DANIEL LEARB o sto n Ar chitectural Co lleg e   B achelo rs o f Ar chitecture
DANIEL LEARB o sto n Ar chitectural Co lleg e B achelo rs o f Ar chitecture                 Segm ent II P o rtf o lio R ev...
STATEM ENT      Creative design thrives in a collaborative environment, where projects push the boundaries of social, econ...
41   A Hostel for Boston              Curriculum v itae                                                          37   Chin...
Grassi Design Group | Project Designer ......................................................................................
CONCEPT                                                                                                                   ...
CONNECTING THE CAMPUS                                                                                                     ...
CONCEPT                                                   CONSTRUCTIVIST JOINT                                            ...
INTEGRATION OF THE CONSTRUCTIVIST JOINTThe program for the pavilion is split into two parts, one for water collection and ...
Water is pumped through a                                          The rainwater is funneled through                     P...
ELEMENTS OF THE CONCEPT                       SITE ANALYSIS                                                               ...
CONCEPT The box-like shape of the exhibit space created a very boring and regular space for displaying work by architectur...
INTERIOR PERSPECTIVES                                                                                                     ...
PROJECT GOALS                                                6                      ORIGINAL FLOOR PLAN                   ...
CONCEPT     Shown at left are the before and after diagrams of the     circulation, program, and privacy. The top two diag...
FRAMING VIEWS                                                                                                             ...
STRUCTURE                                                                                            5                    ...
SECOND FLOOR PROGRAM                                                                           The second story is for lou...
PROJECT GOALS                                                    The apparatus project was an introductory project that as...
BUILDING DETAIL 1                                                                                                         ...
CONCEPT                                                                                                                   ...
Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013
Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013
Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013
Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013
Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013
Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013
Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013
Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013
Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013
Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013
Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013
Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013
Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013
Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013
Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013
Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013
Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013
Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013
Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013
Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013
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Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013

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A collection of work from Montana State University and Boston Architectural College.

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Daniel Lear | Portfolio January 2013

  1. 1. DANIEL LEARB o sto n Ar chitectural Co lleg e B achelo rs o f Ar chitecture
  2. 2. DANIEL LEARB o sto n Ar chitectural Co lleg e B achelo rs o f Ar chitecture Segm ent II P o rtf o lio R ev iew JANUARY 2 , 2 012
  3. 3. STATEM ENT Creative design thrives in a collaborative environment, where projects push the boundaries of social, economical, and environmental perceptions. Limitations and constraints can be seen as unique opportunities for innovation and development in design. By examining the needs of the site, as well as the environmental, physical, and social needs of the community, the structure can serve a function greater than it’s intended purpose. Emphasizing the concept of framing view points, architecture can be structured as a stage for the surrounding environment. Using shape and negative space to orchestrate the experience of the perceiver, a building is capable of merging the built and natural environments. By utilizing materials and construction methods that consider the human scale, as well as the proportions and geometry of nature, a sense of comfort and enjoyment can be conveyed to a building’s occupants. Architecture that interacts and is relevant to the environment of a site creates a greater sense of human relationship with the building.iii ii
  4. 4. 41 A Hostel for Boston Curriculum v itae 37 Chinatown Cultural Center STUDIO WO R K 33 Arnold Arboretum Pavilion P ERSO N AL 29 Apparatus P R OFESSIO N AL 23 Charles Rive Boathouse 19 Building Analysis 13 Cheever Hall 07 Montana State Pavilion 67 1.26 Tsunami 73 On Tiwanaku 05 Point, Line, Plane 49 46 Wood Duck 59 Every Beating Second 01 Curriculum Vitae 03 Cube Metamorphosis 43 41 West River Road 1 55 Dilworth Plazai CO NTENTS 00
  5. 5. Grassi Design Group | Project Designer ......................................................................................................... June 2012 - Current + Guide luxury residential construction projects through the design development, & schematic design & construction phases. + Create construction documents for luxury residential projects across the country. + Projects involve extensive use of design software to create photo-quality renderings & presentations. + Organizing and scheduling daily meetings/conferences to meet project deadlines. + Work in a collaborative environment to develop projects at the conceptual level. P R OFESSIO N AL E X P ER IEN CE Studio Echelman | Project Manager ......................................................................................................... June 2010 - March 2012 + Guide large-scale public art installations through conceptual design, design development, & construction phases. + Projects involve extensive use of design software to create photo-quality renderings & presentations. EDUCATIO N + Scheduling and budgeting to meet project goals. + Organizing and scheduling daily meetings/conferences to meet project deadlines. + Work in a collaborative environment to develop projects at the conceptual level. Word of Mouth Media | Founder & CEO ........................................................................................................... July 201 - Current 1 + Create graphics for web and print media + Design branding and advertising material for small and large businesses + Web design, coding, and maintenance + Organizing and scheduling daily meetings/conferences to meet project deadlines. + Work in a collaborative environment to develop projects at the conceptual level. Boston Architectural College .......................................................................................................................................... 2010- Present + Candidate for Bachelors of Architecture Environmental Design. + Focus on sustainable design in Architecture Montana State University ................................................................................................................................................... 2006-2009 + Candidate for Bachelors of Architecture Environmental Design.01 CUR R ICULUM V ITA E 0 2
  6. 6. CONCEPT I began my study by sketching various ways of dividing a square into sections using the methods of: 1. Addition 2. Subtraction 3. Sculpting From these sketches, I chose the three that I found to be most aesthetically pleasing to develope further into three dimensional models out of museum board (shown at the top of page 03). The first starts with a much   1 2 3 smaller cube and uses the method of addition to imply the form of a much larger cube. The PROJECT GOALS second cube starts with a large cube and uses the method of subtraction to deconstruct the form and generate interest. The third model The cube metamorphosis project was a semester long uses the method of sculpting to create the form project focused around deconstructing the cube. Our of a cube by “bending” a tube-like shape into goal was to discover ways of taking the form of a cube a cube form. and creating using it to create space that generates visual and aesthetic interest. We started by creating The next task for this project was to integrate three dimensional models of cubes out of museum these cubes into a landscape model (shown board. We were then asked to integrate these cubes   in image in center of page 03). My goal here into a landscape model. The last task was to translate was to continue the addition, subtraction, or these ideas into an occupiable space. sculptural element from each side of each cube onto the surface of the landscape. This would seamlessly integrate the cubes into the model. After integrating the cubes, it was time to take what I had learned and use it to translate my idea into an occupiable space. I began by painting a parti (shown at left). This parti evokes the geometric forms that I wanted   to achieve in the creation of my final model. Using the methods of addition, subtraction, and sculpting, in combination with the parti, I was able to create my final model (shown in the three images at left). Here I used the idea of projecting the surface features of the cubes onto the landscape to integrate the cubes. I wanted the cubes to become part of the landscape and for both the cubes and the landscape to reflect the aesthetic qualities of my parti.03 CUB E STATE UNIV ERSIT Y | FIRSTRYP HOSIS L 2 0 0 6 | JACK SM ITH MO NTAN A M ETA MO EAR STUDIO | FAL 04
  7. 7. CONNECTING THE CAMPUS I began my study with simple black and white sketches that created compositions using only the area of the planes given to us, and the shape of the three sticks provided (shown at the top of page 05). The next step was to experiment with various ways of creating space between planes. The diagrams at the left show three of explorations PROJECT GOALS that I chose to employ in my design. I wanted to create two spaces, one that was intimate and enclosing, and one This project was a four week first year studio project aimed at that was public and exposed. I also wanted to draw interest to the structure by utilizing height as a beacon. By learning how to utilize three important design tools To create creating a wall containing apertures, I was able to create an intimate space that still allowed the occupant to see occupiable space. These three tools are the point, the line, and out. The placement of the sculpture is at the intersection of two “worn paths”. These paths reveal unintended routes the plane. The assignment called for use to create a structure that pedestrians utilize. My sculpture attempts to connect the surrounding locations by providing both a path where for a site just outside our classroom that students could sit and there is desire for one, as well as a place of interest along that path. The diagram below shows the intersection of relax on their way to or from class. To create this structure we these paths and the locations they connect to. were to use only two 6”X2” planes of paper and three 6” sticks. The goals of this project were to: 1. Discover how to create various forms of occupiable space. ie: private, public, intimate, awe inspiring, relaxing, etc. 2. Integrate the design ideas to the site. 3. Keep the focus on what we create from the limited materials we were given.0 5 MO NTAN A STATE LUNIV ERSIT, Y |P LANESTUDIO | FAL L 2 0 0 6 | JACK SM ITH P O INT , INE FIRST Y EAR 06
  8. 8. CONCEPT CONSTRUCTIVIST JOINT While this project had few constraints, the site provided a unique opportunity At left are the three models I created for the building to utilize the roof as a rainwater collection system. The structure using constructivist joint techniques. The could not block the sidewalk, and it had to be located on the MSU Campus at models are constructed of plexiglass, the convergence of three main sidewalks. This called for a very light and open cork and stainless steel. The first model structure that was created by utilizing a skeletal system constructed of finished demonstrates the constructivist joint wood. method of clamping. The plexiglass is clamped between layers of cork. The The roof was designed with glass panels allowing visitors to see the sky above second model demonstrates embracing. and watch rainwater collection during a storm. The taller section of the pavilion The plexiglass is held up because it employs a photocatalysis system for filtering rainwater. This system is meant to be is embraced on both sides by the a model for similar systems that could potentially provide potable drinking water cork. The last model demonstrates for communities in Africa and South America where people have to travel over the constructivist joint technique of a mile each way to have access to potable water. The system uses a titanium- penetration. The cork planes penetrate dioxide slurry, a translucent plastic container, and the ultraviolet radiation from each other to create a structure. 2 the sun to sanitize the water. 1 Shown at left is the structure of the building and the translucent rainwater collection rooftop. Water is filtered through each of nine bays and poured down into a water storage tank below. My final model is shown in the image below. PROJECT GOALS The Montana State Pavilion design was 3 a six week design challenge to create a contemplative space for students and faculty of Montana State University. The structure had to be an inviting place for students to relax and enjoy their surroundings and was to be sited at the entrance to Cheever Hall on the Montana State University campus. The main goals for this project were: 4 1. Study the various forms of constructivist joints. 1 Entry 2 Rainwater Collection 2. Build three models that represent 3 Water Storage / Distribution different constructivist joints. 4 Water Sanitizing System 3. Translate these models into a design for pavilion.07 MO NTAN A STATEEAR STUDIO | IO 2 0 0 6 | JACK SM ITH MO NTAN A STATE UNIV ERSIT Y | FIRST Y PAV IL N FAL L 08
  9. 9. INTEGRATION OF THE CONSTRUCTIVIST JOINTThe program for the pavilion is split into two parts, one for water collection and one for water storage (seen in the diagram above). The two compentents are designed tobe embracing each other. The columns use a clamping technique to join with the beams supporting the glass roof panels. The water storage and filtration tower also employsembracing techniques. The most obvious example is the translucent solar filtration channel that weaves between penetrating stainless steel elements.09 10
  10. 10. Water is pumped through a The rainwater is funneled through PROGRAM & DESIGNphotocatalysis water purification the collection bays and into storagesystem, which uses a translucent wall containers located below the ground The diagram at the left shows the process of photocatalysis water purification. Water enters the system and large particulate is filtered out by the bag filter. Then the water passesof titanium-dioxide coated plastic level. During rain collection the system through a cartridge filter that takes out the small particulate. The water is then added to a titanium-dioxide slurry that is the catalyst for the chemistry that filters the water. The waterto purify the water using ultraviolet creates nine columns of water. is then transported through a large transparent plastic container that exposes it to ultraviolet radiation from the sun. This causes a reaction that degrades volatile organic compoundsradiation from the sun. and endocrine disrupters such as bisphenol. The program of the pavilion is shown at left. At the entrance, large glass panels redirect rainwater over the sidewalk creating a waterfall. Under the roof is a seating area where you can watch rainwater being collected, or relax and enjoy the sky on a clear day. The taller portion of the building is the rainwater filtration and distribution section. Water is filtered via the system described above and there is an access point that allows anyone to collect free potable water. 1 2 3Rainwater is collected via a system 4of nine translucent collection baysbuilt into the roof of the structure. The Two collection bays funnel An access point is located here totranslucency of the roof allows you to 6 water onto glass panes that provide fresh naturally purified watersee the rainwater being collected and extend over the sidewalk to students and faculty passing by.provides a meditative escape from creating a waterfall effect thatthe elements. pedestrians can walk under. 5 P HOTOCATALYSIS WATER P UR IFICATIO N SYSTEM 1 Raw water feed - rainwater is moved from the below-grade collection system towards the bag filter. 2 Bag Filter - provides large particle filtration before being transferred to the cartridge filter. 3 Cartridge Filter - provides small particle filtration before being transferred to the TiO2 filter. 4 TiO2 slurry addition - addition of TiO2 slurry. 5 UV reactor - exposes water to Ultraviolet radiation from the sun to break down volatile organic compounds, toxins, & bacteria. 6 Clean water exit - filtered and sanitized water exits the system to a storage container made of antimicrobial plastic.11 12
  11. 11. ELEMENTS OF THE CONCEPT SITE ANALYSIS Shown at left are the key elements The site for this project was the display of my design for the exhibit space in gallery in the second floor of Cheever Cheever Hall. The first image (far left) is Hall, a building dedicated to architectural the proposed bench system. The second studies on the Montana State University image is the proposed wall construction Campus. Cheever Hall is located between for the space. The third image is the the dorms and College street, the main proposed louvre/passive light control throughway from one side of campus to system. The last image is the LED lighting the other. The building is also located at fixtures that would be used to illuminate the head of the “mall” sidewalk, the major the space during evening hours and form of pedestrian traffic through campus times of low natural light. leading to the Student Union Building. Across College street is the Montana State duck pond. The Front of Cheever Hall faces south towards College Street allowing the facade to be exposed to natural daylight throughout the day. Large windows allow this light to penetrate into PROJECT GOALS the hall, however it is then confronted by a cinder block wall that defines the exhibit The Cheever Hall remodel was a six space. To the west side of the exhibit space week studio project that asked to is the first and second year studio spaces. recreate the critique & exhibit space in The students that occupy these spaces are Montana State University’s Cheever the primary users of the exhibit space that Hall. Cheever Hall is the main building for is to be remodeled. On the east side of Montana State’s architecture program the exhibit space is a long hall that adjoins and is used by hundreds of students the north and south sides of the building. each year. The current space is a simple At the north side there are faculty offices. cinder block box with a drop ceiling, vinyl The exhibit space is a cube shaped room flooring, and doors at either end that that is in the center of a much larger space open up to the hallway. The four walls of as seen in the diagram at left (top). the space abut the first and second year studio spaces, as well as a highly used The goal that I set as my primary objective hallway. Established goals where: when redesigning this space was to connect the space to the studios and 1. Bring natural daylight into space hallway allowing passing pedestrians to see what is inside the gallery and decide 2. Connect the space to the studio and to stop and explore what is on display. hallway Shown in the diagram at left (bottom) I proposed to create three glass openings 3. Create display space for architecture in the cinder block walls to open the space students up to the adjoining areas and provide a “teaser” as to what is inside. This was aimed 4. Allow the space to adapt to multiple at generating interest and attracting uses as needed. students and faculty to the space.13 CHEEV ER H AL|LS ECO ND Y EAR STUDIO | FAL L 2 0 07 | B IL L R A E MO NTAN A STATE UNIV ERSIT Y 14
  12. 12. CONCEPT The box-like shape of the exhibit space created a very boring and regular space for displaying work by architecture students. I wanted to achieve some amount of interest in the space without drawing attention from the work that would be displayed in the space. My concept for achieving this was to create hanging benches that are curved at the top. These are meant to sculpt the space and break away from the traditional cube shape. The LED light fixtures are suspended through the ceiling and pass through large cut-outs in the wooden benches. This prevents the seating from blocking artificial light from reaching the display areas. The benches are also designed to have stainless steel channels for hanging student work. The bench can serve as seating when needed, or as a display space for student models. ELECTROCHROMATIC GLASS Because there are no windows in the space, a major part of my concept was to bring natural day lighting in. This was achieved by removing the drop ceiling and replacing the roof with exterior glazing. An added benefit of doing this was that the ceiling height was raised by four feet. To diffuse the light coming in from the ceiling, large wood panels are hung. These also function as a way of hiding any mechanical & electrical equipment that is necessary above. None of the walls were structural15 walls so I chose to recreate the walls with a system of alternating concrete and electrochromatic glass stripes. This glass could be darkened to provide privacy, or lightened to allow passing students to see into the space. The translucent wall would allow natural light from the southern windows to penetrate the space. 16
  13. 13. INTERIOR PERSPECTIVES At left are interior perspectives showing the finishes and design for each of the four walls of the space. Here you can see design influences from my previous studio projects. Particularly my study on the constructivist joints. The light fixtures penetrate the bench system creating a sense of unity. The benches on either side of the glass opening that faces the studio spaces are embracing and framing the view of the space beyond. INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE LOOKING EAST INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE LOOKING WEST INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE LOOKING SOUTH INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE LOOKING NORTH The benches are curved at the top to help control PRACTICAL COMPONENTSMATERIALS the acoustics of the room and to deviate from the square shape of the space. An over arching theme for thisMagnetic Glass - 1/4” thick magnetic tempered glass with matte cut edges is suspended project was functionality, because1/4” from the wall by hidden stainless steel mounting brackets. This glass accepts magnets the space of course had to also Lighting passes through the upper portion of thefor displaying student work, cleans with standard cleaning products and extremely scratch be used by the students and wooden benches and illuminates projects that areand mar resistent. faculty. Magnetic glass surfaces displayed on the wall. The shape of the bench create additional space for helps to reflect the light downward.Travertine Marble - white travertine marble creates a clean surface for the floor while hanging student work that is easilycreating minimal distraction from the student work on display. The marble cleans with cleanable. Designing the benchesstandard cleaning products, is extremely scratch and mar resistent and does not change Metal hanging bars allow artwork and to be suspended allows the floorcolor over time like common laminates. presentation boards to be easily suspended. This to be cleaned an polished with means no Homasote walls with pinholes in them. ease. Stainless steel tracks forRecycled Hard Wood- recycled wood is used to construct the benches. Finished with a low hanging student work mean noVOC natural wood finish created from sustainable materials and highly scratch resistant. painted homesote panels with pinholes in them. The shape of theStainless Steel- recycled brushed stainless steel is used for the light fixtures. Stainless steel The benches can be used for seating or benches help control acoustics inis durable over time and easily cleanable. displaying models during architectural critiques the space and reflect lighting onto and exhibitions. They are connected to the wall the display areas. Wooden boxes and suspended sixteen inches above the floor to provide adaptable seating and allow easy cleaning of the floors. surfaces for displaying models.17 18
  14. 14. PROJECT GOALS 6 ORIGINAL FLOOR PLAN The building analysis project was a four week project focused The original floor plan is shown at left. The most noticeable around analyzing a particular building through diagraming and then aspects of Mies’ design are that he has created a translating the findings into a building remodel that would improve 7 7 5 central core that contains the only private spaces in the upon the design. The building I chose to study was the Farnsworth 2 3 home. These are the bathrooms. The rest of the plan House by Mies Van Der Rohe. I chose this building for my analysis is very open does not provide any privacy for any of because I knew that it would be a challenge for me. The purity and the occupants. All rooms except the bathrooms have simplicity of the design would be hard to improve upon, however 4 views out the windows. The flooring continues beyond I knew that I could adapt this 1947 vacation home to meet the the envelope of the house to create the covered porch needs of today’s families. The first step in this process was to create and is also used on the uncovered porch. This was meant a set of base drawings to gain a greater understanding of the to create a seamless connection between exterior and site and the structure itself. The goal of the first half of this project interior spaces. The house only contains one set of doors was to discover latent qualities of the selected building to better 1 Porch at the entrance, and only one set of operable windows in understand the conceptual, material, and structural elements of 2 Covered Porch the rear. This is not an ideal configuration for ventilation. the chosen building. Upon completion of these first drawings, quick 3 Entry / Guest Bedroom 1 The kitchen faces outward and is blocked from the living study-model diagrams were made to explore and refine abstract 4 Living Room room. This particular setup was more conducive of families ideas and concepts that were discovered during creation of the 5 Bedroom in the 1940’s that considered the kitchen a functional initial drawings. In producing these diagrams observations and 6 Kitchen space that was not meant to be public. questions arose that helped to generate a better understanding of 7 Bathroom the differenced between documentation and analysis. Once the concepts were exposed, a thesis was drawn about the existing structure. Through the development of this thesis a “transformation” of the existing structure was to allow the articulation of analysis as a CHANGED FLOOR PLAN tool for design. By making changes and alterations to the Farnsworth 6 While diagraming and analyzing the house, I chose to House the thesis could then be tested and expounded upon. The 7 5 focus on privacy, program, and circulation. I discovered result of these mutations were not meant to be an understanding of that if I rotated the core of the house I could open the the structure as it is, but instead a realization of what the structure 2 3 kitchen up to the living room to create a more social could be. The exercise produced an enhanced understanding of 7 analysis, exploration, and understanding, allowing for the information space. This would make the space more suited for a 4 family in the 21st century. At the front of the home the gathered about the Farnsworth House to aid and inspire new ideas windows are replaced with a Nana Wall door system. for the home that naturally evolved from the existing concepts in its This is to better connect the interior and exterior spaces original construction. by allowing you to open the entire wall and make the covered porch part of the living room. On the opposite side of the core from the kitchen is a two-sided fireplace 1 Porch the opens to the bedroom and living room. This setup 2 Covered Porch creates a sitting area in the bedroom that has access to 1 3 Entry / Guest Bedroom the fireplace. The bathrooms open to either side of the 4 Living Room core allowing the bedroom to have a private bath and 5 Bedroom the living room to have a public bathroom. The closet is 6 Kitchen rotated to screen the bedroom from the living room and 7 Bathroom to create a sense of privacy.19 B UIL DIN G AL CO L LEG E | B1 STUDIO |FARIN GSWO |RTHEDHOUS E L B OSTO N AR CHITECTUR AN ALYSIS | SP R N 2 010 JAR R A MSDEL 20
  15. 15. CONCEPT Shown at left are the before and after diagrams of the circulation, program, and privacy. The top two diagrams 6 4 show the circulation of the house before and after the 5 transformation. The changes to the building allow access to the kitchen from the living room. The middle set of 1 diagrams show the program of the house. Here again you can see how the living room and kitchen now have access to each other. The bottom three diagrams show which spaces in the home are public and which are private. The first of the three shows a three dimensional diagram of the space. Blue spaces are private or semi- private while yellow spaces are public. The original floor plan created an axis that separated public and private 1 Porch spaces that followed a diagonal across the house. The 2 Covered Porch new floor plan squeezes all of the private spaces to one 3 Entry / Guest Bedroom end of the building. The diagram on page 22 highlights 4 Living Room the changes made to the floor plan. 5 Bedroom 4 6 6 Kitchen 7 5 7 Bathroom 2 3 1 NEW SECTIONS During the transformation, I tried to focus on preserving the purity and simplicity of the design and its proportions. The sections above show how the spaces would appear after the transformation. As you can see the living room and kitchen become one large space that would be better suited for social interaction. The wood paneling on the walls would be preserved and the proportions of the panels would be translated to the addition of the new set of kitchen cabinets and altered fireplace.21 22
  16. 16. FRAMING VIEWS SITE ANALYSIS During my building analysis project The form of the building was dictated by the discoveries made during site study of the Farnsworth House, I analysis. My primary concern with my design was to engage the occupants discovered that an over arching with the water and the activities taking place offshore. This was achieved theme of the building’s design was its by mapping site lines from one end of the esplanade to the other. These connection to nature. This was greatly site lines represent a path of vision by pedestrians from various points along achieve by utilizing the building’s form the esplanade. These site paths revealed a potential building footprint that as a frame for the view of nature was then merged with the idea of creating a building that functions like a beyond. I wanted to emulate this same set of binoculars. This led to a series of paintings that I created to explore the characteristic in my design for the aesthetic qualities of the proposed form. These are shown below. boathouse. Shown at left are diagrams that display the process in which I used to create the form of my design. I LINE OF SITE DIAGRAM - The above diagram shows site paths across the esplanade. These each one represents a straight began by using my discoveries during line of site from one side of the esplanade to the river. site analysis (described on page 24) to dictate which parts of the building would need to be translucent and which parts could be opaque. I divided the program of the building into two sections, the boat storage and the public space. These two sections of the building became apertures to the river beyond. PROJECT GOALS PAINTING 1 - This painting explored the PAINTING 2 - This painting was a more idea of the aperture and the concept literal representation of the proposed The Boathouse project was meant to be of having infinite apertures within one form and was meant to evoke the another. feeling that something special is hidden a continuation of my building analysis just beyond the surface. project. The goal was to take what POSSIBLE BUILDING LOCATIONS - This diagram shades in green the possible locations were opaque building structure we learned about analysis through would not block one of the previously mapped site lines. diagraming to comprehensively analyze the Charles river esplanade and create a design for a boathouse. The main goals of the project were to: 1. Do a comprehensive site analysis. 2. Design a boathouse in response to the discoveries made during the site analysis. PAINTING 3 - The last painting was BUILDING FOOTPRINT - Here is created to further explore the idea of a diagram showing the proposed making something more special by only footprint of the building. The vertical revealing part of it. dashed lines represent the site lines that will be preserved.23 CH ARCHITECTUR ALIV ER E BB1 STUDIO | SP R IN G 2 010 | JAR ED R A MSDEL L LES R OATHOUS E 24 BUILDING SHAPE DIAGRAM - This diagram contains a sketch idea for the shape of the footprint of the building. The shape is inspired by a set of binoculars that, in theory, would be focused on the river beyond. B OSTO N AR CO L LEG |
  17. 17. STRUCTURE 5 1 Entry The structure of the building 2 Cafe / Exhibit Space emulates the materiality of the 3 Dock surrounding trees and reflects 4 Men’s Locker room 1 2 their vertical presence. Each 5 Women’s Locker room structural element is spaced 6 6 Boat Storage & Rigging according to the golden ratio, creating perfectly proportional openings that frame both inward and outward views. The 4 wood members are meant to harmonize the building with the surrounding trees. The concrete 3 shell would be whitewashed to 3 create a very distinct frame for the vibrant water view beyond. The structure is designed to have a sculptural presence that draws attention to the waterfront and FIRST FLOOR PLAN then transferring that attention to the activity on the Charles On the first level is a public space that contains a cafe and a large dining / lounging dock. The opposite section of the River. The angled roof directs building contains storage for boats that is created using a glass wall system. This allows pedestrians to see the boats from the occupant’s view outward the outside of the building. Handicap accessible locker rooms are located on the first floor as well as a reception area focusing their attention on the located near the entry. water and it’s activities. 7 Office 1 1 8 1 1 8 Lounge 9 9 Bridge 10 Observation Deck 1 Open to Below 1 10 1 1 7 1 1 SECOND FLOOR PLAN25 A second level terrace provides public viewing and lounging space. The higher location provides uninterrupted views of the water and it’s activities. The office is located upstairs along with a lounge area for athletes and faculty. 26
  18. 18. SECOND FLOOR PROGRAM The second story is for lounging and viewing the river’s activities from a higher advantage. The office is located upstairs to allow faculty to keep watch over the boat storage and rigging area. Adjoining the office is a lounge for athletes and faculty to relax after a strenuous day of water sports. Views on the second level are directed out towards the water and are concentrated in the opposite direction attempting to limit the views of the city skyline and maximize views of the surrounding nature. FIRST FLOOR PROGRAM The interior public space of the boathouse is versatile and, while serving on a daily basis as a cafe and lounge area, can also be used to host large events and parties. The dock extends outward into the river allowing visitors to relax along the waters edge, or take in the excitement of the races. A athletes are greeted at a reception desk before the enter the locker rooms and boat storage. OUTCOME The purpose of this project was to learn how to do a comprehensive site analysis and apply translate the discoveries to conceptual ideas for a building. ISPACE HIERARCHY learned that when doing a site analysis it is not always simply about finding the environmental factors. ThereEach of the two sections of the building are divided into three sectors. are many different ways of looking at a site that canThe primary space, secondary space, and tertiary space. The primary shape the design of a project. This include but are notspace is the boat storage and cafe, the secondary space is the office, limited to social aspects of the site, circulation of thelounge, and the observation deck. The tertiary spaces are the entry and site, uses of various locations on the site, etc. This was areception areas. valuable concept to learn because it provides me with multiple tools for generating design ideas that will lead to a more meaningful and integration of the27 building to its site. 28
  19. 19. PROJECT GOALS The apparatus project was an introductory project that asked us to analyze three building details and create study models that evoked the idea of these building details. We were then suppose to translate one of these ideas into an apparatus. This apparatus would then be examined at different scales in comparison to the human size. This project would lead into the Arnold Arboretum Pavilion project. CONCEPT The concept of my apparatus was derived from a building detail that depicted how shingles would be attached to a roof. The essence of this detail was that a penetrating element was used to pin together repetitions of a single form. With my apparatus, I chose to represent this concept by using a single bolt to pin together planes that are each cut at an increasing angle. This created a an undulating space that could be occupied.2 9 AP PAR ATUS CO L LEG E | B2 STUDIO | SP R IN G 2 010 | J O N ATH AN H AN AH AN B OSTO N AR CHITECTUR AL 30
  20. 20. BUILDING DETAIL 1 BUILDING DETAIL 2This building detail depicts shingles being fixed to a building. With my study model I explored how I could use penetrating elements The second building detail depicts how glass glazing elements would be attached to structural columns. Here I wanted to experiment with the idea of attaching planes to a surfaceto take multiple planes together. I began with the sketch below of which I scaled to various sizes to begin to think of how sketch while leaving space in between the elements. I came up with the sketch shown below which emphasized the idea of attaching elements. I explored this sketch at various scales in comparison to the human scale to see how it may become occupiable space. The sketch lead to a study model thatwould interact with a human in three dimensional space. Then I built the study model in the image on the right. This model uses bent explores this concept of attaching planes. Here the planes are attached to each other with spacing in between.planes of museum board that are tacked to a cardboard surface using bass wood sticks. Clamped between the layers of museumboard are curved elements created from corrugated cardboard. When creating this model I tried to take a very sculpturalapproach that utilized only the techniques depicted in the given building detail. I learned from this study model that I wanted myapparatus to have a sculptural feel. I wanted it to create a defined shape out of repetition of elements. 2 1 BUILDING DETAIL 3 3 The last building detail shows two L-shaped components being clamped together by a C-shaped component. With my sketch I wanted to explore this idea of one element embracing another. I then explored this concept in my model shown at right. This model uses the same strategy of utilizing embracing elements to31 create form. 32
  21. 21. CONCEPT DESIGN DEVELOPMENT My concept starts with dividing the The sketches to the left show how the wood panels would appear from the side space into two spaces. The exhibit of the building. In this image it is easy to see the two spaces that have been space, and the utility space. The exhibit created. Separate from the exhibit space is a utility building. The two buildings space is a large glass box that is filled are connected by a cascade of stairs that lead to the entry of the building. with repeating wood panels that These stairs can be used amphitheater seating for concerts and events. The define the shape of the interior. The wood panels imply a box-like shape for the structure. exhibit space was then divided into to uses the entry and the space for displaying work. This dictated how the wood panels would be cut. I wanted to REPETITION OF FORM - From the side you can see the repetition of panels that create the form of the structure. carve out space from the front for the entry and carve out a larger space in the back for exhibit. The panels come all the way down to the ground to divide the two spaces. There is a cutout in the panels that creates an opening that connects the two spaces. The idea was to immediately block the occupants view from the exhibit space offering only a teaser of what is beyond the wooden panels. PROJECT GOALS BUILDING PROPORTIONS - the initial building proportions had to be scaled up to create enough usable space. The Arnold Arboretum Pavilion was a continuation from the apparatus project. Here we were asked to translate the ideas that we had formulated during the apparatus project into an occupiable space that would function as an educational pavilion for the Arnold Arboretum Pavilion. The Pavilion needed to create a space for exhibits to be displayed in order to generate interest in horticultural education.33 AR N AR CHITECTUR AL CO L LEG ER| B2 STUDIO | SPPAV2IL IO N AN H AN AH AN B OSTO N O L D AR B O ETUM R IN G 010 | J O N ATH WOODEN PANEL AXON - Here is an axonometric sketch of the wooden panels and how they would be arranged inside the glass envelope. 34

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