Extra Time: Community Football and Older People
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A selection of slides from my presentation on the Extra Time project managed by the Football Foundation (the UKs largest sports charity). The presentations covers Social Return on Investment and the ...

A selection of slides from my presentation on the Extra Time project managed by the Football Foundation (the UKs largest sports charity). The presentations covers Social Return on Investment and the story behind the headline. This was presented at the World Congress on Active Ageing, as part of a symposium.

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  • - ET began in 2008
  • Explain each approach…
  • Explain each approach…
  • Explain each approach…why were such informal approaches needed?
  • 985 entry surveys 14/20 clubs returned matched surveys
  • Biggest age group is the over 80s…we have split this out in this year’s survey
  • Personal happiness was 79% before
  • Some less need for physio
  • ACCEPTING ENVIRONMENT Out of comfort zone

Extra Time: Community Football and Older People Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Football Foundation:Extra TimeEvaluation of Extra TimeFriday 17th August 2012Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 2. Purpose of today’s presentation. What am I going to cover? • Acknowledgements • Background to project • What is Extra Time • The methodology employed • Results • Discussion points • Key factors & challenges • RecommendationsEvaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 3. Acknowledgements. Who has helped make this happen? Project Team: • Femina Makkar – National Manager Extra Time (FF). • Clare Fitzboydon – Head of Communications and Corporate Relations (FF). • Nick Stone – Extra Time Coordinator (FF). • Steve Futter – Mayors Fund Programme Manager (FF). Research Team: • Lizzie Trotter – Evaluation Analyst (FF). • Dan Parnell – University of Derby. • Dave Richardson – Liverpool John Moores University. The Clubs: All 20 English Premier League and Football League Clubs. • Blackburn Rovers, Bristol Rovers, Liverpool, MK Dons, Morecambe, Portsmouth, QPR, Bradford City, Charlton Athletic, Colchester Utd, Everton, Norwich City, Nottingham Forest, Plymouth Argyle, Rochdale, Rotherahm Utd, Scunthorpe Utd, Swindon Town, Tottenham Hotspur & Watford. Funders & supporters. Football Foundation, Sport Relief (& supported by Age UK)Evaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 4. Background. Where did Extra Time start? •High levels of social exclusion in older people. (Social Exclusion Unit, 2006) •Ageing population. •Key findings from existing research around older people and: – Barriers to activity. – The effects of physical inactivity. – Levels of emotional wellbeing. – The consequences of social isolation. •National and local relevance of Extra Time: – The costs of the ageing population to the NHS. – Priorities in local areas.Evaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 5. Extra Time. What is the project? • Extra Time aimed: To promote positive physical and social opportunities in older people (over 55 years) • The research aimed to explore: To explore the social and economic impacts of Extra Time using a Social Return on Investment (SROI) analysisEvaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 6. Research methodology. How did we complete the research? • SROI is an adjusted cost-benefit analysis that quantifies the value of social, environmental and economic outcomes that result from a service/programme (NEF, 2004). • Stakeholder (i.e., participants and the state) engagement helped identify the outcomes (using entrance and exit surveys). • A focus on 5 FitC schemes undergoing in-depth study.Evaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 7. Research methodology. In depth case study in the 5 clubs • Five projects purposefully selected: mix of delivery methods, target groups, new and existing projects, and spread around the country. – Bristol Rovers. – Colchester United. – QPR. – Rotherham United. – Scunthorpe United. • Each club was visited by Lizzie, who employed informal and interactional research techniques (including observations, informal interviews and personal reflections) - over 70 people consulted. • Project partners also interviewed.Evaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 8. In-depth case studies. Why choose these clubs? Delivery Approach: • Varied. Different groups targeted within the older age group. Either: – General age-appropriate activities. – Tailored provision for niche group. • They benefited participants in different ways. Neither approach was more preferable – it was important that they meet a need in the area. Partnerships: • Varied. Some clubs had partnerships that effectively led the project, in others they had a lesser role. • Involvement was to offer knowledge or referrals, or to use the opportunity to access a hard-to-reach group.Evaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 9. Most value is created for the participant. Authors are keen to tell the story of the The results show £1 of complex measures investment into Extra Time and data involved results in £5.22 of social and not merely value. focus on the SROI headline.Evaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 10. Analysis of entry and exit surveys. •442 matched entry and exit surveys. •Individuals were allocated numbers •Measure the change occurring over •Measured breadth and magnitude ofEvaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 11. The surveys – demographics. An insight. Age of participants Gender split 6% 4% 23% 21% 41% 14% 59% 18% 14% 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 Female Male 70-74 75-79 80+ • 26% had long-term health problems. • 9% were registered disabled.Evaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 12. Results – survey highlights. Key findings. • 21% used health services less. • 50% said they felt healthier. • 75% made friends and had fun. • 70% said they found everyday tasks easier. • 92% said their personal happiness was at least satisfactory in the exit survey. • 89% felt they had more people looking out for them. • 81% stated the football connection made Extra Time more appealing.Evaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 13. Results – discussion. Social Isolation. Reduction in social isolation – more socialising. • Majority of participants did not consider themselves socially isolated before Extra Time. • The participants in sheltered housing were more isolated. • However, participants greatly valued the chance to make new friends and to regularly meet with them. 75% said they made friends and had fun. – Are the right people being engaged? – How can truly socially isolated older people be reached?Evaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 14. Results – discussion. Reduced social isolation. Feeling more supported. • This was a much more significant element of the social isolation outcome. • Although people were not socially isolated, many felt they lacked a support network. Many had lost existing social networks through retirement or felt a burden to their family. • 89% felt they had more people looking out for them, 84% felt they had more people they could call on. – The importance of support network element suggests a focus.Evaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 15. Results – discussion. Improved physical health. • 70% felt more able to perform daily tasks • 59% felt more flexible • 56% felt stronger • 45% felt stiffness had improved • Small improvement shifts in ease of physical tasks. • 11% achieved 3x30 minutes of exercise a week. – Higher intensity results in greater benefits. Need to achieve balance of challenging participants without intimidating them. – Participants currently unlikely to continue any exercise without the project. – Implications on continuing provision or increasing focus on sustainability.Evaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January on Active Ageing Fit Fans | Friday 17th August 2012, World Congress2011
  • 16. Results – discussion. Use of health service. Change in health service use. • 21% stated they used the health service less as a result of Extra Time. • Majority were fewer GP visits: e.g. fewer injuries or minor health problems. • 7% stated reduced medication; e.g. blood pressure tablets, painkillers for joint problems. • Small increase in use due to awareness but overall reduction. – Extra Time does have an effect on participants’ health service use. More research needed to fully understand this; GP records or incorporating health checks.Evaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 17. Results – discussion. Confidence changes. • Participants stating their confidence was at least satisfactory went from 69%-85%. • The project gave many a sense of achievement that they didn’t expect. • It reminded many that they were capable – some after a fall or an illness. • Playing with others of a similar age, instead of competing with younger players, restored confidence – Encouraging participants to push themselves can result in significant changes in this area.Evaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 18. Results – discussion. Emotional wellbeing. • At least satisfied with quality of life went from 74%-84% and personal happiness from 78%-92%. • The project helped some participants deal with stress, anxiety, depression as well as drinking problems. • Many examples of individuals stories e.g. at Bristol helping individuals come to terms with an Alzheimers diagnosis. – Extra Time made a significant difference to participants’ lives. It often gave a sense of purpose where it was lacking, something to look forward to, and for many, a new lease of life.Evaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 19. Results – discussion. The role of the Football Club? • 81% said the connection with the club made Extra Time more appealing. • The history of the club was important; revisit youth and access old memories. • Provided common ground around which to base relationships. • Contributed to sense of community between participants. • Well-trained, caring, enthusiastic staff. • Being provided for by high-profile, glamorous, organisation contributed to self-esteem. • The facilities – usually location, rather than quality, were vital.Evaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 20. Results – discussion. The role of the Football Club – The professional football club is in a unique position within local communities, regardless of whether individuals are fans. – History, sense of establishment, glamour and sense of belonging, all assist with engagement and benefits. – The association with the club should not be relied on to engage the target group.Evaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 21. Results – discussion. Engaging older men. • A third of male participants were fans of the football club. • Some had a link with the club from their younger days – revisiting an existing relationship • There was less stigma attached as an older person’s group • Engagement of men was a rare and valuable opportunity for project partners. – Extra Time succeeds where others struggle. – Good pull to establish partnerships.Evaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 22. Key points. Success factors. • Communicating with participants: – Offer the right activities and consider preferences. • Fun sessions and varied activities: – People enjoyed the sessions and having a laugh. • Encouraging the participants: – Benefits of leaving comfort zone. • Strong partnerships: – Guidance, support, experience, referrals. • Camaraderie: – Feeling of togetherness and support between participants was crucial to the benefits experienced.Evaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 23. Delivery considerations… Key points. • Consider whether another tactic should be used to access the truly socially isolated. • The project should be best fit locally. – Work closely with local partners to ensure relevance to LAA. – Specialist partners should continually feed into project. • Explore possibility of getting a GP on the steering group. – GPs will be managing local healthcare budgets. • Increase emphasis on activities being self-sustained by participants. • Explore the relevance of, and demand for, exit routes and work with partners to establish.Evaluation of Extra TimeAugust 2012, World Congress on Active Ageing Extra Time | Friday 17th | Wednesday 12 January 2011
  • 24. Thank you.