London Hamilton Halton Region Peel Region Brantford Guelph 2021 2031 526,000 623,000 729,000 366,140 404,600 443,500 540,000 590,000 660,000 520,000 650,000 780,000 33% 1,320,000 1,490,000 1,640,000 20% 97,925 107,258 n/a 125,000 148,000 175,000 28% 17% 18% n/a 29% Source: Waterloo Region, Hamilton, Peel Region and Halton Region Population Forecasts based on Places to Grow. Brantford Official Plan 2011; Guelph Official Plan Sept, 2012 & Employment Lands Strategy Phase 1, by Watson & Associate, 2008; and, City of London Employment, Population, Housing and Non-Residential Construction Projections 2011 Update (Draft 2012) by Altus. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. 7
  20. 20. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS 2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT Table 2.2 Employment Forecast 2011-2031 % Increase 2011 Waterloo Region London Hamilton Halton Region Peel Region Brantford Guelph 2021 2031 282,000 324,000 366,000 23% 189,674 211,630 229,337 17% 230,000 270,000 300,000 23% 280,000 340,000 390,000 28% 730,000 820,000 870,000 16% 47,685 54,910 n/a 74,680 88,790 100,390 n/a 26% Source: Waterloo Region, Hamilton, Peel Region and Halton Region Population Forecasts based on Places to Grow. Brantford Official Plan 2011; Guelph Official Plan Sept, 2012 & Employment Lands Strategy Phase 1, by Watson & Associate, 2008; and, City of London Employment, Population, Housing and Non-Residential Construction Projections 2011 Update (Draft 2012) by Altus. The Conference Board of Canada “Metropolitan Outlook 2: Economic Insights into 15 Canadian Metropolitan Economies: Summer 2012” indicates that:  Waterloo Region will achieve the highest economic growth in Canada among medium-sized cities in 2012.  The region’s manufacturing output is expected to increase 4.5 percent in 2012.  Gross Domestic Product will grow in Waterloo Region by 3.3 percent in 2012, down from 3.9 percent in 2011.  Unemployment in Kitchener, Waterloo and Cambridge is projected to fall from 6.8 percent in 2011 to 6.2 percent by the end of 2013. The CIBC World Markets' Metropolitan Economic Activity Index, 2012 places Waterloo Region as the third strongest economy among Canada’s largest 25 cities for the third quarter of 2011. This Index was based on nine key macroeconomic variables and drivers of economic growth; population growth, employment growth, unemployment rate, full-time share in total employment, personal bankruptcy rate, business bankruptcy rate, housing starts, MLS housing resales, and non-residential building permits. The Index is designed to capture the rate of change in the level of economic activity among Canada's largest 25 cities. 8 MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  21. 21. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS 2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT Figure 2.2 ranks Canada’s 25 largest cities in terms of their economic activity for the third quarter of 2011. Waterloo Region has been represented as Kitchener CMA and has been ranked third behind Toronto and Edmonton. In comparison, Hamilton is ranked 13th and London 22nd. CIBC World Markets Inc. attributed the region’s success to a combination of:  Relatively strong employment momentum;  Strong housing and real estate markets;  High quality jobs, important for income growth; and,  Low rate of business bankruptcies. Figure 2.2 Economic Activity Index Source: CIBC (Canadian Cities: An Economic Snapshot Toronto Continues To Lead the Pack, January, 2012) 2.2 Waterloo Region’s Business Advantage Many factors have given Waterloo Region a competitive edge, leading to the successes it continues to experience:  Its strategic position west of Toronto;  A labour force and consumer market of 2.7 million people within a 45 minute drive;  Ready access to major transportation corridors, and three Canada-US border crossings; MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. 9
  22. 22. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS Access to national railroads;  Access by regional transit (GO Transit) to the City of Toronto downtown;  Access to the Region of Waterloo International Airport and close proximity to Toronto’s Pearson International Airport;  A low corporate tax rate and low energy prices; and,  2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT  World class education/research institutes and a multicultural workforce with advanced skills. The region has received some high accolades for excelling in a range of sectors:  The City of Waterloo was named Top Intelligent Community 2007 by the Intelligent Community Forum;  City of Cambridge named IBM’s first Smarter City in Canada (2010);  The Tannery District in Kitchener awarded best overall project in Canada by the Canadian Urban Institute (2011);  Waterloo was ranked top 10 by FDI Magazine’s American Micro Cities of the Future in 6 of 8 categories (2011/2012);  Canada’s Technology Triangle was named one of Canada’s Top Metro Areas by Site Selection magazine; and,  The Real Estate Investment Network named Canada’s Technology Triangle as the Top Ontario Investment Town 2009-2014; While being predominantly associated with the high tech industry, Waterloo Region boasts exceptional success and expertise in a variety of industries. We have captured some of the prominent strengths of these industries, along with listing some of the key industry players. High Tech Industry With regard to the tech sector in Waterloo Region, Communitech has highlighted some noteworthy statistics;  The tech sector generates $25 billion revenue/yr;  There are approximately 1000 tech firms located in the Region;  There are in excess of 400 burgeoning start-ups (significant given a population of approximately 500,000);  There are 30,000 employed at tech firms;  There are 1,600 open tech jobs;  123% growth rate in software careers;  10 Over $0.5 billion in acquisitions in 2010; MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  23. 23.  2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS Waterloo Region is home to; o Canada’s largest tech company – BlackBerry; o Canada’s largest software company – Open Text; o World’s leading projection technology company – Christie Digital; o Canada’s largest satellite company – Com Dev;  A new startup company is established every day at the Communitech hub; and,  More than $84 million raised by companies in 2011 at the Communitech hub alone. Educational Institutions and Talent Waterloo Region boasts exceptional access to three highly acclaimed postsecondary education institutions; Wilfrid Laurier University, the University of Waterloo and Conestoga College, and their 74,000 post-secondary students. Some highlights include:  The University of Waterloo has the largest cooperative education program in the world;  The University of Waterloo is repeatedly recognized as Canada’s most innovative university and topping the categories for Best Overall and most likely to produce leaders of tomorrow;  More than 22 percent of all spin-off Canadian IT companies have originated in University of Waterloo incubator programs;  The University of Waterloo is home to the Waterloo Centre for Automotive Research (WatCAR), supporting major breakthroughs and innovations in the automotive sector;  The David Johnston Research & Technology Park is one of the newest research parks in Canada and is uniquely located on the University of Waterloo’s North Campus. Designed to accommodate 1.2 million square feet of office space on 120-acres (49 hectares), the Research Park will house thousands of researchers, create new technology jobs, and generate billions of dollars in economic impact;  “In the last four years,” the University of Waterloo has “developed 184 projects, they’ve set up 20 companies, they’ve hired 200 people and they’ve brought in venture capital of $30 million”, Geoff McBoyle, associate vicepresident of academic and strategic initiatives at the University of Waterloo;  Wilfrid Laurier is one of Canada’s fastest growing universities and is consistently ranked among Canada’s top schools in its category;  The School of Business & Economics (SBE) at Wilfrid Laurier University is one of the largest and most innovative business schools in Canada; and, MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. 11
  24. 24. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS 2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT  Conestoga College ITAL offers over 60 career-related programs, and the University’s graduates contribute more than $1 billion to the local economy each year. Advanced Manufacturing Output and productivity in the advanced manufacturing industry continues to rise due to investment in technology advancements in the sector. The strength of Waterloo Region’s manufacturing industry has been its diversity and ability to adjust to new and emerging market demands, contributing to the sustainable growth of the industry. A Statistics Canada labour force survey, produced in 2010, ranks Waterloo Region first in Canada in terms of the proportion of its labour force employed in the manufacturing industry (20% of total employment). The region also ranks first in Canada in terms of the proportion of businesses in manufacturing. Financial Services The number of businesses and financial institutions in the Kitchener-CambridgeWaterloo CMA in 2011 rose to 608, employing 21,000 people. Canada’s Technology Triangle (CTT) have noted that the total employment in the sector has risen from 6.4% to 8.5% in the past 12 years, with the region scoring second highest among Canadian CMAs. Life Sciences Life science has become an emerging cluster in Waterloo Region, with significant recent investments in biotechnology, medical and environmental sciences and in new research facilities such as the new University of Waterloo School of Pharmacy. The presence of leading-edge research facilities, an educated local workforce, and generous R&D tax credits contribute to the appeal of the region. Food Processing The Waterloo-Guelph-Toronto corridor is the largest food manufacturing region in Canada and the third largest in North America. With a comparatively lower overall cost of doing business than in the United States, access to more than 450 million North American consumers, access to ingredients and a stable market place, Waterloo Region is an extremely attractive location for food business. Planned or Recent Investment/Future Growth Generators The following recent or planned investments are expected to play a significant role in the future prosperity of the region: 12 MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  25. 25. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS The planned $66 million expansion of Kitchener Public Library;  The construction of a global innovation exchange building at Wilfred Laurier University, for students in business, mathematics, and economics;  Expansion of Eclipse Automation in Cambridge;  A $100 million investment by Toyota to expand its facility in Cambridge, creating 400 new jobs, in addition to investments in its Woodstock plant;  The Government of Canada's investment of up to $4.4 million, provided through FedDev Ontario's Investing in Business Innovation initiative, to support the expansion of a number of companies in the region. The investment is expected to support the creation of 210 jobs;  $818-million LRT project due to begin in 2014, and following developments along the major transit nodes;  44-bed extension to Cambridge Memorial Hospital, 2013;  Conestoga College; expansion of its Doon campus; and,  The opening of the $160-million, 25,650-sq.m. Mike & Ophelia Lazaridis Quantum-Nano Centre at the University of Waterloo in September 2012. 2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT  International Competitiveness “When it comes to global trade, Canada is leading the way” according to David Abney, COO of UPS which has recently invested $300 million in its Canadian operations. Attributing Canada’s six new free trade agreements along with the FTAs it is continuing to negotiate with emerging markets as clear indicators that Canada is getting it right at reaching out to the world’s new consumers. The Global Competitiveness Index 2012 – 2013 released by the World Economic Forum in early September 2012, ranks Canada at 14th place. According to The Conference Board of Canada, despite Canada’s respectable ranking, more needs to be done to improve Canada’s competitiveness: “all levels of government, all sizes of business, and all types of educational institutions have an important role to play.” The report highlights that Canada continues to benefit from a number of factors including:  Its efficient markets;  Strong financial institutions;  Well-functioning government institutions; and,  Good infrastructure. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. 13
  26. 26. 2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS The Conference Board of Canada is addressing a number of the challenges identified in the Global Competitiveness Report 2012-13 through its Centre for Business Innovation; a five year initiative that will help bring about major improvements in firm-level business innovation in Canada. Canada recently was cited as having the best job creation record in the G7; with the addition of 52,100 new jobs being added to the Canadian economy during September 2012. The Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants’ third-quarter survey also notes that 46 percent of senior executives expect the number of employees at their companies to increase in the next year, up from 41 percent in the second-quarter survey. The implication for Waterloo Region is that although Canada is a competitive country internationally, it could be taking greater advantage of that fact. Given Waterloo Region’s strong economic attributes for technology and manufacturing, it can be expected to benefit disproportionately from international recognition of Canada’s advantages as a location for creative and expanding enterprise. 2.3 Policy Context A number of legislative documents guide and promote economic development within the Region of Waterloo:  The Places to Grow Act and subsequent Growth Plan;  Regional and Municipal Official Plans; and,  Region of Waterloo Strategic Plan. The Growth Plan The Growth Plan, which guides population and economic growth in the Greater Golden Horseshoe, places particular emphasis on Urban Growth Centres and identifies three Urban Growth Centres within the Waterloo Region: Downtown Kitchener, Uptown Waterloo and Downtown Cambridge. Although these Growth Centres focus on the central areas, the fact that there are three located within Waterloo Region clearly reflects the region’s existing and future economic importance. 14 MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  27. 27. 2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS The Growth Plan protects employment areas and legislates for an adequate supply of land for employment areas and employment uses. The Growth Plan recognizes employment lands as an important tool for promoting economic development and ensuring overall competitiveness. The focus of the Growth Plan is to achieve a long term distribution of growth amongst the affected jurisdictions. It provides a normative objective for the long term distribution, but is not focused on detailed land use requirements and needs over a short term horizon, essential for the management of the economic growth process. From a perspective of attracting and accommodating employment, the focus must also be on the continual immediate requirements for land and infrastructure. This is reflected within the Growth Plan in the recognition of the need for ready and accessible infrastructure as a key driver for attracting investment and maintaining economic competitiveness. Region of Waterloo Official Plan The Region of Waterloo Official Plan (currently under appeal at the Ontario Municipal Board) sets out the planned urban growth for Waterloo Region. Most growth is expected to occur in the existing Built-Up Areas through reurbanization. In addition to the three Urban Growth Centres, which are expected to accommodate a significant share of the region’s future population and employment growth, the Region anticipates new growth and development to occur in Urban Designated Greenfield Areas and the Township Urban Areas designation. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. 15
  28. 28. 2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS Figure 2.3, produced from a composite of maps from the Region of Waterloo Official Plan, illustrates the planned urban growth for Waterloo Region. Figure 2.3 Composite of Regional Official Plan Maps 2,3a-e, & 7 16 MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  29. 29. 2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS Table 2.3 sets out the population and employment forecasts for Waterloo Region to 2029 as per the Regional Official Plan.1 Table 2.3 Population and Employment Forecast (as per Waterloo New Regional Official Plan) Population 2006 City of Waterloo City of Kitchener City of Cambridge Township of Woolwich Township of Wilmot Township of Wellesley Township of North Dumfries Total Waterloo Region 2029 101,700 137,000 214,500 % Population increase 2006 -2029 Employment % Employment increase 2006 -2029 2006 2029 35% 64,070 88,000 37% 313,000 46% 99,380 130,000 31% 123,900 173,000 40% 75,220 100,000 33% 20,100 32,500 62% 13,540 18,800 39% 17,700 28,500 61% 6,730 9,700 44% 10,100 12,000 19% 3,290 4,100 25% 9,200 16,000 74% 6,080 8,400 38% 497,200 712,000 43% 268,310 359,000 34% Source: The Region of Waterloo Official Plan Note: The Waterloo Regional Official Plan is currently under appeal at the OMB. numbers and planning horizon are subject to change The Regional Official Plan identifies its goal, objectives and corresponding policies which will guide economic development in the Region over the next 20 years. “The overall goal indentified is as follows: Collaborate with Area Municipalities, Canada’s Technology Triangle Inc. and other stakeholders to foster a diverse, innovative and globally competitive regional economy”. There are two important features of the Region of Waterloo Official Plan that are salient to economic development. The first is that the Official Plan does not stake out a clear and explicit economic development role for the Region of Waterloo beyond “fostering” and “facilitating”. The second is that there is no statement that refers to the need for an economic development strategy for the Region. The Region of Waterloo Strategic Plan, 2011-2014 identifies five focus areas as Council priorities:  Environmental sustainability; 1 Note The Region of Waterloo has been requested by the MMAH to revise forecast horizon to 2031, therefore the forecasted horizon is subject to change. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. 17
  30. 30. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS Growth management and prosperity;  Sustainable transportation;  Healthy and inclusive communities; and,  2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT  Service excellence. With respect to priority 2 above, Growth Management and Prosperity, the Region has identified the following priority actions:      Continue to manage and shape growth. Ensure infrastructure meets the demands of a growing community. Enhance our arts, culture and heritage. Strengthen partnerships with all orders of government and our community partners to plan and manage growth. Support a diverse, innovative and globally competitive economy. 2.4 Growth Pressure & Opportunities for Waterloo Region The rapid employment and population growth in the western GTA municipalities presents an opportunity for Waterloo Region. As Peel and especially Halton Region continue to grow and consume employment land, Waterloo Region is expected to experience increasing market pressure for its employment land portfolio. The success of the Peel and Halton Regions ultimately means higher land prices in those regions which will create more interest in Waterloo Region which has lower land values, within a very attractive urban context. This will be amplified by traffic congestion, particularly at peak hours, along the 401 in Halton and Peel. This future pressure on Waterloo Region is evident in the most recent economic forecasts released by the Province. While the GTAH will continue to lead growth, the Outer Ring portion of the GGH will also see strong growth throughout this planning period. More dramatic is the planned growth of the western portion of the GGH that includes communities in the inner GTAH portion of the GGH, including the City of Hamilton, and the western part of the Outer Ring of the GGH including the Region of Waterloo, and the Cities of Guelph and Brantford. This area was first identified by The Center for Spatial Economics in a 2008 report for Canada`s Technology Triangle (CTT). In this report they note that the population of this sub-region is almost 1,500,000, employment of 766,000, $49 billion in income and $36 billion in household expenditures. 18 MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  31. 31. 2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS These figures are very similar to the figures for the City of Calgary which had $51 billion in income, and household spending of $36 billion at the time the report was prepared. What do these trends mean for Waterloo Region?  The continuing shift of employment from manufacturing to service based, results in corresponding shift towards office space, rather that manufacturing space. Waterloo Region, with the only significant office space market in the Outer Ring area of the GGH, and its urban/educational amenities, should be well positioned to benefit from this trend.  Immigration will continue to drive population growth, with 94% of the immigration residing in the GTAH and the remaining 6% in the Outer Ring of the GGH. Waterloo Region is the overwhelming choice for immigrants destined for the Outer Ring. Of the 6%, 4.5% or 75% of immigration growth in the Outer Ring is into Waterloo Region.  Waterloo Region is currently the only part of Outer Region with positive inflow for workers, a trend which is expected to continue.  Ontario manufacturing output has grown faster than rate of employment due to efficiency and productivity improvements. This is good news for Waterloo Region, with a mixed economy, and a strong manufacturing base that is now more competitive, both in the domestic and international market places.  In a 2011 presentation on growth management in the GGH, MGP noted that: o Approximately 75% of GGH employment growth is destined for the 905 area of the GGH; o However, large 905 land banks are approaching build out; and o The remaining strategic employment land locations are not now being protected for future employment use. This convergence of supply and demand for new employment land in the western part of the GGH should result in a strategic shift towards private sector involvement in employment lands acquisition and development in the Outer Ring. Waterloo, as the largest municipality in the Outer Ring, its close proximity to both the GTA and the Canada US border, should see considerable interest in its employment lands for both office and industrial purposes. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. 19
  32. 32. 2.0 ECONOMIC CONTEXT WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS THIS PAGE HAS BEEN LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY 20 MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  33. 33. 3.0 EXISTING ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK Despite many strengths, there are a number of weaknesses in the current economic development framework indicating that the current system is not fully meeting the needs of the regional economy:  Absence of a regional approach to economic development;  A gap in available data;  Inconsistent marketing approach;  A lack of resources, particularly in the rural municipalities;  Trust issues; and,  An unclear understanding of stakeholder involvement in economic development. 3.1 Overview of Existing Framework & Responsibilities Waterloo Region operates under a two tier municipal structure, with the upper tier municipality, the Region of Waterloo, delivering services on a regional scale, in addition to the services provided by the 7 lower tier municipalities, including; Planning, Housing and Community Services, Social Services, Transportation and Environmental Services and Public Health. Tables 3.1 and 3.2 summarise the difference between Regional and Municipal functions, including shared and non shared responsibilities. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. 21
  34. 34. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS 3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK Table 3.1 Shared Responsibilities Region of Waterloo Local Area Municipalities Water Supply (for all municipalities) Wastewater Treatment (for all municipalities) Water Distribution for Wellesley and North Dumfries Wastewater Collection for Wellesley and North Dumfries Regional Roads (Main Arterial) and Traffic Signals Regional Official Plan and Policies Rural Library System Emergency Response (Ambulance) Debentures (for all municipalities) Regional Licensing and By-Law Enforcement (e.g. taxis, lawn watering, tree cutting etc) Water Distribution Wastewater Collection and Billing Local Streets (Residential and Collector) Zoning By-laws and Neighbourhood Plans City Library System Emergency Response (Fire Protection) Tax Collection (for area and region) Local Licensing and By-law Enforcement (e.g. parking, noise, property standards etc) Table 3.2 Responsibilities Not Shared Region of Waterloo Local Area Municipalities Public Health (Child and Family Health, Healthy Living, Sexual health, Infectious Diseases Programs, Dental Health Programs, Population Health Assessment, Emergency Medical Services, and Health Protection.) Social Services (Employment and Income Support Ontario Works, Children’s Services, Senior’s Services, Social Planning) Waste Management (Landfill, Recycling, Collection) Public Transit (Conventional and Specialized) Region of Waterloo International Airport Cultural Services (Waterloo Region Museum, Schneider Haus and McDougall Cottage) Emergency Planning Community Housing Provincial Offences Court Administration Building Inspections and Permits Cemetery Management Vital Statistics (Births, Deaths, Marriage) Land Severances Local Economic Development Parks and Recreational Programs 34 Organisations Delivering Economic Development At present, there are 34 organizations within the region that have an economic development function that is part of their mandate and program activities. At the municipal level, this includes the three Cities, the four Townships, and the Region of Waterloo. The many agencies also include the universities, college, development corporations, chambers of commerce, employment organizations and other cross jurisdictional organizations. Below is a summary of the primary focus or functions of some of the key organisations or groupings of organisations. 22 MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  35. 35. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS 3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK Region-Wide Functions The Region of Waterloo currently does not have a proactive role in coordinating economic strategies, or delivery of economic development. It does however have an enabling or coordinating role in labour market development, employment land, infrastructure, data collection, research, policy development and review, quality of life initiatives, regional economic development and integration with provincial and federal bodies. A number of functions are delivered on a region-wide scale, primarily from the three not-for-profit organizations; Canada’s Technology Triangle (CTT), Creative Enterprise Initiative, and Waterloo Regional Tourism Marketing Corporation. The key functions delivered by these three organizations are foreign direct investment, capacity building in the creative sector, and tourism respectively. The Cities of Waterloo, Kitchener & Cambridge The three Cities are involved in business attraction, business expansion and retention, employment land and community development. Their role also extends to marketing, infrastructure, data collection, research, policy development review and accessing funding. By history and geography, the three cities have complimentary but somewhat different roles. The City of Waterloo, the region’s namesake, is focused primarily, but not exclusively, on the tech sector. As the home of the University of Waterloo, and the David Johnston Research and Technology Park, it is more closely associated with technology; it is active in promoting foreign direct investment and the retention of businesses. The City of Kitchener has an active economic development focus on higher order service sectors, administration, culture and tourism. It is engaged in economic development, business retention, marketing, and culture and tourism. The City does not have significant greenfield employment land and focuses more on the office orientated service sectors that typically locate in the downtown core as well as brownfield redevelopment. The City of Cambridge has the largest industrial employment base and has been focusing on developing and marketing greenfield sites. Cambridge has also made significant achievements in creating a high quality urban character in the core area. It too has active programs in foreign direct investment, marketing and business retention. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. 23
  36. 36. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS 3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK The Townships of North Dumfries, Wellesley, Wilmot &Woolwich The Township of North Dumfries does not have significant involvement in economic development activities, nor does the Township have the available resources to engage in economic development. Interest in greenfield employment land in the past has not resulted in a sale agreement. The Township of Wellesley’s main economic development focus is retention and expansion of its existing employers. The Township is limited by water restrictions and therefore dry industries occupy designated employment lands. Without economic development staff, the Township does not have significant engagement in economic development. The Township of Wilmot has a planner/economic development officer who is engaged in facilitating employment land development and retention primarily. Most queries relating to employment land development received are for serviced lands, in which the area is deficient. The Township of Woolwich has an active economic development department and has prepared an Economic Development Strategic Plan. Their focus is primarily on business retention, expansion & tourism. They are involved in a range of initiatives to support and promote local businesses, including a business visitation program. Agriculture, food and tourism are key sectors for the Township. The private sector has been instrumental in developing employment lands within the Township. Business Associations/Chambers of Commerce Business associations, grouped to include the Chambers of Commerce, the Prosperity Council of Waterloo Region, the Manufacturing Innovation Network, and the Business Improvement Areas, focus primarily on business expansion and attraction, retention and marketing and to a lesser extent on research, policy development and review and community development. Some business associations are focused on specific geographies and/or specific industries. These organizations play a key role within the region as one of the important contact points between the public and private sectors. 24 MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  37. 37. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS 3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK Communitech Is a not for profit organization dedicated to supporting technology companies in Waterloo Region and beyond. Communitech removes barriers within the industry and provides a common place for companies, academics, enterprise and service organizations to come together on innovating collaborations that promote the region’s technology cluster. Founded in 1997, Communitech now supports a network of more than 800 companies that generate more than $25 Billion in revenue. Post Secondary Institutions Post secondary institutions; the University of Waterloo, Wilfrid Laurier University and Conestoga College, play a key role in labour market development, as well as research, data collection, policy development and review as well as improving the quality of life in the region. The institutions assist many of the other organizations in achieving their economic development mandate. 3.2 Stakeholder Commentary Over the course of this study, we interviewed individuals from the 34 stakeholder organizations, including the 8 Waterloo Region municipalities, business associations, post secondary institutions, labour force development groups, nongovernmental organizations and provincial organizations. We also met with a number of mayors from Waterloo Region (see Appendix A for a complete list). The objective of the consultation process was to understand how different organizations are involved in economic development, how they interact, how each organization fits into the current economic development framework, and their views on issues, concerns, opportunities and gaps. Broadly, our confidential discussions revealed that there is a commitment by all to working towards ensuring that Waterloo Region is as successful and vibrant as it can possibly be. At the same time, there are concerns surrounding the effectiveness and focus of the existing economic development framework. There is a general willingness to embrace change and to coordinate efforts if in doing so it will make the current system more efficient and beneficial to the region as a whole. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. 25
  38. 38. 3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS Section 3.2 summarizes some of the feedback we received, our observations, and highlights some of the key findings from the consultation phase of the project. We have categorised the findings under common discussion themes that emerged from the consultation process. We noted conflicting views relating to many topics and have not attempted to correct misunderstandings; rather the section should be read as an overview of the perceptions that exist within the region in relation to what is happening in terms of economic development. Organization/Governance Governance of economic development was the most common theme discussed throughout the interview process. There was consensus that changes are needed but different views on the best solution. Below is a sample of the comments received;  “Economic development (within Waterloo Region) is …. splintered and there is a lot of wheel spinning”.  “The region has been successful despite its framework and lack of cohesive strategy”.  The region currently operates under a “dysfunctional framework”.  The current approach to economic development is “confused and informal”. Collaboration/Interrelationships In terms of collaboration and how different economic development stakeholders interact, there were mixed responses:   “There is too much focus on the high tech sector at the cost of other important sectors”.  There is poor region-wide general business intelligence and regional approach to business attraction and retention.  Among the identified stakeholder organizations there is a lack of appreciation for the significance, and importance of their programs to economic development. “We don’t do economic development”.  There is no defined regional economic development governance structure.  Relationships between the different organizations appear to be generally very positive and collaborative.  26 With its plethora of organizations and overlapping boards, the region is “very collaborative” and perhaps “overly collaborative” in terms of economic development. “There are too many organizations”. Issues of trust have emerged resulting from a lack of information and intelligence sharing from the top down, leading to a lack of confidence in the abilities of others working within the industry. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  39. 39. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS Personality conflicts exist, affecting the smooth running of the system.  Inefficiencies have been created by an absence of cooperation, leading to overlaps. 3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK  Key Framework Responses Required:  To consolidate and refocus the delivery of economic development functions throughout the region, to make better efficiencies.  To improve collaboration, relationships and build trust between organizations.  To adopt an effective and comprehensive regional approach to economic development.  To promote coordinated economic activity among development among stakeholder groups and across the region. Townships We asked the staff at the Townships what resources or changes would support them to conduct their roles more efficiently. A summary of the main points include:  More local economic development staff would be very beneficial.  A regional point person to help navigate the system, dealing with planning policy issues and servicing related queries.  “A regional overarching agency would lead to huge efficiencies”.  There is a need to revisit the regional brand.  The greatest obstacle prohibiting the development of one of the communities is not having broadband.  There is a need and desire to develop an economic development strategy with a regional focus. There is also a desire for increased cooperation between the economic development partners.  A central source for information relevant to economic development including details of vacant employment lands would be useful. They would like to see better region-wide sharing of information between the stakeholders.  An overarching economic development agency with a regional focus is needed.  Access to more shovel ready land is required.  The Townships should retain a local role in economic development. Key Framework Responses Required:  There is a need to address the lack, or complete absence, of economic development resources at the rural townships. Access to up to date regional wide economic development related information and data would be extremely beneficial in improving service delivery at the rural level. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. 27
  40. 40. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS Some Townships feel more aligned to each other than to the wider regional economic development network. There is a need to improve interrelationships and the economic development support network throughout the region.  3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK  A regional approach to economic development would benefit the Townships. Regional Involvement We asked all interviewed stakeholders how they would view a refocused framework which involved more direct involvement by the Region of Waterloo in terms of economic development. The consultation process revealed:  There is a requirement for a regional approach to economic development and that it would be positive for the Region of Waterloo to become more involved in economic development.  The general opinion is that the role of the Region of Waterloo should not take away from the role of the municipalities and townships in providing local economic development services.  There is a view that increased involvement by the Region of Waterloo would create efficiencies and speedup processes, particularly in terms of bringing employment land to a shovel ready state. A number of different suggested responsibilities emerged in terms of the Region of Waterloo’s involvement in employment land development including:   “The Region should support communities to get land to a shovel ready state and let the local municipalities and townships take care of the rest”.  Some suggested that there is a requirement for the Region to purchase and manage strategically important employment lands, including lands located close to and around the airport, to accommodate and safe guard the future viability of the region.  Some questioned whether there should be a stronger role for the private sector.  That a “champion” could be employed at the Region of Waterloo, who would coordinate regional economic development activities and get employment lands moving.  Preparation of a regional economic development strategy.  28 The Region of Waterloo should retain its current status of servicing employment lands, but there is a need to speed up the process, ensure that there is enough available employment land, and cut down on the bureaucracy. Collator and coordinator of data and research. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  41. 41. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS There was support, by some, for the creation of an economic development department at the Region of Waterloo with the Region of Waterloo providing a full service economic development role. This idea has also been resisted by some of the participants who feel that economic development should remain a service that is provided at a local level.  There was general consensus that there needed to be more coordination of economic development efforts across the region.  A regional point person could be identified at the Region of Waterloo to help navigate the system, particularly in terms of employment land development and in supporting the local municipalities.  There was also concern, by some, that if the role of the Region was expanded into providing a full range of economic development services, this could reduce the independence of the area municipalities and could be seen as a move to defacto amalgamation. 3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK  Key Framework Responses Required:  To establish an appropriate economic development role for the Region of Waterloo.  To review the roles of the other stakeholder organizations in light of increased Region of Waterloo involvement in economic development.  To be mindful of the political complexities. An Expanded Role for Canada’s Technology Triangle The current and future role of Canada’s Technology Triangle (CTT) was a topic of discussion in many of our meetings. There were contradictory observations in terms of the current and envisaged future role of CTT:  “CTT should narrow their focus and stick specifically to FDI, fine tune its strategy in terms of where their focus lies and continue to promote the region abroad”.  “The role of CTT should be expanded to include other economic development functions” including; conducting research and acting as a coordinator of data, taking control of regional tourism with some proposing that CTT would be the most suitable existing organization to rebrand and refocus to offer a full service economic development service.  There is confusion surrounding the role and mandate of CTT. In many cases there was an expectation that CTT should be providing additional services outside of its current mandate.  Conflicting views surrounding its achievements to date. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. 29
  42. 42. 3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS Key Framework Responses Required:  There is a need for clarity surrounding the role and mandate of CTT. New Overarching Regional Economic Development Organization/Development Corporation There was significant support for a new organization to guide regional economic development in Waterloo Region.  Some felt that a new organization was required that would be independent of the Region of Waterloo, the Municipalities or CTT.  Such an organization would have a multidisciplinary focus, and be responsible for all or a select number of economic development functions including; marketing, strategy development, data collection and research, tourism and land development. The opposing argument was that there are already too many organizations with an economic development focus, and that adding an additional organization would not be beneficial. It was suggested by some that the CTT itself could be expanded to take on a broader role. Key Framework Responses Required:  Consideration to be given to effective mechanisms to establish and coordinate the implementation of a regional economic development strategy.  Consideration to be given to the formation of an independent organization to lead economic development across the region. Marketing/Branding Issues surrounding marketing and branding were a significant part of the discussions with all stakeholders. Our discussions revealed: Branding  There is confusion surrounding the brand and there is little association with the brand “Canada’s Technology Triangle”.  “There is a need for a refocus and rebranding”.  “The regional brand may not be as strong as perceived”.  “Education and talent could become more implicit in the branding”. Marketing   30 There is a demand for a regional marketing and communications strategy. There is a need to establish responsibility for finding, storing and coordinating relevant data on a regional scale and for marketing the region. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  43. 43.  3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS Some areas in the region currently do not have broadband access. Key Framework Responses Required:  There is a need to refresh and refocus the regional brand.  A comprehensive regional economic development strategy should include a comprehensive marketing and communications strategy.  There is a need to establish responsibility for finding, storing and coordinating relevant data on a regional scale and for marketing the region.  Marketing material is outdated; it should reflect a technologically advanced community. Data/Information Sharing In many cases, a lack of accessible region-wide economic development and marketing data was identified as a primary obstacle to effective delivery of economic development services. Our key observations include:  Suspicions, knowledge gaps and inefficiencies have developed as a result of a lack of openness with regard to information sharing and a lack of a common information base.  There is no central generator, collator and repository for accessible relevant regional data and economic research.  Organizations are producing useful information that is not readily available or being dispersed throughout the economic development community. Key Framework Responses Required:  A centrally managed regionally focused data source, freely accessible to all, would be beneficial to all parties including staff, the public, existing and potential businesses. Strategy Many stakeholders agreed that there is a need for a comprehensive regional economic development strategy. In developing the strategy there has been an appeal to:  Expand the regions focus beyond the technology sector and to consider other significant industries.  Consider the development of sector specific strategies as part of the overarching economic development strategy.  Celebrate the differences between the cities and townships, and to encourage some degree of local competition. Key Framework Responses Required:  Development of a comprehensive regional economic development strategy. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. 31
  44. 44. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS 3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK  Development of a comprehensive regional economic development strategy. Employment Land For stakeholders who have involvement or who have an interest in employment lands, there were some key messages:  The most widely identified obstacle to employment land development is a lengthy planning approvals process; “It takes too long to get land to a shovel ready state”.  The cost of servicing lands has been highlighted as a limiting factor.  The adopted employment land development strategy is short term. There is no mechanism to accommodate for a rolling supply of readily available employment lands.  There is confusion generally surrounding how much employment land is actually useable, i.e. for sale or lease and are shovel ready as opposed to those that are notionally available.  There is a lack of long term strategic thinking in terms of development of regionally significant parcels of land, the lands surrounding the airport for example.  It has been suggested that the private sector is intimidated by the power of the public sector with regard to employment land development, which has kept them largely out of the business. We spoke to a realtor who suggested that “if the Region and municipalities concentrated on ensuring that employment lands are serviced and shovel ready the rest would take care of itself”.  It was argued that the Countryside Line should be revised, that the current restrictions are impractical and inhibits development. Key Framework Responses Required:   There is a need to think strategically about land and what is best for the long term viability and success of the region.  There is a need to find a balance between the needs of planning and the need to ensure an adequate supply of land at all times.  There is an opportunity to review the method of measuring development charges.  32 Need to establish and maintain a registry of employment lands for the entire region which captures all relevant information pertaining to the lands; which lands are serviced, vacant, shovel ready, for sale, size of parcels, zoning etc. The line between public and private sector involvement in employment land development must be clear. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  45. 45. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS 3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK Business Retention, Outreach & Development In terms of business retention, outreach and development, feedback and our general observations revealed:  Municipalities are rolling out a business visitation program but there appears to be a lack of commitment by some to fulfill their responsibilities with regard to the program.  In the rural Townships, a lack of resources makes it difficult for staff to engage fully in retention activities.  There is an unstructured, unclear approach to retention in relation to companies with a region-wide scope.  There is a lack of general business intelligence; there is no regular assessment of needs and issues. The current process is reactionary rather that proactive.  In terms of recent investment losses throughout the region, it would appear that there was a lack of coordination, that assumptions were made about what businesses were planning to do rather than basing actions on fact, that responses were slow and confused, and perhaps “unprofessional”. Key Framework Responses Required:  There is a need for a more organized program of outreach, with specific mandates, processes and outcomes.  A professional approach to corporate relationship management needs to be instituted.  A differentiation is required between local retention activities and a regionally orientated strategic corporate relationship program.  Better regional coordination. Talent Through the consultation process it emerged that:  Recognition exists throughout the region of the importance of implementing initiatives to attract and retain talented professionals.  There is acknowledgement of the central role that the second level institutions play in supporting existing and new businesses.  Improving the downtowns, transit and overall livability of the region is considered essential for talent attraction and retention. Key Framework Responses Required:  A talent attraction and retention strategy is currently being developed within the region. This strategy should link to an overarching regional economic development strategy. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. 33
  46. 46. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS 3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK Performance Measures An absence of performance indicators across the stakeholder organizations has led to:  Assumptions and a lack of appreciation for the value of work done by others, resulting in trust and confidence issues.  Overlaps and gaps not being measured or addressed. Key Framework Responses Required:   Lack of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for all stakeholders within the region involved in economic development creates uncertainty about value for money and is necessary for the management and implementation of a strategy.  Performance indicators should be relevant to the organization’s mandate and should be measured in terms of outputs not inputs.  34 A periodic review and evaluation of all organizations would ensure optimal value for money. A common set of KPIs for all organizations (where practical) would streamline the process and clearly and easily show where there are inefficiencies. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  47. 47. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS 3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK 3.3 Gaps & Redundancies General Observations & Analysis There is an evident difference in service delivery within the three Cities and an even larger difference between the range of service delivery provided by the Cities to that provided by the Townships, highlighting a lack of consistency across the region, varying degrees of service delivery from one jurisdiction to the next, and limited resources in some areas. The diverse nature of the various Cities and Townships in terms of scale, attributes, and economic development focus means that there is not a requirement for all services to be provided to the same degree across the region, however a lack of consistency and clarity surrounding functions, roles and responsibilities makes it more cumbersome for those accessing services from a number of the Cities and or Townships. There is no one organization delivering, enabling or contributing to all economic development functions, either at the local or regional level. Our consultation revealed that there is a need and support for a regionally focused organization to provide a cross section of economic development functions. We have identified 21 organizations that are providing one or more region-wide economic development functions and that 12 of the 14 functions are being delivered to a degree (the service may be narrow in focus) with a regional focus. Employment land development and economic policy development are the exceptions, with no organization tasked with primary regional responsibility for either. There are overlaps in terms of the number of organizations providing an element of the same function at a regional level; however that is not to say that the exact service is being duplicated. In terms of service delivery provided by the cities and townships, the most notable gap is limited economic development resources at the Township of North Dumfries and the Township of Wellesley, who have no specific economic development budget or economic development staffing resources. The planner at the Township of Wellesley currently accesses supports relating to economic development from planning staff at the Region of Waterloo and engage in economic development networking activities. The Township of North Dumfries does not have the resources to engage in economic development activities. There is a requirement to address this resourcing gap. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. 35
  48. 48. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS 3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK Business Attraction/Development, Expansion and Retention Business attraction and retention is the function with the largest number of stakeholder organizations involved across the 14 identified functions. Three organizations have been identified as having a primary regional role in business attraction and retention as part of their overall mandate within their defined sectors. However there is no organization mandated to oversee business attraction and retention across the region and across a broad range of sectors. A more assertive and effective approach to corporate relationship management is required. This will provide employers with designated “advocates” within the economic development system. It will also help to ensure that business intelligence on potential needs, expectations, services, and growth facilitation is improved. Labour Market Development The labour market development function is delivered by a cross section of organizations including; all of the identified labour force development organizations, the post-secondary institutions, Communitech, and the Manufacturing Innovation Network. Other organizations play an enabling role in labour market development. There does not appear to be any gaps in terms of the delivery of the labour market development function. Waterloo Region adopts a proactive approach to labour market development through its training, research, initiatives and supports. Talent attraction and retention is a significant component in providing for a successful and diverse economy. A talent and labour market development strategy should therefore form part of a wider regional economic development strategy. Foreign Direct Investment Foreign direct investment is the primary responsibility of Canada’s Technology Triangle (CTT). The Department of International Affairs and Foreign Trade who have offices in Waterloo Region also play a significant role in foreign direct investment and have close relations with CTT and their work. In terms of gaps and foreign direct investment, branding of the region as Canada’s Technology Triangle raises issues for a number of the stakeholder organizations. There is a need to refocus the branding of the region to broaden the spectrum of strengths and potential investment opportunities within the region. There is also a need to ensure that a cross-section of industries is being promoted abroad as there is a perception that the technology sector gets the majority of attention. 36 MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  49. 49. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS 3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK Sector/Cluster Development Waterloo Region is synonymous with technology due to a significant effort by a broad range of organizations to support and promote the industry. Cluster development has proven to be hugely successful, particularly in terms of the technology sector. The networks that are formed through clustering activities ground the companies to the region and facilitate the growth of the industry. The work of Communitech in supporting the technology sector has had hugely significant implications for the region. CTT and the University of Waterloo along with others have also contributed significantly to the growth of the industry. The City of Kitchener has recognized the significance of development of new economic clusters and focuses on the promotion of arts and culture, clean technology, digital media, education and knowledge creation and life science clusters. OMAFRA support and promote the growth of the agriculture and food industries across Southern Ontario. The Manufacturing Innovation Network supports the manufacturing industry through an online networking service that is national in scope. Cluster development initiatives are an important new direction in economic policy in supporting industries to grow in strength and size. Research indicates that industries participating in a strong cluster register higher employment growth as well as higher growth of wages, number of establishments, and patenting. Industry and cluster level growth also increases with the strength of related clusters in the region and with the strength of similar clusters in adjacent regions. Findings also suggest that new industries emerge where there is a strong cluster environment. There is therefore merit in expanding the regional cluster development approach and to incorporate the strategy into policy and an effective economic development program. Employment Land & Infrastructure Employment land development is currently being facilitated in varying degrees by the Municipalities. The Cities in particular are the primary suppliers of industrial and business park lands. They have responsibility for the designation and zoning of specific lands to accommodate forecasted employment growth and the provision of local infrastructure (water, sewers, and local roads) directly required to provide for the development of employment lands. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. 37
  50. 50. 3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS While the Townships assist in bringing employment lands on-stream, they rely predominantly on the private sector to provide land for employment growth, which has been a beneficial strategy, particularly in the case of the south Elmira Industrial Area, where the private sector has over the past several years been very successful in bringing employment land on to the market. Under the current framework the Region of Waterloo does not have a mandate to be directly involved in employment land development. The Region does however play an enabling role through the provision of major infrastructure (water capacity, treatment and mains, wastewater treatment capacity, and regional roads) directly required to provide for the development of employment lands; by designating employment lands in the Regional Official Plan; development approvals; and lobbying of the Provincial and Federal governments to provide funding for infrastructure. In terms of gaps, there is no long term strategic regional focus on employment land development that is consistent with a regional economic development strategy. Without a region wide mandated organization, investors seeking to locate within the region may need to research and negotiate with a number of the municipalities/townships rather than dealing with one organization who can advise on all prospective site locations. There is also inter-municipal competition in terms of securing investors and employers to employment lands. While some level of competition can be good, there needs to be a strong regional perspective advanced for marketing and attracting potential employers. Marketing Under the current framework structure, marketing is being delivered at some level by many of the organizations. However the scope of the marketing tends to be locally orientated, specific to the organization, on a sectoral basis or limited in nature. CTT markets the region under its foreign direct investment mandate; however this focusses on a limited number of industries. Communitech plays an important role in marketing the region as a technology cluster; and the Universities and College play their part in marketing the region as an education center. However in terms of economic development, there is no overarching marketing strategy and no organization with a broad regional marketing approach. Marketing of the region was one of the primary topics of discussion throughout our consultation process and in particular the need for an up-to-date, region-wide, accurate and modern approach to marketing the area. There is an evident need for a strategic regional marketing strategy. 38 MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.
  51. 51. WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS 3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK Tourism, Arts & Culture The tourism, arts and culture sectors are well serviced throughout the region. The sectors are tied in varying degrees to economic development in the various Cities and Townships. On a regional scale, tourism is promoted by the Waterloo Region Tourism Marketing Corporation who maintains the Explore Waterloo Region website and is linked to the cities and township websites. The City of Kitchener has a particular focus on linking tourism, arts and cultural to economic development and has invested significantly in adding value to these sectors. The City of Kitchener promote arts and culture as a competitive cluster sector and strive to become the arts and culture hub of the region. The Cambridge Chamber of Commerce in partnership with the City of Cambridge operates Cambridge Tourism. It is the mission of the Chamber to develop tourism initiatives and to build partnerships that pool ideas and resources to promote Cambridge as a viable travel destination. The Township of Woolwich are actively involved in tourism promotion and operate a visitor information centre to compliment two other visitor information centres operating within the Woolwich area. The Creative Enterprise Initiative aim to provide an arts portal for up to date information relating to; arts activities, events and initiatives throughout the region. Data Collection & Research While some of the local Municipalities collect economic development data at the local level, there is a gap in available economic development relevant data at the region wide scale. The Waterloo Region Collaborative Economic Research Group (WRCERG) was formed in 2011 to address a gap in available economic research and data. The group is working towards creating its own website and members pay a fee to purchase data. While this is a positive step towards addressing a gap, the data is not freely accessible by all. The group will become increasingly involved in producing reports based on the data, which will be freely available. This still leaves a gap in freely accessible regional economic development data. In terms of information relating to availability of employment lands, some Municipalities keep a register, however the information is not maintained on an on-going basis. Therefore there is no available up-to-date data on regional employment land availability. A lack of available up-to-date relevant economic development data for the region was highlighted as one of the most significant gaps that we identified through our consultations with the stakeholders. MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD. 39
  52. 52. 3.0 EXISTING FRAMEWORK WATERLOO REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES & THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT LANDS From our discussions, stakeholders revealed that a central data repository with accessible, up-to-date, accurate, region wide data would lead to huge efficiencies. There is also a need for general business intelligence data gathering. In terms of region-wide economic development research, there appears to be a gap in on-going research relating to economic development. In changing economic circumstances, the economic stakeholders of the region have recognised the need for intelligence on where the region sits in terms of its competition, where markets are evolving, where there are new opportunities, and where the region should be focusing its efforts. There is value in measuring and analysing performance, and the impacts, effects and opportunities of initiatives, programs, and funding. Efficiencies can be made and opportunities maximised. There is a requirement for on-going research on economic development trends and analysis of how existing and potential programs, investments, initiatives and models have, and can, impact the economic viability of the region. This information should be shared across all levels and sectors and should feed into policy development, infrastructure plans and strategies for improving and positioning the region at its best. The WRCERG may have a role in fulfilling the above requirements. Economic Policy Development Economic development policy is developed at the local and regional level through the Municipalities and the Region of Waterloo. However there is no Municipality or agency that is charged with the responsibility of creating and implementing a region wide economic development strategy. For external users accessing economic development policy and land use mapping in particular, there is inconsistency in terms of terminology and colour coding. Consideration should be given to streamlining land use mapping across the region for simplification purposes for the general public. Should a regional economic development strategy be developed, there needs to be an institutional response which supports the delivery and preservation of the strategy. 40 MALONE GIVEN PARSONS LTD.

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