Yoga Ayurveda Workshop for Yoga Studios
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Yoga Ayurveda Workshop for Yoga Studios

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Yoga and Ayurveda have long been linked together as two complimentary systems of human development. They grew up organically intertwined through their common ancient Vedic roots – the legacy of the ...

Yoga and Ayurveda have long been linked together as two complimentary systems of human development. They grew up organically intertwined through their common ancient Vedic roots – the legacy of the legendary Himalayan rishis who understood the laws of the universe and the inner process of cosmogenesis that holds the keys to all transformations. The two systems have maintained a long and intimate history, interacting upon and enhancing one another up to the present day. Ayurveda is the “second phase” of interest in Yoga, which builds upon the first phase of interest in Yoga as an exercise system.

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Yoga Ayurveda Workshop for Yoga Studios Yoga Ayurveda Workshop for Yoga Studios Document Transcript

  • www.sattvahealing.com Sattva Yoga & Healing Yoga & Ayurveda Presented by Beverley Segel Yoga & Ayurveda Health Educator Registered Yoga Teacher Licensed Massage Therapist Certified Colon Hydrotherapist United States Medical Massage Association
  • Yoga & Ayurveda Yoga and Ayurveda have long been linked together as two complimentary systems of human development. They grew up organically intertwined through their common ancient Vedic roots – the legacy of the legendary Himalayan rishis who understood the laws of the universe and the inner process of cosmogenesis that holds the keys to all transformations. The two systems have maintained a long and intimate history, interacting upon and enhancing one another up to the present day. Ayurveda is the “second phase” of interest in Yoga, which builds upon the first phase of interest in Yoga as an exercise system. Yoga is seen as a popular exercise trend, an alternative medical therapy, a profound spiritual path, but to put Yoga in the proper perspective we must look at it anew, particularly with regard to individual adaptation. Yoga in Sanskrit means “to unite, coordinate, or energize”. It refers to the proper integration of body, mind and spirit to unfold our higher potential in life. Classical Yoga takes our ordinary capacities and extends them exponentially to help us develop an awareness that goes beyond our ordinary personal and human limitations. Yoga uses the foundations of the body, its secret energies and natural intelligence to reach the summits of the spirit. Classical Yoga is much more than a great exercise system, it has extraordinary healing potential for both body and mind, it addresses the structural imbalances in the body, like bone and joint problems, as well as organic dysfunctions, including hormonal and immune system disorders, particularly through meditation methods, Yoga treats nervous system disorders, emotional tension and psychological difficulties from stress to psychosis. For its healing purpose, classical Yoga is closely aligned with traditional Ayurveda “the science of life”, which can also be called Yogic medicine. Ayurveda uses diet, herbs, bodywork, pranayama, mantra and meditation as part of a holistic system of healing that parallels the practices of Yoga relative to the body, mind and spirit. They both reflect a dharmic approach to life, a seeking to keep all beings in harmony with the benefic laws of the universe. As Yogic healing becomes emphasized we must naturally turn our attention to Ayurveda as well.
  • pitta kapha vata sattva tamas rajas agni vayu soma doshas gunas cosmic forces yoga ayurveda yamas niyamas asana pratyahara pranayama dharana dhyana samadhi diet herbs life-style yoga meditation prakriti bodywork cleansing practices prana tejas ojas subtle doshas Healing sphere of Ayurveda & Yoga
  • Eight limbs of classical Yoga 1. YAMA – social ethics Ahimsa – non-harming, non-violence, non-killing Satya – truthfulness Asteya – non-stealing, non-craving, non-possessiveness Bramacharya – moderation Aparigraha – non-attachment 2. NIYAMA – personal practices Saucha – cleanliness and purity Santosha – contentment Tapas – self-discipline Svadhyaya – self-study and study of scriptures Ishvara Pranidhana – surrender to the Divine Will 3. ASANA – physical postures Right posture in harmony with our inner consciousness. A balance between tension and relaxation. Ayurveda prescribes Asanas together with proper life-style practices to reduce/balance the Doshas and Gunas. The healing power of Asana best comes out if we perform them in such a way that our mind comes to rest and our Prana is released of physical stress. Very useful for promoting health and vitality and treating many diseases.
  • 4. PRANAYAMA – breath & life force control Prana, life energy, is a natural healing force that carries all the life-giving involuntary functions of the body. Prana mimics the mind and emotions. 5. PRATYAHARA – internalizing sensory perception According to Ayurveda, physical disease arises from taking in unwholesome food, Pratyahara gives us control of the senses so that we do not crave wrong food. Impressions affect our emotions, Pratyahara moderates intake of sensory impressions. Mantra works with Pratyahara to still the mind. 6. DHARANA – concentration Control of the mind so that we give all our mental energy at will to whatever we need to examine. Dharana involves developing and extending our power of attention through concentration on certain objects or ideas. Increasing powers of attention is important to all healing. ADD and depression are usually a form of diminished power of attention. The power of attention is the main energy gateway to improving the quality of life. 7. DHYANA – meditation or absorption It is our capacity to sustain our attention without distraction. Meditation enables us to mirror reality and objectively perceive the truth of things. During Asana practice the inner stillness grows until you become absorbed in the harmony of the body, mind and prana. Meditation is a high state of awareness. 8. SAMADHI – union Samadhi is the state of unity, it is the capacity to merge with things in consciousness that show our joy and fulfillment in life. It is the natural outcome of true meditation and the goal of all that we seek.
  • Ayurvedic healing practices for body & mind The Ayurvedic approach is an effective life-management program with thoughtful attention given to spiritual, psychological, and physical wellness resulting in total wellness. FOOD CHOICES – conscious selection of foods demonstrate our willingness to be self-responsible for our well-being. SLEEP – regular sound sleep allows our mind to rest and renews the body. CONSERVATION and PURPOSEFUL USE OF AVAILABLE ENERGY – excesses of any kind: worry, anxiety, extreme effort to concentrate, restlessness, too much talking and laughing, overuse of any of the senses, ingestion of toxic substances, insufficient rest or sleep, too much socializing, and overwork, dissipate vital energy. Vital forces are conserved by mental peace, emotional calmness, rational thinking, faith, moderate talking, prudent use of the senses, nourishing foods, sufficient sleep and rest, dispassion when interacting with others and the environment, relaxed accomplishment of purpose, meditation and divine remembrance. Conserved vital forces are transmuted into subtle and fine essences to nourish the body and refine the brain and nervous system. Herbal therapy Mantra (psychological healing) Diet & exercise Neti pot Medicated oils – Oleation Therapy (Snehana) Swedana (sweating therapy) Pancha Karma – radical cleansing therapies Marma therapy & Massage Dinacharya – balanced daily regimen
  • The three Doshas Kapha is the sustaining or conserving force responsible for tissue formation, substance, cohesiveness and support. Kapha acts primarily through the plasma or lymphatic system as the underlying nutrient solution making up the bulk of the body and providing nourishment to all the tissues. The stomach is its main site in the disease process, in which excess mucus spreads through the blood and lymph to different parts of the body. Pitta is the fiery or transformative force responsible for digestion, warmth and perception of all types. Pitta acts primarily through the digestive system and the blood as the body’s basic thermogenic power. The small intestine is its main site in the disease process, in which excess acids or toxic Pitta accumulates and spreads through the blood to different parts of the body. Vata is the propulsive or energetic force responsible for movement, expression and the discharge of all impulses. Vata acts primarily through the nervous system through which it flows like and electric current. The colon is its main site in the disease process, in which waste gases or toxic Vata accumulates and spreads to the blood, bones and other parts of the body. Kapha – water, mucus or phlegm Heavy / Cold / Moist Pitta – fire, bile Hot / Light / Moist Vata – air, wind Dry / Cold / Light
  • The three Gunas Tamasic individuals suffer from mental dullness, inertia and lethargy. They have little motivation to achieve either spiritual or material goals. Emotionally they have severe blockages and are unable to express themselves harmoniously, easily falling into violence and delusion. Their lives generally remain in a stagnant state, with little ability to change or improve themselves. Rajasic individuals are over active and agitated in mind, running from one thing to another in the pursuit of their desires. They have much drive, ambition and assertion but little peace or calm. They promote their own interest, protect those who serve them and are hostile to those who oppose them. Emotionally they have a fair amount of anger and don’t like to be obstructed in what they do. Sattvic individuals are peaceful, calm and concentrated in mind. They have good thoughts and intentions and spontaneously do good actions. They are considerate, compassionate and selfless, placing the needs of others above their own. Emotionally they have much love, faith, devotion and contentment. Tamasic Types Rajasic Types Sattvic Types
  • Vata – thin long bones, may have elongated necks or long backs which makes them prone to skeletal problems. Quick, abrupt, irregular, fast and unpredictable, often followed by long periods of stasis. Vata body is serpent like, thin, energetic, but erratic – easily causes structural problems and injuries. Pitta – moderate builds, with average length bones.Moves like a frog; steady, bounding, determined and aggressive, can be one sided or one-directional – leads to excess or imbalance in one area or another. Kapha – often stocky with short joints and necks, may have difficulty with certain Asanas like Lotus Pose. Kapha types move like a swan, they are slow, steady, wavy and meandering, often ceasing altogether, which leads to blockage of energy and difficulty in movement. doshic movement
  • Mantra Asanas for the mind.
    • Asana controls the body
    • Pranayama controls the breath
    • Mantra controls the mind
    • There is no release of the gunas from (Chitta) consciousness, but they can be transformed. Excess Rajas and Tamas can be changed into Sattva. This occurs through mantra or sound therapy. Sattvic mantras like OM help to change the Rajasic and Tamasic patterns of our deeper consciousness and make it Sattvic.
    • Mantra is the deepest energization of speech. Our mind is composed of our thoughts, which is a subtle from of speech, our internal conversation. As mental speech, our internal dialogue, is the root of thought, controlling it enables us to control the mind itself.
    • Mantras like OM have the same calming and uplifting affect on the mind and heart that the lotus pose does for the body and breath.
    • Mantra is the foundation for the practice of meditation, which consists of the higher stages of mantra in which the mind is in a silent,
    • concentrated and reflective state.
    • Mantra provides the sound vibrations for balancing the doshas, gunas, Agni and other factors. The repetition of mantras develop a subtle vibration that can come to serve as the background pattern of our minds, and if we continually go back to a mantra each time our mind’s static emerges, this will bring a vibration of harmony into the mind.
    • OM
    • OM Namah Shivayai!
  • Meditation Practice   Gaze on a candle flame or the fire of your fireplace for fifteen minutes in the evening (the flame will make it easy for you to concentrate and bring your mind to a state of meditation, it will help you rediscover the flame within you). Or Visualize a golden flame of truth within your heart and concentrate on it as the source of all your being. Or Concentrate on a particular mantra like OM or HREEM, repeating it on a regular basis until it becomes the dominant background thought or sound in the mind. Or Look up into the day sky and contemplate the shifting clouds – all things in existence are like passing clouds in the infinite space of consciousness. Or Contemplate the night sky and its endless stars – we are all but points of light in the unlimited glittering canopy of existence. Or Contemplate the endless expansion of the ocean and its innumerable waves – we are but waves of bliss on the cosmic sea.   See nature as the very field or garden of your soul – develop a mind that is vast enough to encompass the entire world without losing its own peace or equipoise.
  • mantras to be repeated daily for a period of time to quiet the mind and still the body   OM SRI KALYAI NAMAHA (ohm shree kahl-yi nah-mah-ha)   OM is the cosmic sound, the mystic name of God. SRI invokes the Divine Mother, in all of her aspects. KALYAI invokes the Divine Mother in her aspect as destroyer of negative forces and remover of obstacles. NAMAHA means “to that Divine Name” and is a form of closure to Vedic mantras.     OM SRI DURGAYAI NAMAHA   (ohm shree dur-gah-yi nah-mah-ha)   DURGAYAI invokes the Divine Mother in her aspect as destroyer of negative forces and remover of obstacles in the maternal, material and spiritual fields.
  • Dinacharya individual daily balance regimen (sample) Ayurveda provides a foundation for healthy living by outlining the main practices that one should undertake on a daily basis to promote optimal health and optimal usage of our faculties. Consult with an Ayurvedic Health Educator or Practitioner to set up an appropriate Dinacharya for you.
    • Wake up before sunrise
    • Use the bathroom
    • Brush teeth / scrape tongue
    • Neti pot
    • Drink a glass of warm water
    • Take herbs
    • Mantra or Dharana (concentrate)
    • Yoga exercises for your type –
    • Pranayama –
    • Aerobic exercise
    • Abhyanga (self oil massage)
    • Bathe
    • Liver flush
    • Hot herbal tea
    • Daily activities
    • Eat main meal midday
    • Light dinner
    • Meditate/Mantra if you want to.