The Biophilic City Flinders

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The Biophilic City Flinders

  1. 1. The Biophilic City Concept Developing Sustainable Societies: Challenges and Perspectives Flinders University 23 rd March 2011 Darren Bilsborough, Director of Sustainability A-P Adjunct Professor of Sustainability, Curtin University
  2. 2. More potential problems than you can poke a stick at relating to:- City Vulnerability Identifying the issues <ul><li>Climate Change </li></ul><ul><li>Global Population and Consumption </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Leading to Resource Depletion and;- </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Peak Oil </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Peak Water </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Peak Food </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Pollution (air, water and soil) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Health and Well Being (future liabilities) </li></ul>
  3. 3. 1981 – 2005: global GDP more than doubled, but 60% of world’s ecosystems degraded/exploited unsustainably
  4. 4. Future Health Liability Future Health Liability – Unfunded Health Budgets
  5. 5. PB-CUSP Alliance Research Costs to government $86 million (or approximately $80,000 per block) – or the cost to provide power, water, sewerage, schools, hospitals and local government services for fringe developments. Road infrastructure is the most significant cost. Cost to people $250 million in transport costs over 50 years – people in fringe developments drive more frequently and own more cars $ 4.23 million in health costs – people in fringe developments have higher risk of obesity related to lower levels of physical activity for people. Cost to the planet 4,400 tons of greenhouse gas is saved for 1,000 urban dwellings, which is roughly equal to the amount emitted from 200 homes – an estimated dollar value of approximately $19.32 million. Productivity Opportunity A 6% improvement in productivity due to active travel Lifestyle. PB-CUSP Alliance Research
  6. 6. Peak Oil Peak Oil
  7. 7. Sprawling Places Are More Expensive
  8. 8. How Much Time Have We Got? Some future scenarios have petrol prices at up to $8/litre in Australia. Even modest scenarios foresee $2 a litre within a few years Surveys by Budget Direct suggest 30% of motorists in Australian cities will stop using their car to commute if petrol reaches $1.75 a litre Watch the arctic this September – the canary in the mine. We may only be three-four years from an ice free arctic in summer
  9. 9. Courtesy of Professor Peter Newman
  10. 11. Climate Code Red
  11. 12. The Elephant in the Room Climate Change Adaptation The Biggest Problem?
  12. 13. <ul><li>Adaptation Strategies in response to Changing Climatic and Environmental Conditions </li></ul><ul><li>a) Risk minimisation which takes into account impacts associated with rising temperatures, changing rainfall patterns, rising sea levels and changing storm frequency, type and intensity. </li></ul><ul><li>b) Response to changes in land use/value and planning. </li></ul><ul><li>c) Prepare communities to adapt to climate change including: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>impacts of population increases (or changes) on infrastructure needs such as transportation, energy and water </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>bushfire intensity and frequency </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>Climate Change Adaptation
  13. 15. <ul><li>1. Economic development and diversity: employment, Indigenous engagement, entrepreneurship, trade and economic supply chains. 2. Infrastructure (social and physical): health, education, justice, transport, waste, power and water 3. Planning and PlaceMaking: the creation of place — affordable, liveable, amenable, home. 4. Governance: regional, state and federal. </li></ul>“ 4 themes to building good cities” or resilient towns and regions
  14. 16. <ul><li>1. Economic development and diversity: employment, Indigenous engagement, entrepreneurship, trade and economic supply chains. 2. Infrastructure (social and physical): health, education, justice, transport, waste, power and water 3. Planning and PlaceMaking: the creation of place — affordable, liveable, amenable, home. 4. Governance: regional, state and federal. </li></ul>“ 4 themes to building good cities” or resilient towns and regions
  15. 17. Infrastructure (social and physical): health, education, justice, transport, waste, power and water The ‘body’ and ‘organs’ of a city, town or region relies on its essential physical and social infrastructure services; its ongoing operations need ‘sustenance’ in the form of energy, good metabolism, and the social infrastructure that enables a healthy, innovative, fair and secure place to live. In support of Place
  16. 18. Planning and PlaceMaking: the creation of place — affordable, liveable, amenable, home. People live in cities, towns and regions for lots of reasons; these might be historical, for employment or to maintain or pursue their relationships. But people stay for their sense of place — that is, the way the area makes them feel and the ability it gives them to connect with their surroundings, whether physical or metaphysical. Planning systems are set up to enable this to happen beyond individual project plans. The key is good planning •
  17. 19. Settlements State Sustainability Strategy
  18. 20. New Ways Needed – A Change in Direction <ul><li>Sustainable Energy </li></ul><ul><li>Future Urban Form </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sustainable Land Use (how to grow?) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Green Buildings (next steps) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sustainable Transport </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Biophillic city concept </li></ul></ul>Planning Responses
  19. 21. What is Biophilia? Biophilia Edward O. Wilson, a Harvard University entomologist, coined the term &quot;biophilia&quot;, referring to humans' &quot;love of living things&quot; - our innate affinity with nature
  20. 22. <ul><li>Increase Biodiversity and Stabilise Ecological Systems </li></ul>The Biophilic City Concept
  21. 23. Biodiverse Cities
  22. 25. <ul><li>Increase Biodiversity and Stabilise Ecological Systems </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction of Urban Farming (including Vertical Farms) Catering for Local Food Requirements and Reduction in Food Miles </li></ul>The Biophilic City Concept
  23. 26. Mole Hill Vancouver Edible Cities Cuba
  24. 27. Vertical Farms
  25. 28. <ul><li>Increase Biodiversity and Stabilise Ecological Systems </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction of Urban Farming (including Vertical Farms) Catering for Local Food Requirements and Reduction in Food Miles </li></ul><ul><li>Improvement in Water Management, Efficiency and Recycling </li></ul><ul><li>Decreased Energy Intensity through Reduced Heat Island Effect – Consideration of Climate Change Adaptation due to ▲ ºC into the Future </li></ul><ul><li>Improved Health and Well Being (Biophilia and Reduced Pollution) and Associated Productivity Improvements </li></ul><ul><li>Bio-sequestration of Legacy CO² </li></ul>The Biophilic City Concept
  26. 29. Conclusions New Ways Needed – A Change in Direction <ul><ul><li>Sustainable Built Form and Land Use </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Fewer cars (less roads), more public transport…..pedestrian and cycling priorities </li></ul></ul></ul>
  27. 30. Destiny of all life lies within technology
  28. 32. Conclusions New Ways Needed – A Change in Direction <ul><ul><li>Sustainable Built Form and Land Use </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Fewer cars (less roads), more public transport…..pedestrian and cycling priorities </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Urban growth containment </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Transit Oriented Development (TODS, PODS, CODS and GODS) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Urban farming, local food supply </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Biophilic cities </li></ul></ul></ul>
  29. 33. The Biophilic City in the Pilbara?
  30. 34. The Biophilic City

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